Definition of lumpsucker in English:



  • A globular fish of cooler northern waters, typically having a ventral sucker and spiny fins; a lumpfish.

    • ‘Small projections or denticles are also commonly observed on suckers from a variety of other animals including the suckers of the clingfish, the lumpsuckers and other aquatic vertebrates and on tadpoles.’
    • ‘This is a kelp forest: few fish, but sightings of ghost shrimp, lumpsucker, scorpionfish, nudibranchs, comb jellyfish and isopods can be expected.’
    • ‘He had found two large lumpsuckers lodged between two stones.’
    • ‘One of the strangest fish you might encounter in spring is the male lumpsucker, which is left in shallow water guarding and nurturing his egg clutch after mating.’
    • ‘Pink shrimps and flatfish abound, and brightly coloured juvenile lumpsuckers stick to the kelp fronds.’
    • ‘Where else can you find anglerfish, dogfish, giant cuttlefish and lumpsuckers?’
    • ‘Fish life generally is a bit sparse in the North Sea, but there are several relatively unusual species that favour this cooler water - you may come across lumpsucker, Norwegian topknot, yarrell's blenny and the spectacular wolf-fish.’
    • ‘For those who dive mainly western and southern shores, there are several species you might not have come across before, such as lumpsucker, the rather aggressive-looking wolf-fish and cod.’
    • ‘The weather was promising, the tides along the South Coast were right and I had taken to the road in search of a strange fish called a lumpsucker, which Wittering Divers said I could find on the wreck of a Mulberry Harbour off Bognor Regis.’
    • ‘It looks more like a lumpsucker, but that's the problem with local common names.’
    • ‘A diver admires a gully wall covered in plumose anemones, the sought-after wolf-fish a long-clawed squat lobster, a male lumpsucker on egg-guarding duty, and colorful soft corals.’
    • ‘After all, occasionally I get to see something special like a lumpsucker, and these drifts are infinitely better than the even-scabbier ledges to be found on Lulworth banks.’