Definition of maneuver in English:

maneuver

(British manoeuvre)

noun

  • 1A movement or series of moves requiring skill and care.

    ‘spectacular jumps and other daring maneuvers’
    • ‘Shawn Michaels combined high-flying maneuvers with solid technical skills.’
    • ‘The student then completed a series of maneuvers, including stalls, spins, and lazy eights while gliding back to the practice field.’
    • ‘Six participants performed a series of maneuvers using each device.’
    • ‘Witnesses on the ground reported seeing the airplane conducting a series of acrobatic maneuvers when the right wing separated from the airplane.’
    • ‘The majority of these maneuvers require the use of centripetal force to hold both surfer and board in the correct place on the wave.’
    • ‘Despite this, Rosenthal completed the bomb run and instigated a series of violent maneuvers to throw the aim of the flak guns.’
    • ‘She put the ship through a series of difficult maneuvers at top speed.’
    • ‘Reverse parking into small spaces is also a must as it would not do to keep the purchasers waiting as simple manoeuvres turn into a protracted disaster.’
    • ‘The skill required in such a manoeuvre is not to be underestimated, especially in a tight skirt and four inch heels.’
    • ‘In short, they've reinvented their companies through a series of innovative maneuvers.’
    • ‘The best skaters are able to incorporate these maneuvers with extreme moves in a way that flows with intensity.’
    • ‘Snap competition was a contest between the twelve teams, each headed up by a senior, in which a series of marching maneuvers was carried out.’
    • ‘The spacecraft drifted about 200 meters away from the stage before starting a series of maneuvers.’
    • ‘He saw possible moves, manoeuvres, and attacks Alsonte could make, each motion replaying in his mind.’
    • ‘Disturbances can occur while a fish is at rest, when swimming forwards and backwards, and during maneuvers while moving in either direction.’
    • ‘Somehow, the complex high-speed manoeuvres and fluid movements seem to come naturally to a small child.’
    • ‘The probe's launch is the first in a series of critical navigational maneuvers on which the success of the mission depends.’
    • ‘Anyone who examines the route taken by Hanjour will see that it required a complex manoeuvre by an experienced pilot.’
    • ‘Attackers employed three maneuvers to generate movement and control.’
    • ‘Dara twisted her craft into a series of complex maneuvers.’
    operation, exercise, activity, move, movement, action
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    1. 1.1 A carefully planned scheme or action, especially one involving deception.
      ‘shady financial maneuvers’
      • ‘It would seem a shame to turn down such a cunning manoeuvre without a compelling need.’
      • ‘The key decision making and tactical maneuvers take place after the flop.’
      • ‘The move was obviously a manoeuvre intended to appease and, perhaps, deceive disaffected members who clamoured for fresh leadership of the party.’
      • ‘I may vote for him purely as a strategic maneuver.’
      • ‘Accordingly, it is planning its own free paper as a blocking manoeuvre.’
      • ‘Even if we do draw the line somewhere and ban certain eugenic manoeuvres, the financial incentive may play a prominent role.’
      • ‘A reasonable bridge building effort between activists and experts on both sides to try to address the issues through tactical maneuvers might be useful.’
      • ‘After a series of convoluted manoeuvres, Ryan was allowed to escape to France, and from there to Nazi Germany.’
      • ‘After roll call, she dives straight in with the day's tactical manoeuvres.’
      • ‘He has suggested that such tactical maneuvers could backfire.’
      • ‘The day of reckoning was postponed by a series of maneuvers, and the banknotes remained intact.’
      • ‘Most companies would try to change policies in backdoor maneuvers, often with relative success.’
      • ‘He wrote a book called The Prince in which he described the amoral maneuvers and machinations of men in power.’
      • ‘It continuously engaged in petty maneuvers.’
      • ‘Through a series of legal maneuvers Paul made his case before the Roman Governor and then to the Emperor himself.’
      • ‘I had situated myself in the far corner of the classroom, a tactical maneuver on my part.’
      • ‘Right now, the site's position as king of online toys owes as much to its unbeatable brand and the failures of its competitors as to its strategic maneuvers.’
      • ‘They should have performed a variety of dodge maneuvers.’
      • ‘Other financial maneuvers can be made that hurt small unsecured creditors by leaving less money on the table.’
      • ‘We talked of many things, fashion, religion, politics, all the while she tried to tempt me with new and suggestive maneuvers.’
      stratagem, tactic, gambit, ploy, trick, dodge, ruse, plan, scheme, operation, device, plot, machination, artifice, subterfuge, intrigue, manipulation
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    2. 1.2 The fact or process of taking carefully planned or deceptive action.
      ‘the economic policy provided no room for maneuver’
      • ‘English football has just about exhausted its room for manoeuvre in the domestic market.’
      • ‘There's little room for manoeuvre here, though.’
      • ‘The company would not allow room for manoeuvre on anything.’
      • ‘‘We seem to be seeing that in practice there is no room for manoeuvre, for negotiation or for real change,’ he said.’
      • ‘Burt and his colleagues might have room for manoeuvre.’
      • ‘Potentially, this imposes a degree of constraint on the party leadership's room for manoeuvre.’
      • ‘In such circumstances, there would be some room for manoeuvre on interest rates.’
      • ‘If we wanted to be sure of succeeding with the big ventures, we would have to act rapidly and ensure early on that we had given ourselves enough room for manoeuvre.’
      • ‘This created a little room for manoeuvre and sometimes even allowed limited state welfare measures to be introduced.’
      • ‘And the Christmas launch date appeared to leave the company little room for manoeuvre should anything go wrong.’
      • ‘Mitchell felt their ultimatum left Fifa with little room for manoeuvre.’
      • ‘There is perilously little room for manoeuvre in the group but the stage is set.’
      • ‘Again, I cannot interfere in that, but I need to know what they are doing, and I think there is therefore room for manoeuvre in that matter.’
      • ‘Worse than that, his predecessor had spent all the money, leaving him precious little room for manoeuvre.’
      • ‘But when the FBI or customs officers come calling, there is little room for manoeuvre.’
      • ‘Consumers have borrowed up to the hilt, leaving little room for manoeuvre should times get seriously tough.’
      • ‘Wingfield is a spacious property that offers plenty of room for manoeuvre, together with the obvious benefits of being in walk-in condition.’
      • ‘With national budget positions close to balance or in surplus, countries have ample room for manoeuvre to cope with adverse economic developments.’
      • ‘As in the US, there is a sense that the central bank's room for manoeuvre on interest rates is narrowing.’
      • ‘‘The majority of costs are wage costs; there is very little room for manoeuvre,’ he said.’
  • 2maneuversA large-scale military exercise of troops, warships, and other forces.

