Definition of load in US English:

load

noun

  • 1A heavy or bulky thing that is being carried or is about to be carried.

    ‘in addition to their own food, they must carry a load of up to eighty pounds’
    • ‘She carried heavy loads, moved rocks to reclaim the land, seaweed to fertilise the barren ground and turf from the bogs.’
    • ‘Longshoreman and other workers who must carry heavy loads, or who have their back bent for a long time can easily overstrain their backs.’
    • ‘Though some of the children however are compelled to go to the kilns and help their parents make bricks and carry the heavy load on their tender heads.’
    • ‘Each fighter was carrying a heavy load, with two 110 gallon drop-tanks.’
    • ‘We drove past lines of civilians carrying heavy loads.’
    • ‘Her back aches from a long journey carrying a heavy load, but her heart aches even more, from the fear that failure will expose herself and her children to hunger, thirst and disease.’
    • ‘Larger women often are favored as brides because they appear to come from a well-to-do family that can provide a significant dowry and seem strong enough to carry heavy loads.’
    • ‘Front-pointing up endless snow slopes or carrying absurdly heavy loads can leave your calves screaming for mercy.’
    • ‘Have you ever seen such a heavy load carried with such grace?’
    • ‘Off-road construction dumpers, which are considered dangerous by road safety experts, may be allowed to carry even heavier loads on public roads.’
    • ‘This task is done by the women and children and their health is often severely impaired by carrying such heavy loads.’
    • ‘The ride and handling is on par with the class leaders, and it is very surefooted in tight road twists - even while carrying a heavy load.’
    • ‘Children forced to carry heavy loads suffer from constant backaches and fatigue.’
    • ‘It will be safer, more environmentally friendly and able to carry heavier loads, thereby allowing longer periods in the air between refuels.’
    • ‘Climate and terrain can exhaust soldiers carrying heavy loads.’
    • ‘If you require an estate car for carrying bulky loads, rather than heavy ones, the 1.4-litre petrol version is probably the one for you.’
    • ‘They are usually used to haul heavy loads or carry cargoes.’
    • ‘Others are routinely beaten or killed for trying to escape or for being unable to carry the heavy loads put on their backs.’
    • ‘Despite being only about 5ft 4in tall, the men often carry loads 15 lb heavier than a fully-loaded soldier.’
    • ‘Women skilfully carry heavy loads on their heads.’
    cargo, freight, freightage, charge, burden
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The total number or amount that can be carried in something, especially a vehicle of a specified type.
      ‘a tractor-trailer load of new appliances’
      • ‘He sells records by the lorry load - and commuters in the capital are falling over buskers on every street corner.’
      • ‘Yes you could, but we've got a shed load of business process stuff in Public Folders.’
      • ‘Full-service Asian airlines operated wide-bodied aircraft which could carry a full cargo load.’
      • ‘Some have a couple of shipping container loads dragging at their heels.’
      • ‘Note: the list has been restricted to a half container load to minimise costs.’
      • ‘Since she exports artefacts by the container load, she often negotiate contracts with local artists, a year or more in advance.’
      • ‘Approximately 120 bags and 10 trailer loads of rubbish were collected and removed by Waterford Co Council.’
      • ‘The biotechnology company has, through a number of well-timed share placements, bucket loads of money.’
      • ‘Park staff took away four tandem trailer loads of rubbish, he said.’
    2. 1.2 An amount of items washed or to be washed in a washing machine or dishwasher at one time.
      ‘I do at least six loads of washing a week’
      • ‘If not, wash a load and watch for where water leakage occurs.’
      • ‘Your clothes are in the dryer - I didn't think you'd want them washed in the same load.’
      • ‘Wearing a bra with visible straps when bra used to be white but has clearly been washed in a colours load is wrong.’
      • ‘By the time Oliver's been fed, had his nappy changed, and I've done a load or two of washing in the morning it's time to start the feeding and changing routine all over again.’
