Definition of logical in English:

logical

adjective

  • 1Of or according to the rules of logic or formal argument.

    ‘a logical impossibility’
    • ‘If only rule-governed real numbers are considered, then discontinuous functions cannot be ruled out on logical grounds.’
    • ‘Which of the following is the most logical conclusion based on the above?’
    • ‘Allow yourself to feel the concepts in it without continually analysing the argument for consistency and logical structure.’
    • ‘Some have even taken these arguments to their logical conclusions and have called for the end of the capital gains tax.’
    • ‘Diagnoses were generated according to specified and logical rules.’
    • ‘They are all constructed according to a common logical plan.’
    • ‘After this discovery, mathematicians increasingly regarded their results as logical consequences of axioms, rather than as absolute truths.’
    • ‘Why not subject them to the same questions that get directed against logical rules?’
    • ‘A soft sigh escaped his lips as he came to the most logical conclusion.’
    • ‘Taken to its logical conclusion, the argument by the Petitioners would lead to absurdity.’
    • ‘Taking these conditions into consideration provided a more logical explanation for this anomaly.’
    • ‘Lamont follows this argument through to its logical conclusion.’
    • ‘Aristotle had also dealt with this type of logical argument.’
    • ‘However, I think it is quite normal to hold two views that, if taken to their logical conclusions, really are contradictory.’
    • ‘What scientists frown upon is levelling arguments based on rank ignorance and logical fallacies.’
    • ‘An argument is logically valid if and only if its conclusion is a logical consequence of its premises.’
    • ‘There's a logical argument behind that, but the logic is secondary to me.’
    • ‘Surely, they do not mean to do that, because such an argument is a logical fallacy.’
    • ‘Mathematicians, or scientists doing mathematics, then investigate the purely logical consequences of the theory.’
    • ‘My partner read it and told me I was bottling the serious logical argument.’
    reasoning, thinking, straight-thinking, rational, objective, analytical, cerebral, insightful
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    1. 1.1 Characterized by or capable of clear, sound reasoning.
      ‘her logical mind’
      ‘the information is displayed in a simple and logical fashion’
      • ‘In this case, it would be logical to move to the left space.’
      • ‘He managed to make the digital strategy sound not just logical but absolutely necessary.’
      • ‘This is one of the reasons it became so logical for English to become the lingua franca of this multi-lingual nation.’
      • ‘The content is laid out on the page in an incredibly clear and logical fashion.’
      • ‘Why did it sound so logical in my apartment but so ridiculous now?’
      • ‘He had taken the car for the very sound, very logical reason that he wanted it.’
      • ‘Liberal ideas on society and the family can sound utterly convincing and logical to those who know no history, or don't see its relevance.’
      • ‘The feelings are natural, and sometimes feelings don't have to be logical.’
      • ‘That may sound logical enough but in fact those are the morals of a looter.’
      • ‘Lots of stuff sounds logical or reasonable but fails any objective test.’
      • ‘The problem, though, is that everyone has a logical reason for what they spend.’
      • ‘I shook my head, but then thought it oddly logical.’
      • ‘It sounded logical enough but it did involve getting his racquet on the ball.’
      • ‘There is no logical reason why I should not die in the next hour.’
      • ‘Calmly, the therapist questioned whether it is logical to expect others to always do things your way.’
      • ‘Although this sounds logical on the surface, there is no guaranteeing this will happen.’
      • ‘That sounded somewhat logical to me, so I no longer pursued a friendship with her.’
      • ‘Most transfers are for fairly logical reasons, as seen by the number of clubs who wish their departing members well elsewhere.’
      • ‘The only logical reason to keep the files secret is to protect the guilty.’
      reasoned, well reasoned, rational, sound, cogent, well thought out, valid
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    2. 1.2 (of an action, development, decision, etc.) natural or sensible given the circumstances.
      ‘it is a logical progression from the job before’
      • ‘With finite medical resources it seems only logical to manage those health problems as efficiently as possible.’
      • ‘Life has to be balanced and happy so when I made the conscious decision to try to keep my work and the rest of my life separate, it was the logical decision to come back up the road.’
      • ‘The subsequent breakdown seemed a quite logical consequence of history.’
      • ‘Being a conservative talk show host is a logical extension of his upbringing, notes Pendleton.’
      • ‘Increasing specialism is a logical extension in secondary care.’
      • ‘Thus it is logical to assume that there is something radically wrong with the muscle in a patient with asthma.’
      • ‘He therefore thought it logical to use the pseudonym.’
      • ‘Would that not have been more democratic, not to say far more sensible and logical?’
      • ‘With more children consuming cranberry drinks, it's only logical to expect more cranberry drink spills.’
      • ‘It would seem logical that we could expect the same results from these new technologies.’
      • ‘I guess when you're coming with this kind of force, it's kind of logical to expect a kind of deflation quotient in the media.’
      • ‘It's a good bet that there's a logical reason for your friend getting invited and not you.’
      • ‘He emphasised it was logical to expect them to hover around the end of 2006 or the beginning of 2007.’
      • ‘Celebrity campaigning is a logical extension of celebrity charity work, as Princess Diana showed when she took up landmines.’
      • ‘It is actually the logical progression from their self-titled debut.’
      • ‘In the short term, that certainly doesn't mean abandoning the Ethical Trade launch - this is a logical brand extension.’
      • ‘It's more, as I see it, a proactive way to deal with the situation, something that's sensible and logical.’
      • ‘As Jon might expect, I reckon the logical progression is indeed open to argument.’
      • ‘However it seems to me that that is a natural and logical progression of thought which could reasonably be based on the reasons advanced by the mother.’
      • ‘His benign nihilism seems only logical within a society consumed by conflicting and destructive beliefs.’
      natural, unsurprising, only to be expected, understandable, reasonable, sensible
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from medieval Latin logicalis from late Latin logica (see logic).

Pronunciation

logical

/ˈläjək(ə)l//ˈlɑdʒək(ə)l/