Definition of magnetic in US English:

magnetic

adjective

  • 1Exhibiting or relating to magnetism.

    ‘the clock has a magnetic back to stick to the fridge’
    ‘an airborne magnetic survey’
    • ‘If you don't, gluing may be a little troublesome as not many types of glue will stick to the magnetic material very well.’
    • ‘Airline companies were also being warned because the magnetic burst could affect navigational systems.’
    • ‘The sample was under constant stirring with a magnetic bar during the measurements.’
    • ‘Marie had already published one paper on the magnetic properties of steel.’
    • ‘We are currently planning a proper geological survey of as many magnetic mountains as possible.’
    • ‘The composition of the weld metal is similar to that of the base metal and tailored for low magnetic permeability.’
    • ‘He sees lots of possible uses, such as lubricants, semiconductors in flat-panel displays, and non-metallic magnetic materials.’
    • ‘To date, there is no reliable measure of magnetic strength based on size and material used.’
    • ‘With a magnetic belt capable of separating out the rebar iron from the concrete, it ground the concrete to gravel.’
    • ‘The small magnetic key slid into the ignition slot and completed the battery-powered engine circuit.’
    • ‘Based on diffusion theory, they calculated the magnetic particles in the glass to be about 1000 atoms across.’
    • ‘When I spoke to Howse on the telephone I was not aware that the magnetic powder had to stick to the insect because it was not described in the newspaper article.’
    • ‘Basic research into the electrical and thermal properties of metallic, magnetic and organic materials is leading to the discovery of novel superconductors.’
    • ‘And the dozens of Atlantis exercise machines each sport a small magnetic plaque with a verse of scripture.’
    • ‘Galileo will take pictures, measure magnetic forces, and study dust and smaller particles.’
    • ‘A surprising magnetic property of glass may explain what makes helium bottles so variable.’
    • ‘He concluded that light itself was a propagating wave of electric and magnetic energy, an undulation that moved outward in all directions from its source.’
    • ‘The cameras and magnetic strip readers were stuck to the ATMs and looked like original parts.’
    • ‘The researchers used a magnetic coil technique to measure with high accuracy and speed the eye movements of the subjects.’
    • ‘Below a big art nouveau mirror there's a gas fire with a magnetic piper stuck to it, an indication of his Scottish roots.’
    • ‘The new method entails the use of injectable magnetic fluids that would be capable of repairing all areas of the retina.’
    • ‘His magnetic boots stuck to the floor a bit longer than a normal shoe would have, but then again, with normal shoes, Patrick would be floating.’
    • ‘Such processing efforts have led to determinations of satellite magnetic anomalies of the Earth.’
    • ‘The impact changed the magnetic properties of the comet, and this could have affected mobile telephony here on Earth.’
    • ‘When waves cause the coil to move up and down relative to the fixed magnetic shaft, voltage is induced and electricity is generated.’
    • ‘The material, being a mixture rather than a compound, retains the transparent and lightweight properties of the aerogel, as well as the magnetic properties of the magnetic particles.’
    • ‘Magnetic resonance imaging uses the body's natural magnetic properties to produce detailed images from any part of the body.’
    • ‘Spacecraft that visit Jupiter must be designed to remain unaffected by this powerful magnetic field.’
    • ‘His heavy anti-radiation suit made it a bit hard to move, but the magnetic shoes stuck him to the surface like glue.’
    • ‘What was wrong, you wondered, with those nice magnetic charts with stick on clouds and smiley sunshines?’
    • ‘The magnetic interaction between the applied field and the eddy currents acts to slow the wheels down.’
    • ‘Of course, no silent operation is possible at this fan rotation speed, even though it is built with magnetic bearings.’
    • ‘Upcoming experiments will explore how magnetic properties change when atoms are brought together into small groups and in different geometries.’
    • ‘In the 1990's many women began to create photo albums that were more than simply photos stuck in magnetic albums.’
    • ‘In addition all the electric motors are of low magnetic material content and have compensated stray fields.’
    • ‘The techniques of magnetostratigraphy make use of the stratigraphical variations in the magnetic properties of rocks as a basis for correlation.’
    • ‘The magnetic properties of some crystalline substances change drastically when they are subjected to pressure along one direction of the crystal.’
    • ‘Samarium-cobalt magnets retain their magnetic properties at high temperatures and are not very reactive.’
    • ‘Geologists have determined that rocks found in different parts of the planet with similar ages have the same magnetic characteristics.’
    • ‘He even worked out the speed these waves would travel, which was related to the ratio of certain electrical and magnetic properties.’
    1. 1.1 Capable of being attracted by or acquiring the properties of a magnet.
      ‘steel is magnetic’
      • ‘In this case the young experimenters see that one of the little nails stays attracted when the battery is disconnected and understand that the magnetic effect somehow stays in the electromagnet.’
      • ‘The earliest soft magnetic material was iron, which contained many impurities.’
      • ‘Silicon steel is undoubtedly the most important soft magnetic material in use today.’
      • ‘The results help researchers better understand magnetic switching and may help designers optimize magnetic storage devices.’
      • ‘That is that it is attracted by the magnetic field but does not remain magnetic once it leaves the field.’
      • ‘Most materials are not ferromagnetic, but there are a variety of magnetic effects that other materials exhibit.’
      • ‘The magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnetic material is inversely proportional to absolute temperature.’
  • 2(of a bearing in navigation) measured relative to magnetic north.