      • ‘In general, washing one large load is more efficient than washing two small loads.’
      • ‘Wash and dry full laundry loads and use your dishwasher's air dry cycle.’
      • ‘While it probably won't stain other shirts in the wash load, it will fade, and fairly quickly.’
      • ‘That's when you've doing a wash of heavier weight garments and the load in the washing machine slips all to one side during the spin cycle - becomes unbalanced, you see.’
      • ‘I don't know why I don't just do a load when I accumulate enough but I'd guess it has something to do with my natural tendency to procrastinate.’
      • ‘Never mind that it takes me two hours to hang out four loads of washing, not including folding and ironing time and I usually do about 12 to 16 loads per week.’
      • ‘Finally, when I got up to go get a book to read while the load was washing, I opened the door.’
      • ‘Wait until you have a full load before using a dishwasher or washing machine.’
      • ‘It could wash big loads, yet used a skimpy 16 gallons of water - 28 gallons less per load than a conventional washer.’
      • ‘No experienced home launderer actually washes twelve or more loads instead of four.’
      • ‘Wash only full loads in the dishwasher, or handwash dishes with a basin of soapy water and a basin of clear rinse water.’
      • ‘I got two loads of laundry done (must remember to get the second load out of the dryer when I get home).’
      • ‘To conserve water and energy, wait until you have a full load before running your dishwasher or washing machine.’
      • ‘If you are washing a small load, use the appropriate water-level setting.’
      • ‘Switching off the TV at night instead of leaving it on standby, saving the weekly wash until you've got a full load, and only boiling as much water as you need, can all save money.’
      • ‘Water saving tips include washing the car with a bucket instead of a hose, ensuring washing machines and dishwashers have a full load, and turning off the tap while brushing teeth.’
    3. 1.3 The material carried along by a stream, glacier, ocean current, etc.
      • ‘Extension of these subsidence patterns beyond 305 Ma depends on how far northwards the orogenic load advanced.’
      • ‘These may be examples of a flood event that carried everything from trees to tiny seeds downstream until water levels receded and the load was dropped and deposited.’
      • ‘Rivers carry their greatest sediment loads during the few days or weeks when stream flow and turbulence are greatest.’
      • ‘Foreland migration of the basin edge was related to foreland-directed migration of the orogenic load.’
      • ‘Tertiary sediments cause subsidence of the basin substrata 2.3 km below sea level, as a result of the sediment load.’
      • ‘Although some of the sediment load transported by the Axios River was deposited on the deltaic plain during floods, the greater proportion was discharged into the Thermaikos Gulf.’
      • ‘Grass buffer zones or vegetative filter strips have been investigated as a means of reducing nutrient loads in streams.’
      • ‘Likewise, the bulk of the sediment load was transported directly to the sea, limiting the deposition of sediment on the deltaic plain.’
      • ‘In the Ebro basin, flexure of the crust was produced mainly by the Pyrenean load, but also by the emergent thrust sheet of the Aragonese Branch.’
      • ‘Furthermore, we found that the number, amplitude and spacing of such flow folds depends on the history of the load driving the extrusion.’
      • ‘Another possible explanation for the tilting is the waxing and waning of ice sheet loads.’
      • ‘Subsidence rates in foreland basins decrease away from the orogenic load, and are generally higher than those in extensional basins.’
      • ‘Some of the sediment load was trapped within the meanders, forming extended point-bars.’
      • ‘The position of the orogenic load during the Late Carboniferous is poorly constrained.’
      • ‘Both types of channels periodically deposit their sediment load as lobes onto the axial channel belt where it is reworked.’
      • ‘A significant prediction from the forward model is the spatial evolution of the orogenic load in SW England, summarized in Fig.6.’
  • 2A weight or source of pressure borne by someone or something.

