Main definitions of loaf in English

: loaf1loaf2

loaf1

noun

  • 1A quantity of bread that is shaped and baked in one piece and usually sliced before being eaten.

    ‘a loaf of bread’
    ‘two loaves in the oven’
    • ‘Then on Sunday I baked myself a loaf of bread - I used a mix of white and wholemeal flour to which I added a good handful of oats.’
    • ‘There is nothing as simple as baking a loaf of bread or a cake.’
    • ‘We spotted this curry chicken baked in a loaf of bread at a neighbouring table.’
    • ‘Baking a loaf of bread will change the way you think about food.’
    • ‘Thus the outside of a loaf of bread is the crust or croûte.’
    • ‘The play centres round the baking of a loaf of challah bread, made to her father's cherished recipe.’
    • ‘He picked lemon pepper tuna, peaches, and a loaf of white toast bread.’
    • ‘We suggest the Pale Ale and, if you're hungry, a loaf of bread and garlic butter.’
    • ‘Sooner rather than later, you really must bake a loaf of bread.’
    • ‘I had ended up with two large bottles of water, four Granny Smiths, a loaf of granary bread and a jar of lemon curd.’
    • ‘I made a loaf of white soda bread and a batch of cheese scones for lunch on Saturday.’
    • ‘You can't really go wrong with a loaf of wholemeal organic bread, but as much as I love the UK I find it difficult to get remarkable fresh bread.’
    • ‘Oh, and would you be a dear and bake a loaf of bread for tonight?’
    • ‘She took out a loaf of rye bread and a block of cheese wrapped in more paper.’
    • ‘Her face is like the top slice of a loaf of bread which is 7 days stale’
    • ‘You make it, I know now, from reading the cookbook, with a loaf of stale country bread soaked in cold water, basil, a couple of roasted red peppers, a red onion and two small cucumbers.’
    • ‘Poor wretch, the officers tell me that he was caught robbing a loaf of bread from the basket of a wealthy Lady who had bought it.’
    • ‘I was making a stew which would hopefully last a few days and I'd also baked a loaf of bread earlier.’
    • ‘In one scene the actors actually baked a loaf of bread and shared it with the audience.’
    • ‘As the inside expands it cracks the outer shell, giving it the appearance of the crust of a loaf of bread.’
    1. 1.1 An item of food formed into an oblong shape and sliced into portions.
      • ‘Mixing meat with eggs and bread crumbs alone is simply hamburger loaf.’
      • ‘Not content to have a nice big dish of holiday mushroom ravioli or lentil loaf, vegetarians seem curiously afflicted with a desire to conform to the season.’
      • ‘She had her share of bad '70s health food - think soy loaf - but she was also exposed to a variety of foods at an early age.’
      • ‘He would starve if I did not feed him bits of old olive loaf.’
      • ‘Garnished with fresh vegetables and a side of mashed potatoes, this loaf of pure C grade meat is the talk of the town.’

Phrases

  • half a loaf is better than none

    • proverb It is better to accept less than one wants or expects than to have nothing at all.

      • ‘Still half a loaf is better than no bread, although it is important that the managerial commitment to address this particular situation in 2003 is honoured.’
      • ‘The rules are clearly designed as an additional incentive on P to settle, and the more risk-averse he is, the more likely he is to say that half a loaf is better than no bread at all.’
      • ‘As I've said, many people will not regard the recycling operation as the most ideal one for the ultra modern advance factory, but as the old saying goes, half a loaf is better than no bread.’
      • ‘I said, ‘Well, half a loaf is better than no bread.’’
      • ‘This bill is like the old saying: half a loaf is better than no bread.’

Origin

Old English hlāf, of Germanic origin; related to German Laib.

Pronunciation

loaf

/lōf//loʊf/

Main definitions of loaf in English

: loaf1loaf2

loaf2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Idle one's time away, typically by aimless wandering or loitering.

