Main definitions of lurch in English

: lurch1lurch2

lurch1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Make an abrupt, unsteady, uncontrolled movement or series of movements; stagger.

    ‘the car lurched forward’
    ‘Stuart lurched to his feet’
    figurative ‘he was lurching from one crisis to the next’
    • ‘She's leaving us in a fortnight so we ended up having a polite chat in the porch as I made lurching movements towards the car.’
    • ‘I groped for the gear stick, sobbing desperately as the car lurched forward.’
    • ‘Waiting at a junction, a driver in the lane next to mine lurched out of his car door and was violently sick on the road.’
    • ‘Rocketing to his feet, then swaying as his head lurched, Kaerin staggered over to the long full size mirror.’
    • ‘I sat in the front car and the roller coaster went on an immediate descent, lurching forward at top speed.’
    • ‘Unsteadied, she struggled to regain her balance and lurched forward.’
    • ‘Asked to raise one leg, he lurched forward into the officer in front of him.’
    • ‘The English passengers screamed as the ship lurched and pitched in the storm.’
    • ‘I shrieked, once again lurching forward and grabbing Lash by the back of his beat up concert shirt.’
    • ‘At times the dancers push themselves or others forward, lurching toward a brighter future.’
    • ‘So in a cloud of dust, the taxi lurched forward, throwing me back into my seat at the back.’
    • ‘Then, the line lurched forward and we began progressing further towards the studio.’
    • ‘There was such a struggle that the car lurched onto the pavement.’
    • ‘After trying to keep from lurching forward from his sharp hit, I looked around.’
    • ‘There was a loudish bang and her car lurched forward with the impact.’
    • ‘The car lurched forward as Rob threw it into drive and raced for the western exit.’
    • ‘He let out an angry bellow before once again leaping to his feet and lurching forward.’
    • ‘She held on tightly to the side of her seat as the carriage lurched into movement.’
    • ‘The car lurched gently beneath her feet and began to rise as the weight of the second began to descend under gravity.’
    • ‘We lurched up a series of rough, stepped rock pavements to access the plateau above the falaise.’
    stagger, stumble, sway, reel, roll, weave, totter, flounder, falter, wobble, slip, move clumsily
    sway, reel, list, roll, pitch, toss, keel, veer, labour, flounder, heel, swerve, make heavy weather
    View synonyms

noun

  • [usually in singular] An abrupt uncontrolled movement, especially an unsteady tilt or roll.

    ‘the boat gave a violent lurch, and he missed his footing’
    • ‘As she jumped up, Moby made a lurch to grab her but missed.’
    • ‘Their lurch to the Left was disastrous for them at the last election.’
    • ‘He was hit with a sudden flash of vertigo, and his stomach rolled over in a lazy lurch.’
    • ‘Alcohol was banned, minority Islamic sects were outlawed and the lurch to the right began.’
    • ‘However, she felt a sudden lurch in her stomach as she came to an abrupt stop.’
    • ‘A second goal was in the air and Ruud van Nistelrooy went looking for it with a melodramatic lurch to the ground in search of a penalty.’
    • ‘Try having that for the best part of several weeks, with the occasional lurch in either direction.’
    • ‘The lurch to the right is regrettable, but it's perhaps not the business of the rest of the world.’
    • ‘Suddenly there was a great lurch, and he slid to the end of his cage.’
    • ‘The first minister's lurch to populist authoritarianism is obscuring a success story, one in which law and order policies seem to be working.’
    • ‘But she's too drunk to keep her balance and the momentum of the lurch is enough to send her sprawling.’
    • ‘The irony is that a lurch to the left might actually prolong the inevitable fall of this medieval institution.’
    • ‘A brief lurch and we moved: bumping over mud, then smoothly over deeper snow.’
    • ‘The only thing he succeeded in was causing a great lurch and a tremor.’
    • ‘The tank's engine rose and pitch, and gave a sudden lurch as the treads sprung to life.’
    • ‘As the articles indicate, it is this crisis, in the final analysis, that lies behind the lurch to war and dictatorial forms of rule.’
    • ‘Wrenching sideways, I feel the rope make a sudden lurch down, frightening me.’
    • ‘There was the lurch of takeoff and the coffee and pastries I'd had during the meeting got friendly with parts of my body I'd rather they stayed clear of.’
    • ‘Her eyes, dark and brooding, her body language - a little stoop here, a little lurch there - says it all.’
    • ‘As Kwenn reached him, the ship gave a sudden, violent lurch to one side.’

Origin

Late 17th century (as a noun denoting the sudden leaning of a ship to one side): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

lurch

/lərCH/

Main definitions of lurch in English

: lurch1lurch2

lurch2

noun

in phrase leave someone in the lurch
  • Leave an associate or friend abruptly and without assistance or support in a difficult situation.

    • ‘But he fails to account for why the Austrian government labelled them as criminals and left them in the lurch.’
    • ‘Some of the ‘cool’ people will leave you in the lurch or betray your friends; at least one of the people you can't stand will prove to be a loyal, courageous, and inspiring friend.’
    • ‘We have received a very apologetic letter about the closure of the West End Club, but it really left us in the lurch.’
    • ‘Anyway, the cow has left me in the lurch and now I have to do her work (which was originally mine which I foisted on her) as well as my own.’
    • ‘Elderly people in Little Hulton were left in the lurch when the local launderette closed - meaning a one and a half mile trek to the nearest facilities.’
    • ‘Kelu departed forthwith, despite the guru's curse for leaving him in the lurch.’
    • ‘Mr Littlehales added: ‘They are offering peanuts and leaving us in the lurch.’’
    • ‘But after the Soviets were defeated in Afghanistan, we were left in the lurch.’
    • ‘Santa's reindeer left him in the lurch when they abandoned him on a church roof, leaving firemen to come to the rescue.’
    • ‘The defendant was said to have turned to fraud when Mr Moore left her in the lurch and she was struggling to pay the mortgage on her pension, the court was told.’
    abandon, desert, leave, leave high and dry, turn one's back on, cast aside, break with, break up with
    jilt, strand, leave stranded, throw over
    run out on, walk out on, dump, ditch
    give someone the push, give someone the elbow, give someone the big e, bin off
    forsake
    leave in trouble, let down, leave helpless, leave stranded, leave high and dry, abandon, desert, betray
    bail on
    forsake
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century (denoting a state of discomfiture): from French lourche, the name of a game resembling backgammon, used in the phrase demeurer lourche be discomfited.

Pronunciation:

lurch

/lərCH/