    ‘the increased load on the heart caused by a raised arterial pressure’
    ‘the arch has hollow spandrels to lighten the load on the foundations’
    • ‘When attaching furniture or cabinets to framed walls, it is important to align the screws with the stronger internal structure that can bear a load.’
    • ‘Releasing toxins via the skin through perspiration reduces the load on both the kidneys and liver.’
    • ‘You will need to rotate your wheels slightly more often as the center two wheels are likely to experience more wear than the front and rear wheels, as they will be bearing more load on average.’
    • ‘It is possible he will be asked to drop some of the weight to ease the load on his left knee, in which he tore the ACL in 1998.’
    • ‘The increased surface area of the blade puts a greater load on your leg muscles like a wet weight workout.’
    • ‘Indeed it seems so strong that you could dispense with the back stitches if the line of sewing does not have to bear a load.’
    • ‘Try to avoid exercises that increase the strength of short, strong muscles and those that put an undue load on already stretched muscles, Drake says.’
    • ‘With the panel construction method, the load is borne not by individual posts but by whole panels, which only need to be reinforced against buckling.’
    • ‘There is no rise in arterial pressure or any pressure load on the ventricle as above.’
    • ‘Then they pressurise the load on top of the pillar.’
    • ‘The sudden decrease in the water pressure during the drawdown phase reduces the load on the structure, thereby inducing a bending movement on the base of the dam.’
    • ‘They have to bear the load when the forehead lies at the ground, hence the neck muscles become stronger.’
    • ‘This apparatus allows you to place a load on the body without the instability associated with free weights.’
    • ‘A bungee retracts, while a knot on a cord through the hole limits the amount the button can be pulled out (and this bears the load when the wing is being pulled down).’
    • ‘If the designer wanted to create a wall that saw a sharing of loads, that is both the bricks and the blocks bearing the loads, then in his view he would have specified special ties.’
    • ‘According to the manufacturer, the device helps to prevent repetitive strain injuries by varying work positions and reducing the load on wrists.’
    • ‘A hollow cylindrical column bearing a compressive load can fail by local buckling (kinking like a soda can).’
    • ‘One should avoid being overweight, because excess weight increases the load on the joints.’
    • ‘They support compressive loads arising from body weight and muscle tension and anchor one vertebral body to the next.’
    • ‘Joints move and bear a load: your weight, in other words.’
    force, physical force, stress, thrust
    strain, stress, tension, heat, burden, weight, drain, trouble, care, adversity, difficulty
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 The amount of work to be done by a person or machine.
      ‘Arthur has a light teaching load’
      • ‘They take full course loads, work part-time, contribute to the campus community, and still have time for a life outside of it all!’
      • ‘It will create a light load on the CPU while serving the most requests possible.’
      • ‘But most lament that they are unable due to work loads and pressures from bosses.’
      • ‘This has resulted in increased teaching loads, and less courses being offered.’
      • ‘Harmon negotiated a university contract for two thirds time, which reduced his teaching load and allows him to get a lot of work done during the summer.’
      • ‘This is a mammoth task by any criteria, and the more hands there are the lighter the work load for each individual.’
      • ‘For many professional hosting services, sub domains are hosted on different machines to reduce the load on individual servers.’
      • ‘She indicated that the government strategy had been to agree to the raise in exchange for not filling open vacancies and increasing the work load on the remaining workers.’
      • ‘My teaching load is spread across four departments at two universities at the moment.’
      • ‘When a college student plans his first three years right, his senior year can be spent taking light course loads - and lighter courses.’
      • ‘Teachers had sought the change because increased workloads, teaching demands and administration loads have made the job intolerable.’
      • ‘But looking at the potential load on the server, here are some numbers with that.’
      • ‘Hope your homework load has gotten lighter… and hope you do get to sleep!’
      • ‘During this time, teaching loads at many American institutions were high, usually four courses per term.’
      • ‘One officer may sleep if the work load is light, while the other monitors the flight.’
      • ‘For example, it would lessen the load on the teachers from the supervision standpoint by cutting down a break and thereby cutting down the school day.’
      • ‘His teaching load amounted to little at first, so he had plenty of opportunity to develop further programs outside the university.’
      • ‘To control the load on each machine, a script is run which increases the nice level of each process the longer it executes.’
      • ‘He appealed for more members to help out on various committees and so lesson the load on directors and staff, if only a few hours per month.’
      • ‘In the absence of any fresh recruitment in the banks and a substantial increase in the volume of business, the work load on the employees and the officers had also increased.’
    2. 2.2 A burden of responsibility, worry, or grief.
      ‘consumers will find it difficult to service their heavy load of debt’
      • ‘Alicia's fervent hope was that her love and support would make his painful load easier to bear.’
      • ‘Being the caretaker of the blues is a heavy load to carry and admittedly Guy can't do it on his own.’
      • ‘The debt was a heavy load on the part of the Government whose leaders were spending sleepless nights thinking about ways and means of overcoming the problem.’
      • ‘At the same time the other officers said they would share the load and take a lot of the responsibility off Jerry's shoulders.’
      • ‘You carry a heavy load, and this has weighed you down with all the horrors that humanity has to offer.’
      • ‘In other words, we should all individually carry what is our everyday load or responsibility, but where it becomes too heavy for us, we all join in and share the burden.’
      • ‘It concludes that since military service is a burden, moral considerations require that the load be shared as equally as possible.’
      • ‘Academia remains too strong a lure but with over three years left on her study roll, will twin aspirations prove too burdensome a load?’
      commitment, responsibility, duty, obligation, onus, charge, weight
      View synonyms
  • 3a load/loadsinformal A lot of (often used to express one's disapproval or dislike of something)