    ‘the Russian vessel was on maneuvers’
    • ‘The squadron went on maneuvers in August 1941 and was at a grass field at Fredericksburg, Virginia.’
    • ‘Navy spokesmen would not comment on whether more maneuvers are planned.’
    • ‘But its demands for regime change and its military manoeuvres are increasing tensions at the same time.’
    • ‘This year, for example, the military also plans to hold joint maneuvers with India.’
    • ‘This year's parade was unique since it involved military manoeuvres for the first time in 17 years.’
    • ‘The British Army is conducting military maneuvers on a remote Scottish moor when a fissure suddenly erupts.’
    • ‘These exercises are part of agreements on large military maneuvers involving the United States and the Philippines.’
    • ‘I spent 40 years in the Army, about six of them separated from my family and perhaps a couple more on maneuvers, training exercises and temporary duty.’
    • ‘The agreement ensures the Plain is protected despite increased military manoeuvres.’
    • ‘Changes in defence housing also reflect changes in the practice of warfare - from large manoeuvres to those involving small highly trained and specialised units.’
    • ‘This is a video taken from a U.S. Army helicopter on maneuvers.’
    • ‘Colourful uniforms had been replaced by khaki; heroic charges and defences by long-range shelling; and sweeping military manoeuvres by trench warfare.’
    • ‘When we Green Berets were in Alaska on maneuvers for a long time, nothing tasted better than hobo coffee.’
    • ‘Some of the payouts were quite clearly linked to accidents that took place during military manoeuvres.’
    • ‘The networks have focused on details of tactics, weapons and military manoeuvres.’
    • ‘In 1936, 1,200 men in the Red Army parachuted during manoeuvres near Kiev.’
    • ‘However, these men were used to working in small units and large scale manoeuvres were alien not only to them but to the officers in command of them.’
    • ‘Far too often biographers are obsessed with sex, courtly intrigue, or military manoeuvres.’
    • ‘Their success enabled the Allies to anticipate German military manoeuvres, saving thousands of lives and turning the tide of the war in the North Atlantic.’
    • ‘His film is narrowly focused on the scope of tactical military maneuvers.’
    training exercises, exercises, war games, operations
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verb