    ‘don't let him see you loafing around with your hands in your pockets’
    • ‘The rest of the afternoon I have been loafing, feeling sorry for myself and surfing and playing games.’
    • ‘In one canvas palace, beautiful people loafed around on pouffes, while those outside had to make do with slightly damp grass.’
    • ‘During the day, you can loaf on the beach or head out for some diving in the clear waters of the Caribbean.’
    • ‘He has earned the right to loaf around a bit if he likes.’
    • ‘I actually quite admire the way teenagers loaf about.’
    • ‘Only about 20 others shared in this unique experience in the screening I attended, while outside in the mall where the cinema is located thousands were window - shopping or loafing about.’
    • ‘Wouldn't you rather have her issue arrive in your mailbox as opposed to loafing around bodegas and drugstores for hours until you build up the courage to buy it?’
    • ‘Near the toe of the glacier a party of three guys were loafing around their tent.’
    • ‘Having been brought up hearing nothing about wharfies save how they loafed around in the intervals between striking and stealing cargo, I got a rude shock when the task began.’
    • ‘From loafing on the beach to snorkeling and jet skiing, your beach needs will be satisfied.’
    • ‘And it was particularly galling to hear this lazy, self-congratulatory blather from kids loafing their way through college and grad school on their parents' dime.’
    • ‘Any team that loafs - or celebrates - the tiniest bit runs the risk of giving away points.’
    • ‘There were three leaders just loafing around the clubhouse turn.’
    • ‘I was loafing in Nice for a few days and decided to join two travelers for a day trip to Monte Carlo.’
    • ‘By the 1820s, though, the adjective also conjured nonathletic activities such as gambling, drinking, whoring, fire fighting, or simply loafing.’
    • ‘If just one player was caught loafing, the entire unit had to do it all over again.’
    • ‘When loafing in Miami South Beach, I was transfixed by the neon-coloured art deco hotels on Ocean Drive and, each day, squeezed past laughing tourists taking photographs of one particular building.’
    • ‘Mat says that time saved means more time to loaf around.’
    • ‘Offshore, seals loaf around on the Carracks, two rocky islets and the odd small fishing boat bounces across the surf.’
    • ‘Had a busy week dealing with drunk rambling boyfriends (well… not plural, there was only one) celebrating St David's day and generally loafing about.’
    • ‘Mark Twain was a frequent visitor in the early 1900s (‘the right country for a jaded man to loaf in,’ he said).’
    • ‘His critics in Washington said he's loafing, he is abandoning the office, and they took advantage of it and started to take over the functions of government because the president was gone.’
    • ‘She'd feel secure again after loafing in the guidance office for a period or two.’
    • ‘It's about standing around - not loafing but spending hour upon hour on one's feet.’
    • ‘It's fun to use Things you've made yourself, and puttering in the garage sure beats loafing in front of the television.’
    • ‘There we were, loafing in his front room on a rainy afternoon, parents out at work in the days where you could trust your kids not to burn the house down while you're out for the day.’
    • ‘Can Ed himself do nothing but play with a ball as he loafs at his desk?’
    • ‘At any rate, having done a fair bit of shopping on Friday I was able to stay out of town altogether on Saturday, and just slept late and loafed around.’
    • ‘To protect my investment while loafing in the outback, I demand the very best leather gear available.’
    • ‘The idea came about while I was loafing around on my Christmas vacation.’
    • ‘After all, writing laws is what a Legislature does, and if they don't write enough laws, it can begin to look like they've been loafing.’
    • ‘He sings and celebrates himself, he loafs and invites his soul.’
    • ‘I guess she likes her male to loaf around the yard in boxers and no shirt, guzzle a beer and let off a hearty belch etc etc.’
    • ‘For guys who drank and loafed their way through college, he's a familiar figure.’
    • ‘Saturday and Sunday were spent loafing around, watching movies (some good, some not so good) and awards ceremonies.’
    • ‘He is pragmatic about the idea of trendily shod herder kids loafing about the steppe.’
    • ‘The next morning you can loaf around at your pleasure, and in the afternoon there will be a demonstration of a back massage, followed by gentle exercise and some stimulating oils to prepare you for your journey home.’
    • ‘We'll go frogging, fishing, exploring, botanizing, and even loafing.’
    • ‘If you're looking for a travel destination with both historical locations and a chance to loaf on the beach, nothing beats Greece.’
    • ‘It is a place to escape to for days spent loafing in hammocks, meandering among the coconut palms in the garden or idling through pulp novels on the patio, all the time lulled by the pounding surf and the relentless whoosh of the trade winds.’
    laze, lounge, loll
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: probably a back-formation from loafer.

Pronunciation

loaf

/loʊf//lōf/