Definition of mango in English:

mango

noun

  • 1A fleshy yellowish-red tropical fruit that is eaten ripe or used green for pickles or chutneys.

    • ‘In many parts of the world mangoes aren't exported much, because the locals eat them all.’
    • ‘I chop up whatever fruits and vegetables I have available and make a delicious salad including my favourite garbanzo beans and mangoes.’
    • ‘I picked up some fruits on my way home, so I now have at my disposal apricots, peaches, nectarines, lychee fruit, a mango, and assorted berries.’
    • ‘Ripe mangoes are eaten for dessert while pickles and chutney are prepared from unripe fruit.’
    • ‘Among the island's abundant fruits are bananas, mangos, breadfruit, guavas, plumrose, coconuts, passion fruits, and pineapples.’
    • ‘Coffee, cotton, peanuts, mangoes, citrus fruits, and sugarcane are other important crops.’
    • ‘For instance, large number of watermelons, mangoes and other summer fruits began appearing on handcarts in residential colonies and markets.’
    • ‘On the other hand, green mangos are popular in many dishes from India, Thailand, and Malaysia.’
    • ‘The ripe mango is golden yellow in colour and it did look appealing on a silk sari.’
    • ‘To serve, arrange the red fingerling bananas, blackberries, raspberries, dehydrated mangoes, and Brazil nuts on a large plate.’
    • ‘You can use almost any fruit you like, but ripe mangoes, apricots and peaches all work particularly well.’
    • ‘Pickled vegetables and fruits like lemons or mangoes are popular accompaniments to meals.’
    • ‘A fresh mango will give slightly to the touch, but stay away from very soft or bruised fruit.’
    • ‘Export of mangoes had been restricted earlier by the United States because of pest-risk.’
    • ‘Known as the queen of tropical fruits, the mango is probably the best loved tropical fruit worldwide.’
    • ‘Now, those industries have gone and globalisation means that we can buy sun-drenched pineapples, mangoes and passion fruit in the middle of winter.’
    • ‘The most commonly eaten fruits are mangoes, bananas, grapefruit, papayas, and oranges.’
    • ‘Unlike mangoes and other tropical fruits, a diverse community of fig trees provides food year - round.’
    • ‘Fruits markets are depending on fruits like pineapple and mangoes supplied locally and there has been a complete shortage of grapes, oranges and apples.’
    • ‘When ripe mangoes are an excellent source of vitamin C, Beta-Carotene and other related Carotenoids.’
  • 2The evergreen Indian tree of the cashew family that bears this fruit, widely cultivated in the tropics.

    • ‘He rose, said farewell to the mango tree and the pleasure garden.’
    • ‘I grabbed a mango tree when the tidal wave tried to sweep me away.’
    • ‘She was kneeling under our mango tree drying out some wheat.’
    • ‘They feel it when they walk by her mango tree or when they admire the colorful Haitian art she loved and used to decorate all of the hospital's buildings.’
    • ‘Although the mango tree did not originate in this part of the world, St Lucia now boasts many varieties.’
    • ‘A few men were having their afternoon siesta under the mango tree.’
    • ‘They saw a cat asleep atop a branch of a mango tree.’
    • ‘If growing a mango tree from seed, it should be planted with the rounded end facing upwards and be placed just below the surface of the soil.’
    • ‘Do you know of any properties or smallholdings, anywhere, with groves of mango trees for sale?’
    • ‘On August 29 I trimmed the upper branches of a mango tree in my backyard.’
    • ‘A homeowner who plants a mango tree does so with the expectation that mangoes will be reaped.’
    • ‘The over-grown mango tree still looked good and strong.’
    • ‘There was also a new type of wasp building a nest in the mango tree.’
    • ‘I have a mango tree that's been in the ground two years.’
    • ‘One sunny afternoon, Agueda took a stroll down her backyard, and noticed a familiar young man sitting under a mango tree.’
    • ‘Last year we featured a gardener who was enjoying summer fruit from a mango tree in his garden.’
    • ‘Canice tugs at a rope tied to the root of a riverside mango tree and pulls in a cylindric handmade bamboo trap.’
    • ‘While some mango trees take up to five years to fruit, others start fruiting very young.’
    • ‘A squirrel scrambles up the thick, twisted trunk of a mango tree.’
    • ‘Ada and another old lady are sitting on the ground under the mango tree.’
  • 3A tropical American hummingbird that typically has green plumage with purple feathers on the wings, tail, or head.

    • ‘Among these are the dark green Jamaican mango and the red- and black-billed streamertail hummingbirds.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from Portuguese manga, from a Dravidian language.

Pronunciation:

mango

/ˈmaNGɡō/