Definition of magian in US English:

magian

(also Magian)

adjective

  • 1Relating to the magi of ancient Persia.

    • ‘He showed that similar horoscopes in the Magian or Chaldaean system had been described in ancient times for Roman emperors such as Augustus, Tiberius, and Hadrian.’
    • ‘That was until they banded together and retaliated against the magian hierarchy, launched military attacks against them, then migrated westward, out of Persia and Iran.’
    • ‘Lady - you must understand - that door is Magian work - even one as skilled as myself finds it difficult to force open…’
    • ‘Historian Grundy, like Thucydides, completely ignores the Greek and Magian worldviews.’
    • ‘That is why, during the time of Darius, the war of independence was fought for the protection of Magian religion from the Zoroastrian religion.’
    1. 1.1 Relating to the Magi who brought gifts to the infant Jesus.
      • ‘Beyond the river Euphrates the magians lived; and they were wise, could read the language of the stars, and they divined that one, a master soul, was born; they saw his star above Jerusalem.’

noun

  • A magus or Magus.

    • ‘The sacerdotal and learned class were styled magians or magicians.’
    • ‘Originally, the Magians had neither temples, altars, nor religious symbols of any kind.’
    • ‘Hence, the conjecture of Imam Farahi seems to be true that these people were called Sabeans (Magians) because of their adeptness in astrology and their acquaintance with the influences of stars and heavenly bodies.’
    • ‘The question remains as to whether the same ruling applies to the Magians that applies to the Jews and Christians.’
    • ‘He travelled a great deal in the region, coming into contact with Christians, Jews, Magians and pagans of every stripe.’
    • ‘For instance, Herodotus states explicitly that the Magians were a Median tribe.’
    wizard, witch, sorcerer, warlock, magician, necromancer, spellbinder, magus, conjuror
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

magian

/ˈmāj(ē)ən/