Definition of longspur in English:

longspur

Pronunciation: /ˈläNG-//ˈlôNGˌspər/

noun

  • A mainly Canadian songbird related to the buntings, with brownish plumage and a boldly marked head in the male.

    • ‘Long-billed curlews, burrowing owls, chestnut-collared and McCowan's longspurs summer in the park.’
    • ‘Nests were checked every one to three days for evidence of rejection until an experimental egg was rejected or the longspur's eggs hatched.’
    • ‘The record for numbers of notes in a stereotyped pattern might well go to some species of lark or longspur, or some other open-country bird whose songs often include scores of different notes.’
    • ‘Some common shorebirds and seabirds in the Southern Arctic are the semi-palmated plover, northern phalarope, lapland longspur, parasitic jaeger, and semi-palmated plover.’
    • ‘A similar ‘group hysteria,’ he adds, gripped hundreds of birders in California, who for days mistakenly took a skylark for a Smith's longspur.’
    • ‘Burrowing arid short-eared owls, Baird's and LeConte's sparrows, chestnut-collared longspurs, and Sprague's pipits are often spotted as well as the western meadowlark, the Montana state bird.’
    • ‘To address that, we experimentally parasitized longspur nests with real and wooden cowbird eggs to determine whether longspurs eject cowbird eggs.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, the ejection of nonmimetic eggs by longspurs suggests they are physically capable of removing cowbird eggs, yet they accepted all cowbird eggs added to their nests.’
    • ‘Unlike most birds with different breeding and non-breeding plumages, longspurs molt only once a year.’
    • ‘I noticed a burned field, and I hoped for longspurs.’

Pronunciation:

longspur

/ˈläNG-//ˈlôNGˌspər/