Main definitions of lupine in English

: lupine1lupine2

lupine1

(British lupin)

noun

  • A plant of the pea family with deeply divided leaves and tall colorful tapering spikes of flowers.

    • ‘Its perennial plants are complemented by azaleas, hydrangeas and lupins in pots.’
    • ‘The classic perennial lupines, with flower spikes that tower above their foliage like colorful candles, just got better.’
    • ‘Roses are beginning to bloom, delphiniums are tall and lupins dot the beds with their spikes of bright colour.’
    • ‘Planted along with traditional peonies, irises and chrysanthemums, are lupines, veronicas and Canterbury bells, a contemporary feature rarely seen in Japanese gardens.’
    • ‘Blue lupins flowered in the olive groves; the fields had the earth-smell of new beginnings.’
    • ‘The first is that you have been strong-minded enough to cut back the early herbaceous plants such as oriental poppies, delphiniums, geraniums and lupins.’
    • ‘The students planted their homegrown lupines on land managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service near the Concord airport, a protected area which was recently expanded by 400 acres.’
    • ‘Some perennials are relatively short-lived; lupines and primroses, for example, may live for only 2 to 5 years, though the seed they drop often produces new plants.’
    • ‘Around the barn a flagged terrace is encircled by cottage garden plants, such as delphiniums, rambling roses, geraniums, dianthus and lupins.’
    • ‘From the living room, family room, and my desk in the office, you look past the dwarf pine trees and lupines to the bay.’
    • ‘Finally the willow tree was heavily pruned and the Euonymus and three lupins were planted.’
    • ‘Enjoy lobelia, lupins and delphiniums while you can.’
    • ‘Other gardeners prefer to interplant them with spring flowers such as columbines, daisies, dianthus, Iceland poppies, lupines, and peonies.’
    • ‘Items to be covered include options in crop sequences, wheat breeding directions, tramline farming, potential for durum wheats, lupins and various pests and their control.’
    • ‘Then came perennial beds with roses, lilies, foxgloves, lupines, daisies, shrubs, and more.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, out on the patio, the sole survivor of the six lupins we planted last year has produced a splendid spear of pale pink blossom.’
    • ‘I want blooming roses, daisies, tritoma, canna, coreopsis, sweet william, lobelia, lupins, gypsophilia, pansies, and the like.’
    • ‘The slugs also preferred the leaves of lucerne, white clover and lupins, to the wheat plants.’
    • ‘Their curiosity got the better of them when they noticed that, unlike other crops, plants in the legume family - beans, peas, alfalfa, lupines, vetch - thrived even in nitrogen-deficient soils.’
    • ‘It is recommended that gardeners use transplants rather than seeds for growing bluebonnets and other species of hybrid lupines in their gardens.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin lupinus.

Pronunciation

lupine

/ˈlupɪn//ˈlo͞opin/

Main definitions of lupine in English

: lupine1lupine2

lupine2

adjective

  • Of, like, or relating to a wolf or wolves.

    ‘a lupine howl’
    • ‘The Wolf spent his downtime in lupine form, as constantly transforming back and forth gave him a hangover.’
    • ‘Arranged in concentric circles, the houses of The Den were well-distanced from each other, perhaps owing to the werewolves' lupine need for space to run around in.’
    • ‘Two young women howl at the moon in this likeable dark comedy about getting in touch with your lupine side.’
    • ‘Charging a measly 20 bucks, Canada's favourite lupine hippie rocked a sold-out audience at das Kool Haus for pretty close to an hour and 45 minutes.’
    • ‘When she was in lupine form, she was, unsurprisingly, a black wolf, and not a very big one really, but tense and coiled as a well-oiled metal spring, and twice as powerful as any.’
    • ‘The girls get their costumes ripped off by the lupine guy in the white jacket and ripped jeans.’
    • ‘They argued that the lupine fantasy could be seen as a fundamental challenge to Western notions of subjectivity.’
    • ‘When a vampire bites a werewolf, the vampire and wolf will die, because lupine blood is undrinkable, and the werewolf has a nasty reaction to the vampire's fangs.’
    • ‘He scowled at the amount of blood decorating the floor in front of the wolf and then roughly grabbed the back of the lupine captain's head.’
    • ‘In the Scottish Highlands, environmental campaigners and landowners wrangled over the possibility of reintroducing wolves to a landscape devoid of lupine presence since the 1700s.’
    • ‘The closest I can come to describing his psychosis is that Peter believes that he is a werewolf, without any of the lupine transformation normally associated with that legend.’
    • ‘The young doctor was crouching in the middle of the floor staring at the shattered remains of a glass vial, her lupine tail lashing.’
    • ‘It is striking to reflect upon how overwhelmingly male the cast is: every character in the text, excluding the husband in his lupine form and the wife, is a man.’
    • ‘His name is Nick Dickory, and he has lupine features.’
    • ‘Timis, the alpha bitch in her pack, was a savvy survivor, and she opened his eyes to the range of lupine resourcefulness in Romania.’
    • ‘Ogre emerged sporting a large lupine mask, flanked by Key on a synth riser, a live drummer and a guitarist wielding a double-necked axe straight out of a Thor video.’
    • ‘Critics have railed against bouts of apparent disingenuousness, self-absorption and the singer's lupine cries of a last chapter.’
    • ‘The latter was fiercely jealous, and if Parsons showed obvious affection toward someone, Patsy howled as though she were calling upon all her lupine ancestors to come forth and carry off the intruder.’
    • ‘With media attention hitting fever pitch, a strangely lupine man called Wolf decides to take up the hunt, interrupting Dusty's incompetent press conference.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from Latin lupinus, from lupus ‘wolf’.

Pronunciation

lupine

/ˈluˌpaɪn//ˈlo͞oˌpīn/