Main definitions of lump in English

: lump1lump2

lump1

noun

  • 1A compact mass of a substance, especially one without a definite or regular shape.

    ‘there was a lump of ice floating in the milk’
    • ‘A statue, for instance, is a kind of object which, unlike a lump of bronze, cannot survive much change to its shape.’
    • ‘We go to London to talks to a geologist at the Natural History Museum about meteors and a lump of what might be the moon which landed on the Nullabor Plain in Australia.’
    • ‘Jumping on my bed, I found a fat lump under my covers.’
    • ‘The shopkeeper had placed a small lump of coal in the centre of each to avert the evil eye.’
    • ‘On one occasion, a lump of a stone was hurdled through her bedroom window and landed on the floor after passing over her while she slept inside.’
    • ‘Michael will talk about the book and use a lump of stone and a piece of gold to illustrate themes of alchemy.’
    • ‘After everyone had eaten, she handed them each a lump of the sticky substance.’
    • ‘The performance paid a kind of homage to how long it takes to grow a lump of coal compared to a clump of rice.’
    • ‘How could a lump of bronze cease to exist merely for this reason?’
    • ‘I started with a lump of clay and pulled it up into a cylinder.’
    • ‘To make these stamps the students fashioned a small lump of clay into a shape like a small rubber stamp.’
    • ‘Police have branded two boys who threw a lump of concrete at a truck travelling on a busy Braintree road as ‘irresponsible and stupid’.’
    • ‘They became enthralled as the lumps of clay transformed into lively pots with animal characteristics.’
    • ‘Since then, a lump of concrete has been thrown at his house.’
    • ‘Then it's all nicely combined into a big lump of dough.’
    • ‘Take a small of lump of dough, and roll it into a ball.’
    • ‘Alex stared down at the lump of an unknown substance currently residing on his lunch tray.’
    • ‘The cloak's clasp was a lump of pewter in the shape of a skull, and his eyes were the coldest blue I'd ever seen.’
    • ‘Tearing a piece from a large lump of kneaded dough on the metal table, the master baker swiftly rolled it out into a long, tube-like form.’
    • ‘I turned away and slid back down the mound, only to feel a lump of something at my feet.’
    chunk, wedge, hunk, piece, mass, block, slab, cake, nugget, ball, brick, cube, dab, pat, knob, clod, gobbet, dollop, wad, clump, cluster, mound, concentration
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    1. 1.1 A swelling under the skin, especially one caused by injury or disease.
      ‘he was unhurt apart from a huge lump on his head’
      • ‘Her head started pounding, so she lifted a hand to the area where she had bumped her head and winced when she felt the forming swelling of a lump.’
      • ‘Occasionally, hard, tender lumps appear near the scars or along the line of the removed veins.’
      • ‘Adam turns about to show him the lump on the back of his head.’
      • ‘From March to September last year, he believed he had beaten the disease but the lump in his neck returned and on October 16 he was told the cancer had returned.’
      • ‘Often we are not battered to the point that we display horrendous scars, visible bruises or lumps and bumps.’
      • ‘All patients complained of swelling or lumps in the affected area with no nipple retraction or discharge.’
      • ‘After having two benign lumps removed, she had her procedures done just to play it safe.’
      • ‘Her mother also had a benign lump removed.’
      • ‘My face is swollen and I've got a huge lump on my gum that throbs.’
      • ‘If the discomfort is associated with other symptoms, such as a lump or skin changes, see a doctor as soon as possible.’
      • ‘In most instances, there is no need for anesthesia, especially for lumps and bumps that are felt underneath the skin.’