    ‘she was talking a load of garbage’
    • ‘I do not support any of these commissions - I think they are a whole load of rubbish.’
    multitude, myriad, lot, large number, great quantity, score, abundance, wealth, flood, profusion, array
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    1. 3.1a load/loads Plenty.
      ‘she spends loads of money on clothes’
      ‘there's loads to see here, even when it rains’
      • ‘We have schools programmes, online services and loads more.’
      • ‘I've been really efficient this weekend and cleared loads of things off my to do list as well.’
      • ‘There is a petition going around to get the back gate opened and loads of people have already signed.’
      • ‘Having these premises is really important for them because they'll be able to provide loads more services and be more of a resource for people.’
      • ‘When I took her back to school there were loads of children with their hair painted red or green.’
      • ‘And no there wasn't just one ticket counter there were loads.’
      • ‘We had cable when we lived in Bradford and it gave us loads of TV access with superb quality.’
      • ‘I took loads of photos and was way too slow off the mark with all of them, so here's a link to a decent picture.’
      • ‘So, I made loads of notes of my grievances to take into my appraisal meeting this morning.’
      • ‘This bush has got loads of flowers and even more buds ready to flower, we've no idea what it is yet but we love it.’
      • ‘It's too easy to spend loads of cash, but also very enjoyable and extremely addictive.’
      • ‘My friend likes running, which is great as it's free and we have loads of great parks and roads to run on.’
      • ‘We were punished last year but we still have young hurlers with loads of skill.’
      • ‘We marvelled at the centre, which has clearly had loads of money pumped into it.’
      • ‘At the moment the site has loads of vacancies but not a lot else to speak of.’
      • ‘She was the best daughter anyone could have - she was a lovely kid with loads of friends.’
      • ‘I imagine when I go into college tomorrow, loads of people will be quoting it like mad.’
      • ‘There's loads to go through, it just takes so long to do!’
      • ‘We've got loads of ideas for things we want to do, but would welcome other good suggestions.’
      • ‘There are loads of alcohol-related help groups and a quick call to one of them would do no harm at all.’
      a lot, a great deal, a great amount, a large amount, a large quantity, a number, an abundance, a wealth, a profusion, a mountain
      View synonyms
  • 4The amount of power supplied by a source; the resistance of moving parts to be overcome by a motor.

