Definition of magic spell in US English:

magic spell

noun

  • 1A form of words used as a magical charm or incantation.

    ‘the creature was protected by the magic spells of its mistress’
    • ‘The bad guys kidnap the good guys, steal their treasure chest, and the wise man has to save the day with a magic spell.’
    • ‘In some instances, characters have their own unique magic spells.’
    • ‘Street conjurers, tattooed with magic spells, roamed throughout the ancient world.’
    • ‘He outwits Ronald and his friends with a magic spell which makes him invisible, and blasts off before they have a chance to stop him.’
    • ‘From thence he made his way to Egypt - there, if possible, to learn the art of working wonders by magic spells.’
    • ‘Like miracles, magic spells seem to defy natural laws (e.g. gravity).’
    • ‘He is well versed in magic spells and often calls upon them to save his comrades.’
    • ‘Working within the confining definitions of black and white magic, this would be a black magic spell.’
    • ‘The nation's first legal magic spell society was formed yesterday, after a 17-year fight to obtain government approval.’
    • ‘As depicted in a variety of Chinese-language thrillers, magic spells are cast by drawing special words or symbols on a piece of paper or in the air.’
    1. 1.1 A state of enchantment caused by or as if by a magic spell.
      ‘the place casts a magic spell on tourists’
      • ‘He had six wins on the trot as manager, only for Brighton to break the magic spell with a 2-2 draw at the City Ground.’
      • ‘In that respect New York weaves a kind of magic spell on its inhabitants.’
      • ‘New media have lost their magic spell; the once so glamorous gadgets are becoming part of everyday life.’
      • ‘The advertising arts will cast their magic spell over Shanghai audiences again.’
      • ‘Love is in the air and its magic spell is everywhere - especially during the weekend Aries Moon.’
      • ‘For a brief while, as the pleasant music wove a magic spell, listeners seemed to forget their nationalities, geographical boundaries, and cultural upbringing.’