  • 1Move skillfully or carefully.

    no object ‘the truck was unable to maneuver comfortably in the narrow street’
    with object ‘I'm maneuvering a loaded tray around the floor’
    • ‘Jason rested his arm comfortably around Kirby's shoulder as she maneuvered herself to stand next to him.’
    • ‘The tiny cars were essential to the film's plot and proved to be the perfect getaway vehicles to manoeuvre in and out of tight spots and weave through seemingly impenetrable pathways.’
    • ‘They stepped quietly across the wet stone, maneuvering in pitch darkness as they listened for the movements of their enemy.’
    • ‘Rose awoke to the usual sounds of cars manoeuvring down the road, children playing in the park across the road and the chatting of women on the pavement below.’
    • ‘They were already moving; the ship could maneuver so smoothly that they hardly felt the change in speed.’
    • ‘I can remember as a child being fascinated by people who could maneuver those two wooden sticks like they were extensions of their hands.’
    • ‘It was crowded, and I had to maneuver around many people, but finally she led us into an empty corridor.’
    • ‘Sara had other ideas, however, and extended a leg high into the air to flick it up before manoeuvring to execute an exquisite overhead kick that flew past Francois Dubordeaux into the bottom right corner of his goal.’
    • ‘There was delight as Melissa maneuvered from limb to limb taking unnecessary risks with each move.’
    • ‘Up until this point almost all swords were heavy and required more strength than skill to maneuver.’
    • ‘For example, blind people can maneuver through unfamiliar areas with the aid of seeing-eye dogs or canes.’
    • ‘If there was time we manoeuvred to the outer edge as instructed, knowing that the slightest misjudgement by the driver might easily nudge us over the side.’
    • ‘I hate maneuvering around people with their carts parked diagonally across an aisle.’
    • ‘She maneuvered carefully so that she was beneath the liquid.’
    • ‘She stepped and maneuvered herself over people until she stood next to him.’
    • ‘The steering is light enough for manoeuvring, but maintains enough weight to give reassurance at speed on the open road.’
    • ‘A special tube is inserted into the patient's leg or arm and carefully manoeuvred to the artery needing attention.’
    • ‘Also, larger oars were heavy and clumsy to maneuver and required multiple oarsmen.’
    • ‘It took a couple of spins around Marble Arch and a brief stop in Belgrave Square to phone my brother for directions before I finally managed to manoeuvre onto Kensington Road.’
    • ‘These can range from narrow aisles to inadequate toilet facilities but for William his biggest headache is finding a suitable shopping trolley he can manoeuvre himself.’
    • ‘Carefully, the two maneuvered around the sleeping police chief and went into the office.’
    • ‘When that failed, leading firefighter Tom Warnock, who directed the operation, got the rescue boat to manoeuvre closer in the hope of shocking her into moving out of the silt.’
    • ‘Besides that it was annoying to have to maneuver through people who didn't know enough to get out of the way.’
    • ‘Patterson walked with him and moved to the table, as Chip maneuvered himself into a chair.’
    • ‘The strain, as a punter tries to manoeuvre a fully laden trolley around the end of an aisle is just colossal.’
    • ‘We maneuvered carefully across the gap in the rigging to cut the remainder of the sail free.’
    • ‘She was now approaching the bent wreckage of a hatchway door, so she slowed and maneuvered carefully around it.’
    • ‘Then she took a deep breath and carefully began to maneuver through the beams.’
    • ‘The car, which had its lights left on, was parked so close to the traffic lights on The Broadway that cars turning left had to manoeuvre round it.’
    • ‘Our initial mission required us to maneuver into a canyon and destroy two caves.’
    • ‘I maneuvered through the throng of innocent people; all unaware of the task I was about to perform.’
    • ‘The next several weeks Landon's recovery progressed to the point where he had some movement in his arms and could maneuver in a wheelchair.’
    • ‘From only a glimpse of its silhouetted form he spotted a barred owl, then carefully maneuvered for a closer view.’
    • ‘The larger the group gets the more emphasis you must place on moving yourself and spinning and maneuvering others away from you.’
    • ‘The people bustled so close together that it was impossible to maneuver without touching anyone.’
    • ‘I carefully maneuvered to the right-hand lane and then proceeded onto the shoulder.’
    • ‘The high pitched whine of the armoured cars as they manoeuvred round the narrow streets filled me with dread.’
    • ‘Always give yourself enough room to maneuver safely while avoiding both obstacles in the road and opening car doors.’
    • ‘When she reached her room, she maneuvered carefully around the contents of her floor and fell onto her bed.’
    • ‘Two separate people spilled beer on my head as they tried to maneuver around me, cursing me in the process for ruining a perfectly good pint.’
    steer, guide, drive, negotiate, navigate, pilot, direct, manipulate, move, work, jockey
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  • 2with object and adverbial Carefully guide or manipulate (someone or something) in order to achieve an end.

