Definition of manhandle in US English:

manhandle

verb

[with object]
  • 1Move (a heavy object) by hand with great effort.

    ‘seven guys had to manhandle the piano down the stairs’
    • ‘The coffin is manhandled back on the truck and heads off through the streets towards the cathedral graveyard, where, three hours later, the crowd has grown dense and patient.’
    • ‘I recall having to manhandle a heavy garden statue of Hermes, cast in lead, which we had been asked to look after while the owners moved house.’
    • ‘He and I manhandle his life-size plastic punching doll into the elevator.’
    • ‘With form filled in, you then have to manhandle your purchases onto a huge trolley, queue, pay for them, put them in your car, drive them home and assemble them yourself.’
    • ‘Its ammunition is heavy and difficult to manhandle.’
    • ‘This was no easy task since the heavy howitzers were not ‘fast movers,’ having to be manhandled with great effort every time a displacement was ordered.’
    • ‘This year I had no bag, so I just manhandled the thing out the door.’
    • ‘Signalmen, more used to manhandling the heavy levers of Victorian signal boxes, have begun controlling one of the area's busiest junctions with the click of a mouse.’
    • ‘They insisted the wooden piece was a work of art and should not have been manhandled by the long arm of the law.’
    • ‘A couple of months ago, the art was manhandled and censored when it appeared on the streets as part of the Liverpool Biennale.’
    • ‘He rambles and manhandles the equipment, testily blaming newfangled technology when he has difficulty with basic tasks such as placing a compact disc in a player.’
    • ‘Anyway, a rendezvous at Paddington has been arranged for tomorrow morning when the present, having been manhandled on the train, will be exchanged.’
    • ‘On such occasions his friends and colleagues would come to his rescue, up to six of them manhandling his heavy wheelchair.’
    • ‘Collected from buckets at street corners, transferred to barrels, then shipped north, often to landing places where there was no harbour or beach, it was manhandled ashore from pitching boats.’
    • ‘A bulky roll of red carpet is being manhandled through the narrow kitchen.’
    • ‘Mr Coverdale said his accident happened as he was seen manhandling a metal sheet across the roof.’
    heave, haul, push, shove
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Handle (someone) roughly by dragging or pushing.
      ‘a drunk had manhandled one of the deputies’
      • ‘She said: ‘I saw some officers come out of the station manhandling Gavin and my husband.’’
      • ‘He was manhandling a lady in her early twenties.’
      • ‘He also denied charges of manhandling the accused and not informing the British High Commission at New Delhi regarding their arrest.’
      • ‘She was just going to say she was manhandled by a porter with a penchant for egg sandwiches and, if that didn't work, threaten to have their royal appointment removed.’
      • ‘A burglar who manhandled a terrified 91-year-old woman when she caught him in her neighbour's flat has had his jail term cut by appeal court judges.’
      • ‘He walked out and claims he then saw his 26-year-old girlfriend being manhandled.’
      • ‘The sight of my mother fighting as she was manhandled into a police car outside our flat is truly something that will never leave me.’
      • ‘He regarded me with infuriating calm, grabbed my wrists, and manhandled me into the car.’
      • ‘They manhandled him into the house and forced him to unlock the safe and give them money.’
      • ‘For days she did not venture out for fear that she would be manhandled again.’
      • ‘The rapper then manhandles the fan before throwing him into the audience.’
      • ‘She had hardly had a chance to finish her drink when she was manhandled by burly bouncers and unceremoniously dumped outside the door.’
      • ‘The family, nonetheless, laid a charge of assault against the security officer, alleging that he grabbed Williamson and manhandled him.’
      • ‘She refused and was manhandled as a consequence.’
      • ‘We were roughly manhandled and told to stand facing the wall with our hands behind our heads.’
      • ‘Medics manhandled him back to the beach, to await rescue by sea.’
      • ‘The customers suspected of shoplifting were sometimes manhandled in a most indecent way.’
      • ‘The defendant started to protest and had been violently manhandled out of the premises.’
      • ‘These days, she's too big to be manhandled and too canny to be tricked.’
      • ‘And I haven't heard any apology to the younger man who was also manhandled out of the hall simply for defending Mr Wolfgang.’
      jostle, shove, hustle, handle roughly, push, pull
      View synonyms

Pronunciation

manhandle

/ˈmænˌhændl//ˈmanˌhandl/