    • ‘Yonah has a new instruction to allow the host OS to shut down each core separately, to reduce power consumption when the load is low.’
    • ‘In fact, the system should be designed to permit individual modules to be taken off line for maintenance without removing the load from conditioned power.’
    • ‘A high sulfur content of the fuel and high engine speeds (rated power) and loads are associated with an increase in mutagenicity of diesel exhaust particles.’
    • ‘We employ a special platform to test loads on power supplies.’
    • ‘Equipment was tested at maximum loads to check peak power loads and cooling capabilities.’
    • ‘Changing the length of a transmission line will change the input impedance if the load isn't properly matched to the line.’
    • ‘If that actuator starts to move unexpectedly, it acts as a generator and the short provides an electrical load that slows the motor down.’
    1. 4.1 The amount of electricity supplied by a generating system at any given time.
      • ‘Con Edison needed to transfer the power load from the Leonard Street substation to Seaport without interrupting the load and causing a power outage.’
      • ‘As he reviewed his options, he heard his utility was offering financial incentives to cut electric loads when the utility's load was peaking.’
      • ‘The reliance on daylighting and the lack of air-conditioning have greatly reduced the electrical loads.’
      • ‘Facility restrooms might be a treasure trove of nonessential electric loads.’
      • ‘In general you share a transformer with several neighbors; and since you share a circuit with them, their loads will affect your electrical supply.’
      • ‘Allowing humidity to drop slightly may then cut boiler or electric loads.’
      • ‘In these facilities, when the peak is approached, the generators are started and loads transferred.’
      • ‘However, we all tend to add appliances and other electrical loads after the wiring is done.’
      • ‘Electricity supply must keep up with increased loads and sewerage with that ‘end’ of it too.’
      • ‘To estimate your electrical load, total the wattage of all the equipment you'll operate at one time.’
      • ‘Two fully independent AC and DC electrical systems are each capable of supplying all essential loads in case of failure the other system.’
      • ‘Utilities need to prepare grids to handle bigger loads and to boost power from renewable sources.’
      • ‘It should not require a minimum load, and should provide automatic crossover between voltage regulation and current regulation.’
      • ‘Customers with loads greater than 900 kilowatts can choose their electric supplier and pick a new supplier if all parties agree.’
      • ‘For example, deregulation is giving facilities the incentive to flatten electrical loads.’
      • ‘If you must use an extension cord, use a cord that's rated for the electrical load and no longer really needed.’
      • ‘In a special feature, the system prevents the simultaneous turning on or off of all glow plugs to avoid high instantaneous loads on the onboard electrical power system.’
    2. 4.2Electronics An impedance or circuit that receives or develops the output of a transistor or other device.
      • ‘Since your main supply wires have some resistance, you will still get some flicker even when these loads are on different circuits.’
      • ‘Depending on the load, the voltage output will vary.’
      • ‘When the current value detected by the current detector exceeds a predetermined value, power supply to the load is stopped using a breaker.’