    ‘they were maneuvering him into a betrayal of his countryman’
    • ‘They are forever busy manipulating and maneuvering situations to their advantage.’
    • ‘In response, she sought to manoeuvre his own people ahead of his supporters in the lists.’
    • ‘Along the way he's manoeuvred a group of marginal seat holders into more powerful positions.’
    intrigue, plot, scheme, plan, lay plans, conspire, pull strings
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    1. 2.1no object Carefully manipulate a situation to achieve an end.
      ‘two decades of political maneuvering’
      • ‘What can we expect from the conservatives in this configuration of great potential power combined with extremely narrow room to manoeuvre?’
      • ‘In other words, Bulgaria will again have to diplomatically maneuver and make its choice in a vulnerable situation.’
      • ‘By 1987 it was clear that the grieving period was over as politicians manoeuvred for supremacy.’
      • ‘They see politics as people making deals, people maneuvering for advantage, people acting.’
      • ‘No wonder the pre-election atmosphere can now be felt, particularly because the political elite have started maneuvering to serve their own and their groups' interests.’
      • ‘As interest groups stepped up their lobbying, the political parties continued maneuvering in advance of a potential Senate vote to bar the filibusters.’
      • ‘A party which is willing to sacrifice any or all of its policy preferences will have more room to manoeuvre than a competitor who gets stuck on a principle.’
      • ‘And now we have this situation where you have these various religious factions, these other people who are maneuvering for position now.’
      • ‘To develop success achieved in an offensive one has to maneuver so that to build up efforts in the main sector.’
      • ‘The ruling class may jettison figureheads who have served their interests for years, but they organise and manoeuvre to ensure their rule is restabilised.’
      • ‘In an attempt to remedy this situation over the past decade the United States, Britain and France have each manoeuvred to gain greater influence on the continent.’
      • ‘We have no confidence in its leaders, who've manipulated and maneuvered against our civic initiate for years.’
      manipulate, contrive, manage, engineer, devise, plan, plot, fix, organize, arrange, set up, orchestrate, choreograph, stage-manage
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Origin

Mid 18th century (as a noun in the sense ‘tactical movement’): from French manœuvre (noun), manœuvrer (verb), from medieval Latin manuoperare from Latin manus ‘hand’ + operari ‘to work’.

Pronunciation

maneuver

/məˈno͞ovər//məˈnuvər/