Definition of machicolate in US English:

machicolate

adjective

usually as adjective machicolated
  • with object Provide with machicolations.

    ‘a machicolated fortress’
    • ‘An enceinte marked by the towers and machicolated balconies stretches along the Seine in front of the château.’
    • ‘This tower was raised thirty-three feet by Sir Jeffry Wyatville, crowned with a machicolated battlement, and surmounted with a flag-tower.’
    • ‘With its great round bastions and tall machicolated towers, Lahore station may look as if it is the product of some short lived collaboration between the Raj and the Diney Corporation.’
    • ‘Just below the machicolated parapet there are traces of the older crenellations.’
    • ‘The carefully wrought and fully detailed weather vane, set high above the machicolated parapets of the building, at once attracts attention.’
    • ‘The first step is to recognise what is going on, and to take steps to shore up the machicolated and moth-eaten institution in which I now sit.’
    • ‘One enters the court of arms through a door with a pointed arch defended by a machicolated gallery above.’
    • ‘The cornices are machicolated, though nobody expects to pour hot lead from the machicoulis.’
    • ‘It is a small machicolated, projecting loggia used for defense.’
    • ‘The balcony can be reached by two bridges projecting from squat, machicolated towers - the houses have now been demolished, but the gallery remains.’
    • ‘Each corner of these square towers is again surmounted by a projecting octagon turret, machicolated.’
    • ‘This imposing monument is strongly guarded with its round machicolated towers bearing terraces for the artillery.’

Origin

Late 18th century: from Anglo-Latin machicollare, based on Provençal machacol, from macar ‘to crush’ + col ‘neck’.

Pronunciation

machicolate

/məˈCHikəˌlāt/