      • ‘She gingerly felt the huge lump on the back of her head and winced - it hurt a lot.’
      • ‘Some problems may be detected-and treated-early by examining your pet weekly for lumps, bumps and skin irritations.’
      • ‘My son was in great pain, had developed a huge lump in his groin area and after a series of frantic telephone calls the only option was the Hospital.’
      • ‘If you find anything unusual during a self-exam (like a lump or swelling), see your doctor right away.’
      • ‘She went through surgery to remove a cancerous lump on her right breast and 17 surrounding lymph nodes.’
      • ‘I know of people who suffered the lumps and bumps of skin cancers and the inevitable dire consequences.’
      • ‘There was a gash in his left calf where a rock or something and cut through his pants and into his leg and a huge lump on the back of his head.’
      • ‘If you notice a lump or swelling anywhere on your body, have it checked by your doctor.’
      • ‘Ask your doctor to check you over if you find an unexplained, tender lump on your head.’
      swelling, bump, bulge, protuberance, protrusion, growth, outgrowth, carbuncle, hump, tumour, wen, boil, blister, wart, corn, eruption, node, contusion
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    2. 1.2 A small cube of sugar.
      • ‘Feeding him a few lumps of sugar, she was finally able to coax him into allowing her to put on his saddle.’
      • ‘Reaching into his pocket, he pulled out two small lumps of sugar and gave one to each horse.’
      • ‘This is a nasty piece of thin elastic upon which hollow compressed lumps of sugar and colourings are threaded.’
      • ‘That protocol almost gives prisoners two lumps of sugar in every cup of tea they want.’
      • ‘In contrast, having them sing is like using two lumps of sugar when one will do.’
      • ‘He put artificial sweetener in his tea instead of his normal three lumps of sugar.’
      • ‘There's a trail bar and a cup of tea for everyone, one lump of sugar in each cup.’
      • ‘Within seconds of meeting him, this sense of mystique has dissolved, along with the lumps of brown sugar being heaped into our coffee cups.’
      • ‘Substitute old-fashioned lumps of sugar or ordinary lumps of sugar, crushed.’
      • ‘The rocks reminded him of the lumps of sugar he used to stir into his tea - so they became the Sugar Loaf Islands.’
      • ‘I drop two lumps of brown sugar into my cup and pour the coffee and milk in together.’
      • ‘Hope frowned, her attention focused on stirring two lumps of sugar into her breakfast tea.’
      • ‘Paritutu was first discovered by Pakeha in 1770 when Captain Cook sailed down the coast and named the islands after the lumps of sugar he put in his tea.’
      • ‘She poured herself a cup of tea, adding three lumps of sugar since she loved sweets, and sipped it noisily.’
    3. 1.3informal A heavy, ungainly, or slow-witted person.
      ‘I wouldn't stand a chance against a big lump like you’
      • ‘Buy yourself a new suit, get a haircut and for goodness' sake smile, you great lump.’
      • ‘He may look pretty - at least by comparison with me - but he's a big lump, and puts it about.’
      • ‘He could not contemplate life without his holding midfield player, his big lump up front, his defenders who defend, his channel ball, his pressing game.’
      • ‘Sure, all of the athletes are superbly trained and conditioned, and big lumps to boot.’
      • ‘They were just wonderful, beyond wonderful for such a bunch of big hairy lumps, and it was great to see them playing a small-ish venue.’
      • ‘So long as he and his fellow big lumps fulfil their obligations, Celtic will be through to the third round.’
      • ‘Getting stared at by a young girl still fascinated by big western lumps?’

