Definition of managerialism in US English:

managerialism

noun

  • Belief in or reliance on the use of professional managers in administering or planning an activity.

    • ‘It is an ideology that is backed by managerialism, the belief that commercial management principles have the answers to all organisational problems.’
    • ‘That is why this new year presents a crucial opportunity to get beyond managerialism, targets and struggling to catch up with public expectations.’
    • ‘If pragmatic managerialism was the order of the day what was the role of politics?’
    • ‘In the context of higher education, the Jarrett Report provided a boost to the introduction of managerialism.’
    • ‘While the plague of managerialism exists more or less everywhere and is therefore no longer all that remarkable, the interesting thing about its stranglehold on science is that in many ways the researchers have brought it on themselves.’
    • ‘As somebody believing that managerialism is inimical to professionalism, I find this theory entirely plausible.’
    • ‘Later, he used morality on the international stage to dress up a government bogged down in managerialism and public-sector reform.’
    • ‘In the 1990s, however, as managerialism began to dominate the university, translucence and opaqueness replaced transparency.’
    • ‘I reason that university presidents with business or economics backgrounds should be more likely than others to embrace managerialism.’
    • ‘I see managerialism as a virus which has as its main attribute the destruction of altruism and of individual clinical and scholarly activity.’
    • ‘However, these huge, transformative, ideologically dividing policies are rather hard to find, particularly since we have entered a period of post-ideological managerialism.’
    • ‘ABC radio, while not immune to managerialism, was exempt from the worst excesses because of the hands-on and immediate nature of its medium.’
    • ‘But the end of political ideology and the rise of managerialism has come at a price: the parties have to spend large sums of money seeking to differentiate their product, using the full array of modern marketing and advertising techniques.’
    • ‘How does the rhetoric of managerialism influence actors’ perceptions about the ultimate goals of Portuguese higher education?’
    • ‘This trend has been called the new managerialism.’
    • ‘It is characterised by an inherent and limiting managerialism.’
    • ‘The managerialism of the current university system has meant that Internet-based pedagogy has been focussed on design issues, rather than rationale, intentions or applications.’
    • ‘But his personal asceticism and disdain for the managerialism of modern politics brought its own difficulties.’
    • ‘During the 1980s a new species of managerialism moved into companies and into research management.’
    • ‘The dangers of further intensifications of managerialism are considerable.’

Pronunciation

managerialism

/ˌmanəˈjirēəlizəm/