Main definitions of loom in English

: loom1loom2

loom1

noun

  • An apparatus for making fabric by weaving yarn or thread.

    • ‘During the 19th century a number of machines such as looms and lathes became increasingly self-regulating.’
    • ‘We know that they hunted animals with bows and arrows and that they wove textiles using looms.’
    • ‘If this works, wiring will be woven into the fabric on the company's looms and then sensors will be attached after the garments are completed.’
    • ‘A few mills had looms on the property, but most weavers wove at home.’
    • ‘Both men and women weave, using different types of looms.’
    • ‘I pulled up everything I could find on the laptop pertaining to weaving, textiles, looms and spinning.’
    • ‘Women prepared and preserved food, made medicines, and used spinning wheels, looms, and needles to turn wool and flax into clothing.’
    • ‘They supply traditional spinning wheels and looms, the cafe is set in the historic Mill House, hand crafted products are sold in the shop and the food in the cafe is all handmade.’
    • ‘Soft and light, the sari is woven on specially designed looms.’
    • ‘I told him a bit about the fabric: how it was derived from cotton spun on mechanical looms, but I didn't explain the details of the process.’
    • ‘Downstairs were the looms and the spinning wheels, the floor covered in scraps of cloth and piles of wool.’
    • ‘Weaving is a traditional art, the cloth being woven on narrow looms.’
    • ‘Their elaborate fabrics, woven on looms from cotton and alpaca wool, are known today because they were used in a type of mummification process.’
    • ‘They set up their looms and spinning wheels in a back-to-the-future type stunt to raise awareness of their crafts.’
    • ‘Two of the most prestigious silk cloths are also woven on looms fitted with a flying shuttle.’
    • ‘The hill tribes of Cambodia weave their traditional colorful clothing on homemade looms.’
    • ‘By the eve of the Revolution, eighty to ninety percent of rural households owned spinning wheels, and almost half owned looms.’
    • ‘Entire families worked together, weaving their magic on spinning wheels and looms.’
    • ‘Similarly, Indian women are the only ones who weave on backstrap or stick looms, while both Indian and Ladino men weave on foot looms.’
    • ‘Textiles were traditionally produced on large looms in a time-consuming process but this is rare today.’

Origin

Old English gelōma tool shortened to lome in Middle English.

Pronunciation:

loom

/lo͞om/

Main definitions of loom in English

: loom1loom2

loom2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Appear as a shadowy form, especially one that is large or threatening.

    ‘vehicles loomed out of the darkness’
    • ‘A mountain loomed up ahead and Wiley knew she couldn't steer the plane around it.’
    • ‘After a few hours of driving an extremely large mountain started looming into view.’
    • ‘As we swam to the first buoy, we noticed strange shapes looming up at us from beneath the surface.’
    • ‘They saw the flashes of lightning within the dark cloud looming ahead of them.’
    • ‘Clouds loomed ominously over the beach on Saturday, but the rain stayed away.’
    • ‘Mountains loom in the distance and Bilbo thinks they must be near their destination.’
    • ‘The manor house loomed large in the distance, a shadow in the sky to block the stars.’
    • ‘A mountain loomed up in the distance as she began to slow down once more.’
    • ‘Before I lost consciousness, I saw a dark figure looming in the distance.’
    • ‘They stood outside the door and looked at the great dark castle looming ominously before them.’
    • ‘There was always some haunting sadness about her, like a shadow looming darkly behind her.’
    • ‘By nightfall the tall dark handsome pines loomed ominously overhead.’
    • ‘We followed in that direction and suddenly the great white clock loomed large, lit up and glowing against the darkness.’
    • ‘The air was cold, and damp with the promise of rain, as clouds still loomed dangerously overhead.’
    • ‘There was a silhouette emerging out of the mist, looming like an ocean liner.’
    • ‘Before I could reply though, a figure loomed up in front of us.’
    • ‘Against the dull, grey sky, a selection of dark shapes loomed before Blaze.’
    • ‘A dark shape loomed before him and he fell backwards, giving a yelp of dismay at his outline.’
    • ‘A man's shadow loomed out of the darkness in front of her; he held a stubby candle.’
    • ‘I saw the large ski lodge looming out of the darkness before me.’
    emerge, appear, become visible, come into view, take shape, materialize, reveal itself, appear indistinctly, come to light, take on a threatening shape
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of an event regarded as ominous or threatening) seem about to happen.
      ‘there is a crisis looming’
      ‘higher mortgage rates loomed large last night’
      • ‘When ticket sales are poor and disaster looms he promises something a little extra.’
      • ‘But she didn't return to art as an adult until a crisis loomed.’
      • ‘Fail to budget properly, managers are warned, and insolvency looms around the corner.’
      • ‘In the meantime however, an unholy war looms close at hand.’
      • ‘A bigger threat may loom on the media landscape.’
      • ‘The deadlines loomed closer, and I did nothing to prepare for them.’
      • ‘"There is a housing crisis looming and we're just about in it.’
      • ‘My sense is that the probability of such an event looms nearer and grows larger with each passing day.’
      • ‘But with a general election looming on the horizon, the ruling group will not risk division in its ranks.’
      • ‘Another giant threat looms for public sector workers.’
      • ‘The Bureau of Meteorology warned authorities on January 15 that a disaster was looming.’
      • ‘However he does acknowledge that global warming is looming as a significant threat to the reef.’
      • ‘Once well-deserved celebrations waned, the daunting task of finding a space loomed large.’
      • ‘Despite police alerting people on the new rule, uncertainty loomed large on city roads till afternoon.’
      • ‘With the elections looming large, his government is fighting to keep energy prices under control.’
      • ‘Indeed, even if trouble appears to be looming, the share price may have already factored it in.’
      • ‘However, those same predictions can whip us into frenzy if the fateful deadline looms ahead.’
      • ‘He saw a great crisis looming and announced judgement and the opportunity to repent.’
      • ‘"Oh no, we have to be going, " Nicholas said, the threat looming in his mind.’
      • ‘Exams were looming at the end of the academic year, which Chig knew he was bound to fail.’
      be imminent, be on the horizon, impend, be impending, be close, be ominously close, threaten, be threatening, menace, brew, be just around the corner
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1[in singular] A vague and often exaggerated first appearance of an object seen in darkness or fog, especially at sea.

    ‘the loom of the land ahead’
    • ‘From the Monday to the Thursday I doubt whether it was ever possible from our windows in Baker Street to see the loom of the opposite houses.’
    • ‘His memoirs state that he was "conscious of the loom of the land about 3 am", little more than an hour before the landing.’
    1. 1.1 The dim reflection by cloud or haze of a light that is not directly visible, e.g., from a lighthouse over the horizon.
      • ‘In the distance, straight ahead off the bow, I could see the loom of the green five-second light of the Block Island lighthouse.’
      • ‘You may observe the glow or loom of the lighthouse before you see the light of the lighthouse's lantern.’
      • ‘The loom of the lighthouse flashed across the sky. The waves moved back and forth across the jagged rocks, gradually becoming larger and more menacing.’
      • ‘Rock, nothing but ocean waves for another 170 miles until the loom of the Fastnet light lifts above the horizon.’
      • ‘Thousands pay homage every year and the loom of its light is a sight for seafarers' eyes.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: probably from Low German or Dutch; compare with East Frisian lōmen move slowly Middle High German lüemen be weary.

Pronunciation:

loom

/lo͞om/