verb

  • 1with object and adverbial Put in an indiscriminate mass or group; treat as alike without regard for particulars.

    ‘Hong Kong and Bangkok tend to be lumped together in travel brochures’
    ‘he tends to be lumped in with the crowd of controversial businessmen’
    • ‘One revealing aspect of this legislation is the way in which the assembly lumped all smiths together as competent and needed to handle gun repair.’
    • ‘But asylum seekers have been so demonized in Britain that all blame has gravitated to the detainees, who have been lumped together as ungrateful arsonists.’
    • ‘Because statistics were so poorly kept in general, and Slavs were so often lumped together or confused with other groups, it is not known how many Croatians entered the United States during the Great Migration.’
    • ‘The people that this most damages are women with a genuine grievances whose cases have not been properly aired or investigated because they are lumped in with other settlements that make better media copy.’
    • ‘And I just didn't like them lumping us all together, because we are all different.’
    • ‘It seems to me that fantastically imaginative fiction tends to be lumped in with the whole science fiction genre.’
    • ‘Although often lumped together, the two are distinct.’
    • ‘In it, he lumps together the several philosophies that have fallen under that label.’
    • ‘I think that he should name names if there is foundation in what he says, because I frankly resent being lumped in with everyone else.’
    • ‘Defense contractors, for instance, might object to being lumped in with gaming companies or brewers.’
    • ‘Inevitably, those things I buy that are new to the wider world will get lumped together in my mind with those that are simply new to me, sometimes to the detriment of new stuff.’
    • ‘Everyone is lumped together by body mass index, a measure of obesity, instead.’
    • ‘For lack of a better word for it I lump all the small things that go into the formation of a proper co-operative attitude to others in government under this heading.’
    • ‘Hence, I don't know whether this latest release deserves to be lumped in with those earlier works.’
    • ‘Why do politicians always insist on lumping all drugs together?’
    • ‘It was lumped in with other illicit drugs in the USA in the 1930s and we followed suit.’
    • ‘The Black Heart Procession are one of those bands that get lumped under the lazy catch-all ‘Americana’.’
    • ‘The very thought that I will be lumped in with lovers of such horrid dreck makes me physically ill.’
    • ‘Before they've heard us sing, they've lumped us in with a load of other people and they don't realise that we are the genuine article.’
    • ‘Those who argue this way are lumping together two very different things - threats and violence, on the one hand, and criticisms of judges on the other.’
    combine, put, group, bunch, aggregate, unite, pool, mix, blend, merge, mass, join, fuse, conglomerate, coalesce, consolidate, collect, throw, consider together
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    1. 1.1no object (in taxonomy) classify plants or animals in relatively inclusive groups, disregarding minor variations.
      • ‘Genetic information can be used to classify and lump, split and separate, identify and admit.’
  • 2lump alongno object Proceed heavily or awkwardly.

    ‘I came lumping along behind him’
    • ‘Instead, they spend fifteen hours of your time lumping around, unfunnily trying to rip off 30 grand.’
    • ‘If we can see fanaticists as being our friends because they are not very different from ourselves, then we might let them just lump along.’
    • ‘It's a car that can lump along in traffic with the occupants giving the hoi polloi the royal wave, or a car that can be pushed and driven enthusiastically.’
    • ‘It's lavish historical drama (though light on facts), but never achieves the greatness it could, lumping along predictably, like the Redcoats.’
    • ‘They have lots of teeth and just kind of lump along minding their own business.’

Phrases

  • a lump in the throat

    • A feeling of tightness or dryness in the throat caused by strong emotion, especially sadness.

      ‘there was a lump in her throat as she gazed down at her uncle's gaunt features’
      • ‘There are others, potential nominees whom the president might have chosen, who probably also feel a lump in the throat when they think about the Supreme Court, but it is caused by anger rather than reverence.’
      • ‘It's a film that would have caused a lump in the throat, had the director just built a plot around a man whose biological and mental age are inversely proportional - he is an adult with the mind of a seven-year-old.’
      • ‘Tears flowed freely and as their schoolmates roared No Surrender and You'll Never Walk Alone to the skies, even the neutral observer could feel the presence of a lump in the throat.’
      • ‘When we sing the national anthem, half of the squad has a lump in the throat.’
      • ‘And every time I say, it causes a lump in the throat, that he resigned as a co-conspirator in a widespread criminal conspiracy.’
      • ‘My voice trembled as I addressed the class for the very last time. I felt a lump in the throat, but I managed to gulp it down.’
      • ‘Like the TV shows, audiences are never sure if they are going to have a laugh or a lump in the throat from one moment to the next.’
      • ‘Tonight it may be his last speech to the nation as Prime Minister, and there will be a lump in the throat.’
      • ‘The film is nice in parts, but they don't add up to either leave a lump in the throat or cause an abiding smile on your face.’
      • ‘Indeed, eight of the 10 top love stories listed leave you with a lump in the throat.’
  • take (or get) one's lumps

    • informal Suffer punishment; be attacked or defeated.

