Definition of longueur in English:

longueur

noun

  • A tedious passage in a book or other work.

    ‘its brilliant comedy passages do not cancel out the occasional longueurs’
    ‘the last act is sometimes marred by longueur’
    • ‘In the right production the longueurs don't seem to matter much - this score becomes more spellbinding each time I hear it.’
    • ‘None of the symphonic music of Rimsky-Korsakov, Rachmaninov, Delius, Richard Strauss or Skryabin is without longueurs.’
    • ‘The script, however, by David King, was no match for its actor, thick with longueurs and sitcom character development.’
    • ‘The work has its longueurs, but it is worth waiting around for this inexpressibly limpid and lovely solo.’
    • ‘Since then, the work has been performed in Chicago, where the composer made a few nips and tucks that were supposed to solve problems of pacing and the occasional longueur.’
    • ‘That's how opera fans go about their business, collecting wayside works for the inevitable Wagnerian longueurs.’
    • ‘It's to be expected, of course, that in a film of this length and ambition there will be missteps and longueurs.’
    • ‘Scenes swiftly follow each other in the three acts which last a total of only an hour and 45 minutes, and there are no unwelcome longueurs.’
    • ‘Even if there are occasional longueurs, the show's visual wit and intelligence remain impressive.’
    • ‘This second half suffered from longueur, and finally ended with Bach's death.’
    • ‘The present performers shape the concerto's architecture well, and what seem like longueurs elsewhere don't seem tiresome at all here.’
    • ‘Instead, it's got four good dances, a few good laughs, and not a few longueurs.’
    • ‘Its war scenes aside, A Very Long Engagement has only the longueurs of Audrey Tautou in the part of Mathilde.’
    • ‘Stillborn epigrams, mechanistic wordplay, and numbing longueurs feel like hapless actors' improvisations.’
    • ‘Despite a few longueurs, this latest episode has a thousand times more energy, more fun, more visual invention, more deliciously arch comic intelligence than anything comparable in the summer movie marketplace.’
    • ‘So good is it, that the longueurs of sitting through the first play evaporate within the first minute of sitting through the second, and you can't get better than that.’
    • ‘It is certainly a film with its longueurs, and is often frustratingly opaque.’

Origin

French, literally length.

Pronunciation:

longueur

/lôNGˈɡər/