verb

[with object]
  • 1Put a load or large amount of something on or in (a vehicle, ship, container, etc.)

    ‘they load up their dugout canoes’
    • ‘They ensure the right vehicles are loaded in the right order so that the ship back in Europe is downloaded as quickly and efficiently as possible.’
    • ‘After the dockers stopped their picket, the ‘Greta’ ship was loaded by crane on Sunday and left for Spain, four days behind schedule.’
    • ‘The sky looked gray and stormy as the company loaded the ship and they began to set sail.’
    • ‘He was fascinated by the constant bustle on the docks, of goods trains coming and going, the huge cranes unloading and loading the ships coming from or bound for all corners of the world.’
    • ‘It is thought the feral began its journey after finding its way on to a container ship which was loaded in Chicago.’
    • ‘The Federal Government is loading another ship in Australia to deliver feed to the 52,000 sheep stranded in the Middle East.’
    • ‘In Puerto Rico the most brutal competition is for loading the ships, and to some extent for the trader.’
    • ‘‘It was savage labour loading the lorry and it would take five to six men to load the vehicle at a rate of six to seven tonnes an hour’.’
    • ‘It features a truck being loaded up with glowing green rocks from a container featuring the nuclear hazard symbol - radioactive waste.’
    • ‘It took them four days just to fill the bowls at home and about three hours to load the van to transport them.’
    • ‘A week ago, the port had to stop loading a ship because of the dust it was creating.’
    • ‘The ship was loaded in Port Adelaide and Port Lincoln in South Australia and is now in the Iraqi port of Umm Qasar.’
    • ‘He had to be, he loaded the ships at the dock Monday through Thursday to support his mother.’
    • ‘Anya tried to keep her away from the customers as much as possible, but she was very handy for carting merchandise around and helping to load vehicles.’
    • ‘Traders can load vehicles at this time, they are ready to do it.’
    • ‘Each of the ships is loaded and deployed for 3 year stints, after which they return to their main base in the US for refurbishment.’
    • ‘Response Time is defined as the time taken from the decision to begin treatment until the winter maintenance vehicles are loaded, manned and ready to leave the compound.’
    • ‘Yes, I packed and loaded vehicles, ripped apart furniture, and drove from one end of town to the other and beyond.’
    • ‘Her father was supposed to do it, but he is too drunk, so Tess and Abraham load the wagon and begin the journey to market.’
    • ‘Eight old ships were loaded up with anything that could burn well.’
    fill, fill up, pack, stuff, cram, pile, heap, stack
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Place (a load or large quantity of something) on or in a vehicle, ship, container, etc.
      ‘stolen property from a burglary was loaded into a taxi’
      • ‘That would allow Russian crude to be loaded into some of the very large crude carriers that regularly cross the Atlantic.’
      • ‘I love chocolate and I love my mother-in-law, but this cake is so thick and rich it should be loaded into helicopters and used to smother oil well fires.’
      • ‘In addition, there is now a new differential between the wages of drivers in the huge container cranes and those operating cranes used to load and unload bulk cargo.’
      • ‘The warheads had been loaded into the cargo bay and strapped down.’
      • ‘The plot is thought to have involved the use of conventional explosives, probably to be loaded into cars and driven into crowded city centres.’
      • ‘The gathered congregation then watched as the remains were loaded into a van-type vehicle for the long journey home to Poland, which took two days.’
      • ‘Typically, port operators are able to load as many as 600 containers onto a single containership.’
      • ‘But they are not checking the cargo that is loaded into those planes.’
      • ‘Tomorrow the old timber will be loaded into the back of the car and we'll take it down to the town dump for recycling.’
      • ‘Most of our 500 pounds of food, clothing and equipment have been loaded into the plane and are ready to go.’
      • ‘They also provided maintenance support at the port of Antwerp, to help repair deadlined vehicles on the spot so they could be loaded into the ships on schedule.’
      • ‘Shipments of fruit and other goods had to be loaded into the market stalls; Lena could smell bread rising somewhere.’
      • ‘They told how they got off their KLM plane in Manchester only to be told by officials that no bags had been loaded into the hold at all.’
      • ‘Apparel items often move without being touched by human hands, from the time they are loaded into a container by a supplier to being unloaded at a specific retail store.’
      • ‘I like to check in last, on the basis that the final bags to be loaded into the hold will be the first off at the other end, and I like to be greeted by a stewardess on the plane who tuts a lot and looks at her watch.’
      • ‘We now have container security initiatives and all kinds of gizmos and ways to check what's loaded into the containers.’
      • ‘Michael immediately began to load boxes and bags of food and supplies into the van.’
      • ‘Groceries will be ready for collection within three hours of ordering and will be loaded into customers' cars on arrival at the centre.’
      • ‘The warm beer, the necessities and souvenirs laid out in the shopping area - everything had been loaded into vehicles or onto camels and brought out for the festival.’
      • ‘Each morning, the luggage, food and equipment needed for the gruelling miles ahead is loaded into a minibus.’
      pack, stow, store, stack, bundle, stuff, cram, squeeze, jam, wedge
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2no object (of a ship or vehicle) take on a load.
      ‘when we came to the quay the ship was still loading’
      • ‘The first ship to load at Victor Harbor was the Goshawk taking on a cargo of whale oil in 1838.’
      • ‘I ran down to where the buses load, just to find that my bus was late again.’
      • ‘In relation to the access from Castle Street which is two way, Mr Hearn said this led to conflict between vehicles at the Castle Street access and is often made worse by vehicles loading and unloading.’
      • ‘She sighed and slumped once more into the plastic orange chair; it was only ten minutes before the Greyhound bus started loading.’
      • ‘Anything that was seen to be unsafe, somebody stopped something for - stopped a ship from loading or discharging in order to have a look at it, examine it and modify it, or what have you.’
      • ‘However, the impact is the same and now we've just heard that the ship will not be loading for at least a week, so it's going to cost millions of dollars.’
      • ‘After an internal investigation, McDonald said the company has tightened up regulations to ensure no crew members are shifting places while the vessel is loading or unloading.’
    3. 1.3load up onno object Take, buy, or consume a large amount of.
      ‘I just went down to the store and loaded up on beer’
      • ‘Other times, she would load up on fast food while on the road.’
      • ‘Obviously, we load up on all the wrong things: favourite foods, huge portions, too many sweets, too many drinks, and too much sitting around.’
      • ‘Our aim is to spend a whole day in here loading up on the food before assaulting the drinks menu at around dusk.’
      • ‘And rather than eat stale, $10 airplane meals on our long flight home, we loaded up on delicious, fresh market food.’
      • ‘Also, tell them to hold the cheese and mayonnaise, so you don't load up on too many useless calories.’
      • ‘A nontraining day is also an ideal opportunity for you to load up on bodybuilding foods, but be vigilant with your diet.’
      • ‘This study provides yet more evidence for the disease-preventive effects of vitamin C and gives us another reason to load up on plenty of foods rich in this nutrient including citrus fruit, broccoli, tomatoes and green peppers.’
      • ‘In stressful times, pregnant women are no different than the rest of us: they load up on carbohydrates, fatty foods, sweets and snacks.’
      • ‘Now this is not an excuse to load up on high fat foods, it means you still need to watch what you are eating.’
      • ‘Take off your belt and get into the sweatpants now, because you're going to load up on seven different kinds of eats during the four-hour game, with something for everyone, guaranteed.’
  • 2Make (someone or something) carry or hold a large or excessive amount of heavy things.