    • ‘Path comes and goes, compass bearing is 255 degrees magnetic.’
    • ‘My friends and colleagues who are interested in alignments say they keep finding things which point towards either 125 degrees magnetic or to its diametric opposite (125+180= 305).’
    • ‘When geomagnetic activity is low, the aurora typically is located, in the hours around midnight, at about 67 degrees magnetic latitude.’
    • ‘If you were carrying a hand-bearing compass you could have made a note of the other vessel's magnetic relative bearing and checked it again every few minutes.’
  • 3Very attractive or alluring.

    ‘his magnetic personality’
    • ‘There was some magnetic force pulling me toward him - as though we were in the eye of a tornado, pushing us closer and closer together.’
    • ‘In the end, the magnetic pull of opera is strong even to those who, unlike MacMillan, are not openly ‘fascinated by the make-believe world of the opera’.’
    • ‘His magnetic personality has the capacity to enchant fellow men.’
    • ‘But beneath that magnetic charm lies a hard core of determination and inner strength.’
    • ‘One could feel the magnetic pull of the Bay Area from 150 miles away, as traffic thickened in the standing heat.’
    • ‘He was a magnetic coach who attracted hundreds of acolytes.’
    • ‘When you combine all this glamour with their high intelligence and magnetic personalities, your dog will be the envy of the neighborhood.’
    • ‘My siblings all had magnetic personalities and made friends easily, but I didn't.’
    • ‘He already has won over teammates with his magnetic personality.’
    • ‘By everyone's account, he was an exceptionally bright and perceptive child with a magnetic personality.’
    • ‘There was something about Isabelle's personality that was magnetic - people were just drawn to her, including Corey.’
    • ‘The guy has been called magnetic, mesmerizing, captivating, sharply political and, most importantly, fun.’
    • ‘If you can break away from the magnetic pull of the music, visit the excellent, almost impromptu street markets which spring up at different hours in different daily locations.’
    • ‘Tigers are alluring animals and stories about them always have a magnetic appeal.’
    • ‘In fact, David Hasselhoff is a man of such magnetic charisma that women literally throw themselves out of high-storey windows to attract his attention.’
    • ‘He was reminded of the previous night's events and glanced curiously to the window, a magnetic force pulling his head in that direction.’
    • ‘Despite her vehement decision to completely ignore Scott Pearce for the evening, a kind of magnetic pull forced Danielle to turn and look at him.’
    • ‘From every act, from every word of the persona he has presented to the camera since the early 1970s, there emanates at once a mediocrity and a magnetic allure.’
    • ‘He had the looks, the magnetic charmed personality, access to money, and the power to take whatever he wanted, often without question or repercussion.’
    • ‘In reality, the combination in a woman of a charming or magnetic personality and even moderate good looks often makes her appear far more attractive than a woman who is considered outright beautiful.’
    alluring, attractive, fascinating, captivating, enchanting, enthralling, appealing, charming, prepossessing, engaging, entrancing, tempting, tantalizing, seductive, inviting, irresistible, magic, magical, bewitching, charismatic, hypnotic, mesmeric
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century: from late Latin magneticus, from Latin magneta (see magnet).

Pronunciation

magnetic

/mæɡˈnɛdɪk//maɡˈnedik/