Definition of lower middle class in US English:

lower middle class

noun

  • treated as singular or plural The social group between the working class and the middle class.

    ‘a rising member of the lower middle class’
    • ‘The marginal lower middle classes are not only shopkeepers.’
    • ‘As the old lower middle class struggled for survival, so a new lower middle class blossomed.’
    • ‘The newspaper, founded in 1896, with its highly efficient national distribution, soon had the provincial press on the run, and was the archetypal reading matter for the lower middle class.’
    • ‘The lower middle class is a demographic group burdened by stigma.’
    • ‘Many banks have also begun to extend their services to the lower middle class, partly under pressure from regulators, but also out of a strategic business goal.’
    • ‘The long work hours, low pay, and family burdens of the lower middle class create a different kind of consumer.’
    • ‘It differed from other provincial novels of the 1950s in that its hero is a working man, not a rising member of the lower middle class.’
    • ‘The lower middle class was probably the strongest and most unified source of support for the war, which helped make the struggle over middle-class opinion all the more urgent.’
    • ‘They achieved this by linking an essentially hierarchic, aristocratic, and Anglican party with the aspirations of the expanding middle and lower middle classes in the great cities.’
    • ‘The lower middle class now accounts for one-sixth of the US population, amounting to a market worth as much as $120 billion per year.’
    • ‘Traditionally, such service jobs were the recourse of unskilled and untrained American laborers and formed an income foundation for the lower middle class.’
    • ‘A large, intermediate group, which may be called the lower middle class, was called into being by economic change.’
    • ‘Though most remained members of the working class, large numbers moved into the ranks of the lower middle classes.’
    • ‘He can only envisage disruption occurring from the lower middle classes, embodied, in the novel, in the figure of Leonard Bast.’

adjective

  • Relating to or characteristic of the lower middle class.

    ‘a lower-middle-class background’
    • ‘There were a lot of students whose fathers were ambassadors, neurosurgeons, and Texas oil men, and for a girl coming from a lower middle class neighborhood, it was off-putting at times.’
    • ‘Hancock played a depressive, introverted, failed lower middle class person aspiring to be an intellectual.’
    • ‘The first part of the film is obviously targeting Adrian's lower middle class lifestyle—he writes to his impending bride that he works in "security and building management", which means he's a doorman.’
    • ‘I - with my meager, lower-middle class income - have given more to charity than he ever has.’
    • ‘They live in a modest apartment in a lower middle class suburb of New York.’
    • ‘He considers himself lower-middle class.’
    • ‘I'm a lower middle class lad with nothing cultural or whatever in my background.’
    • ‘She is seventeen, a high school student from a lower middle class family who is training to become a car mechanic.’
    • ‘We live in a sleepy, lower-middle class neighborhood.’
    • ‘He is a graduate from another college which is overcrowded by students mostly from the lower middle class families who generally earn the costs of their studies by giving tuition to the children of the rich.’
    • ‘It is not difficult to appreciate why many working class and lower middle class fathers were anxious about cost: the son of an accounts clerk who graduated from King's in the early 1930s pointed out that tuition fees alone absorbed a third of his father's annual income.’