      • ‘I wish the guy would take his lumps for writing a controversial book, move on, and write something else.’
      • ‘After several explosive years when their market research and analysis services could barely keep up with demand, and their conferences regularly sold out months in advance, analyst firms are taking their lumps along with their clients.’
      • ‘‘I took my lumps, got a job, and went on with life,’ says Stan.’
      • ‘Chiropractors have been taking their lumps lately.’
      • ‘We must eliminate our national debt by either making our currency less in value, taking our lumps and paying it off, or do the equivalent of going bankrupt as a country.’
      • ‘It's time for the behemoths of the airline industry to take their lumps.’
      • ‘It's a tale of two grown-ups who loved, lost, took their lumps, still loved, and hope to live happily ever after, despite everything…’
      • ‘So as the kids snickered and sarcastically posed for pictures, Dad silently took his lumps.’
      • ‘Good people did not do that in 1971; we took our lumps.’
      • ‘But these problems are mounting and Republicans may have to take their lumps in the midterm elections instead.’

Origin

Middle English: perhaps from a Germanic base meaning ‘shapeless piece’; compare with Danish lump ‘lump’, Norwegian and Swedish dialect lump ‘block, log’, and Dutch lomp ‘rag’.

Pronunciation

lump

/ləmp//ləmp/

Main definitions of lump in English

: lump1lump2

lump2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]lump it
informal
  • Accept or tolerate a disagreeable situation whether one likes it or not.

    ‘you can like it or lump it but I've got to work’
    • ‘Now, like it or lump it, sex abuse and other horrible things are part of today's society.’
    • ‘If the employer doesn't like it, he can either lump it, find a fool for an employee, or pay more.’
    • ‘But she's gonna do things her way, and the rest of us'll just have to lump it.’
    • ‘The argument of the book seems to run thus: Globalisation, like it or lump it, is an unstoppable force.’
    • ‘So like it or lump it, it is Labour for another term.’
    • ‘But now they have got all the equipment installed, I think we are going to have to like it or lump it.’
    • ‘We also need to reintroduce the spirit of competition because, like it or lump it, Scotland has to compete in the global world.’
    • ‘It seems that we are all told to like it or lump it, yet there is no legislation to help set fairly precise demarcation lines.’
    • ‘There is just this assumption that we are a capitalist society and that's it, like it or lump it.’
    • ‘Sometimes one longs for the days gone by, when film makers made just one good product and had sufficient confidence in their ability to leave it to the intelligence of audiences of all ages to like it or lump it.’
    • ‘Local people must learn to live with it or lump it.’
    • ‘‘The bulk of people are very unhappy about this, but they feel they have been told to like it or lump it,’ he said.’
    • ‘Ordinarily, they'd just have to lump it, right?’
    • ‘She has to lump it - or ‘reimagine’ a new way to clean a urinal.’
    • ‘From that moment on, the world acquiesced in capitalism: like it or lump it, there was no other alternative in town.’
    • ‘We're going to do it this way, and you can like it or lump it.’
    • ‘Family comes before football and, like it or lump it, family comes first and it seems the move has to be made.’
    • ‘Like it or lump it; if you live in a neighbourhood, that makes you a neighbour.’
    • ‘And even if you don't buy this vision of the world, you just have to lump it and swallow it.’
    • ‘Democracy didn't once enter the equation and the seven counties who had meticulously crafted suitable wordings so that the issue could be debated were effectively told to like it or lump it.’
    put up with it, bear it, endure it, take it, tolerate it, suffer it, accept it, make allowances for it, abide it, brook it, weather it, countenance it
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (in the sense ‘look sulky’): symbolic of displeasure; compare with words such as dump and grump. The current sense dates from the early 19th century.

Pronunciation

lump

/ləmp//ləmp/