    ‘Elaine was loaded down with bags full of shopping’
    • ‘He was loaded down with awards, none of which were the one he wanted most - the Sandow.’
    • ‘Pickups were loaded down with bikes and boats, washing machines, all presents for the family back in Mexico.’
    • ‘Jewel called brightly shutting the door with her hip as her arms were loaded down with bags.’
    • ‘We must have cruised through every store in the mall, and by the time we left at nearly six thirty that night, our arms were loaded down with purchases.’
    • ‘They were loaded down with all kinds of freebies, including CDs and cardboard cut-outs of ‘Software Legends’.’
    • ‘It was covered with rust everywhere and the hull was so loaded down with plankton and salt crusted that it was a wonder it didn't sink from the weight.’
    • ‘The third year teachers are loaded down with thank you flowers and gifts from the students and write in the students year books.’
    • ‘The battleships were loaded down with so much fuel, food, and ammunition that armored belts and decks were below the waterline.’
    • ‘There was however a fair amount of passengers that were obviously headed to a plane, as they were loaded down with suitcases.’
    • ‘At the end of the room, a large table is loaded down with bottles of wine.’
    • ‘After the third block I was already loaded down with books.’
    • ‘And they were loaded down with so many people that they couldn't take them all.’
    burden, weigh down, saddle
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1load someone/something with Supply someone or something with (something) in overwhelming abundance or to excess.
      ‘the King and Queen loaded Columbus with wealth and honors’
      • ‘As I read over what I have written above I worry that I have loaded her victory with a political slant which I don't think that she would want; clearly she just loves to run.’
      • ‘He loaded his pitch with feel-good, can-do optimism, insisting his message is ‘based on politics of hope, based on the politics of what is possible.’’
      • ‘The evidence is there in our teams' meek exits from Europe over the past couple of weeks that the experiment of loading our clubs with foreigners, in the hope that they will deliver success in Europe, has backfired.’
      • ‘My query was sincere, my comment was loaded with independently confirmable facts and you come back to me with… nothing.’
      • ‘We're loading our lives with so much minutia that our creative thinking suffers.’
      • ‘While ‘purists’ claimed that legitimate photography was a direct copy of physical reality, the pictorialists loaded their photographs with transcendent and cultural values.’
      • ‘Politicians, pundits, and the hordes of bloggers have been polishing the brass on their discourse, loading their sentences with hot words that though they may glow with the flame of rhetoric, they are depleted of common sense…’
      • ‘He loads the film with pitch black comedy, giving it a rich texture that most filmmakers wouldn't be able to conjure up.’
      reward, ply, regale, shower
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2usually be loaded Bias toward a particular outcome.
      ‘the odds were loaded against them before the match’
      • ‘The appraisal process is loaded in favour of the methodological commitments of the appraiser.’
      • ‘‘The system is heavily loaded in favour of the Americans,’ he insists.’
      • ‘The way we are taught Shakespeare is too often loaded towards the idea that his plays are about supposedly unchanging things, like love or ambition or treachery.’
      bias, rig, fix, set up
      View synonyms
  • 3Charge (a firearm) with ammunition.

