Definition of maestro in English:

maestro

noun

  • 1A distinguished musician, especially a conductor of classical music.

    • ‘The conductor is one of the finest opera maestros from the past quarter century, all of the selections are performed with supporting singers and chorus as needed, and the booklet contains full texts and translations.’
    • ‘He spent the rest of his life there, as maestro, organist, and a highly respected teacher; his pupils included the royal children.’
    • ‘While hard-core music lovers will not want to lose this opportunity to watch maestros perform, even those who are yet to be initiated into the complexity of Indian classical music will find the event compelling.’
    • ‘Piano maestro Lucy McLellan will host a classical music concert at Bradford Grammar School to raise funds for charity Teenage Cancer Trust.’
    • ‘The orchestra's rapport with the conductor was more alive and responsive than it is with most guest maestros.’
    • ‘No doubt that means we are due for some emotional farewells as the departing maestros of those orchestras come to town and bid us adieu.’
    • ‘The open day coincided with normal rehearsals and visitors were able to sit in as the young musical maestros performed.’
    • ‘Starting next season, the affable maestro will be the musical director of the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra.’
    • ‘This was the era when sitar maestro Ravi Shankar and several other Indian artists performed in Europe and America.’
    • ‘Veteran Berlin players implore other maestros to lead them in Brahms.’
    • ‘Within three years, Powell's opus received some fifty performances under such maestros as Sir Donald Francis Tovey, Pierre Monteux and Walter Damrosch.’
    • ‘Angel Romero is known as a guitar maestro and conductor.’
    • ‘Martin Hayes is a fiddle maestro and Denis Cahill is a superb guitarist.’
    • ‘If there is one artist who put Hindustani classical music on the world map it is sitar maestro Pundit Ravi Shankar.’
    • ‘In the old-world record industry, a Beethoven cycle was the highest accolade that could be granted to a maestro.’
    • ‘Only three maestros in history - Mahler, Boulez and Bernstein - have achieved commensurate recognition as composers, and all three were composers before they began to conduct.’
    • ‘Great maestros treated their musical knowledge as family property.’
    • ‘Anthony Garcia travelled to Mexico in 1994 where he studied with several maestros, participated in master classes with virtuoso guitarists and received many awards.’
    • ‘This event originated as a private music soirée over half a century ago, and has grown into an important event on India's classical music calendar featuring all-night performances and showcasing maestros as well as new talent.’
    • ‘The maestro is conducting at Tanglewood with the Boston Symphony Orchestra.’
    conductor, director
    virtuoso, master, expert, genius, wizard, prodigy
    ace, whizz, ninja
    dab hand
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A great or distinguished figure in any sphere.
      ‘a movie maestro’
      • ‘Midfield maestro Christian Fox has given York City a massive summer boost after revealing he hopes to make a sooner than expected return to action.’
      • ‘While O'Sullivan took some heart from the fact that his midfield maestros walked, rather than hobbled, onto the return flight from Rome yesterday, he is acutely aware that where hamstrings are concerned, there are no quick fixes.’
      • ‘In addition, the illusion of him as economic maestro had finally evaporated.’
      • ‘Brave two-year-old George Mitchell proved he is made of strong stuff as he took on two of Swindon Town's midfield maestros at the County Ground this week.’
      • ‘This is the age of the unusual: extraordinary, genius, maestro, whiz, superwhiz.’
      • ‘Yet the veteran National Hunt maestro continues to work away training winners and searching for potential champions.’
      • ‘I was thinking of Hoddle the legend, the midfield maestro who could unlock defences within a moment.’
      • ‘Listen: now it is the symphony of sport, and today, I am your maestro, conducting.’
      • ‘Zidane is a masterful maestro in the midfield with astonishing moves and is truly a legend among legends.’
      • ‘The defiant defenders and magical midfield maestros will always be popular with the fans but nothing sticks in the mind more than the moment you saw your striker place the ball past the opposition keeper.’
      • ‘Even more candidly, the maestro of Tudor court books and ceremonies last studied Anglo-Saxon history, he admits, as a schoolboy.’
      • ‘According to those who know about these things, the very professional maestros from Meadowlands are firm favourites to retain their crown.’
      • ‘Yet Mendieta has shown no desire to leave the club that made him a star, for it was at Valencia that he graduated from awkward full-back into a midfield maestro.’
      • ‘Speaking of which, I finally sent copies to veteran comics maestros Steve Ditko and Alex Toth on Tuesday.’
      • ‘Jamie is well-known for being a bit of a maestro on the harmonica.’
      • ‘Midfield maestro Jimmy Gore, from Acomb, put in a man-of-the-match display, despite nerves over his pregnant wife.’
      • ‘Moreover, individuals who excel in a specialized area like polling or fieldwork typically try to migrate to higher-paying, higher-prestige work as strategists and message maestros.’
      • ‘The news prompted web design maestro and author Jeffrey Zeldman to Pop a cap.’
      • ‘‘It was a magnificent performance by the old maestro in midfield,’ the manager said.’
      • ‘He also used his growing fame to ensure that the Hong Kong maestro made his next movie in America.’

Origin

Early 18th century: Italian, master from Latin magister.

Pronunciation:

maestro

/ˈmīstrō/