    • ‘A ‘chamber hook’ inhibits operation of the action or the ability to load the firearm while it's in the lock.’
    • ‘Before loading your gun, open the action and make sure there's no ammunition in the chamber or magazine.’
    • ‘Available in two formats, it has the option of being loaded with a banana clip of shotgun shells or being loaded manually.’
    • ‘Then I'd go back to my room, read the files and load the handgun he'd tucked in, and prepare for my mission.’
    • ‘He put his back to the bar and proceeded to load his shotgun.’
    • ‘But soldiers must still load the cannon by hand, which affects rates of fire.’
    • ‘Allison took the emergency pack and strapped it over her shoulders, and loaded the shotgun he had handed to her.’
    • ‘The breech permits loading the howitzer from the rear.’
    • ‘Moltke planned to devastate Austria's massed columns of infantry with rapid fire; his needle rifle could be loaded and fired four times more quickly than the Austrian rifle.’
    • ‘Torpedoes are automated to a degree, but the artillery guns have to be loaded manually, and for a good reason.’
    • ‘He shows me how to load the handgun and then he fires it into the sky.’
    • ‘After that, I slung on my sniper rifle, and my assault rifle, and loaded each of them.’
    • ‘Immediately following the short speech, Rolls said a man behind them began loading his gun.’
    • ‘He began to load his gun, and handed out ammunition to the others.’
    • ‘They stopped right in the middle of the parade grounds in front of the barracks, loaded their shotguns, and began to fire.’
    • ‘Then you see little Robert on a hyper streak, tearing around the house, only to be calmed by his gran showing him how to load a revolver - one of a stash of six guns.’
    • ‘In court, it was said he loaded the Derringer ‘out of curiosity’ and intended to use it on a shooting range, but never got round to it.’
    • ‘I turned to the table and loaded a shotgun and two pistols.’
    • ‘There are currently some men assigned to tanks, for example, who cannot load main gun rounds fast enough to meet combat standards.’
    • ‘I am surprised how many women report having a lot of trouble loading their pistol magazines.’
    prime, charge, arm, fill, prepare to fire, prepare to use
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 Insert something into (a device) so that it can be operated.
      ‘load your camera before you start’
      • ‘‘Don't forget to load your camera to record the first day of kindergarten,’ Helt said.’
      • ‘When you load a camera in a warm humid atmosphere, then take it diving in cold water, there is a good chance that fog will form inside the lens or housing.’
      • ‘This allowed the police forces to become complacent - for example, how do motorists know which cameras are loaded and which are not?’
      • ‘Always load and unload your camera in a protected place, away from the hazards of water and sand.’
      • ‘To load the camera, attach any sort of film or photographic paper to the inside of the canister lid.’
      • ‘Keep your film and your batteries in a fridge if possible when you get to your destination, but allow your film to warm a bit before loading your camera.’
    2. 3.2 Insert (something) into a device so that it will operate.
      ‘load the cassette into the camcorder’
      • ‘Mia sat on her bed with her camera spread out in front of her, busy loading the new film she had purchased today.’
      • ‘And who wants to fiddle with a camera that is so small that loading the film requires a lot of patience and pretty small fingers?’
      • ‘While he loads new film into the camera, I drape the sheet in a wide, loose sash over my shoulder and between my legs.’
      • ‘Start by loading the film into the tubes or drum.’
      • ‘Perhaps this is, in part, a lesson learned from forgetting to load film into my camera as a junior.’
      • ‘For this experiment, she had supplied me with very fast film, ASA 4,000, which was loaded into my Hasselblad camera.’
      • ‘As with all digital cameras, the A303's main advantages are the fact that you don't have to load film and that you can delete your unwanted shots.’
      • ‘She walked over to her closet and pulled out her camera, loading the large 33 mm with black and white film.’
      • ‘This does require a little more expertise than just being able to load film into the camera.’
      • ‘This is from when the camera went off when I was loading the film.’
      • ‘The problem was cured by making absolutely certain that the negatives are pushed all the way to the bottom of the drum, and that the bend in the film is toward the middle of the drum when loading.’
      • ‘She returned shortly to request another roll of film because she believed she had loaded the first one improperly.’
      insert, put, place, fit, slide, slot
      View synonyms
    3. 3.3Computing Transfer (a program or data) into memory, or into the central processor from storage.
      • ‘The fairly close times of the two C versions tell us that most of the execution time is spent loading the program.’
      • ‘This takes a different approach to most of the other software, loading different programs to cope with different sections of the editing process, from capture through to creating a final product.’
      • ‘It forces the dynamic linker/loader to load the simulator first, then loads the program and its libraries into the simulator.’
      • ‘These represent programs that are loaded into memory.’
      • ‘Once your program is loaded into memory, the CPU is really the limiting factor.’
  • 4Add an extra charge to (an insurance premium) in the case of a poorer risk.

    • ‘If capital markets were efficient, the default risk premium would be loaded exclusively on to the debt of the over-borrower; there would be no free riding.’
    • ‘The money is generated by loading the insurance premiums paid by credit unions to ECCU and passing the resulting income on to the ILCU.’
    • ‘Can life insurers load their premium if their policyholders work or live in trophy buildings and constructions that are potential terrorist targets?’
    • ‘In the case of adverse claims, premiums will be loaded for the next year.’
    • ‘But head of marketing, Ciaran Mahon, said drivers who have incurred six points or more will have their premiums loaded.’

Phrases

  • get a load of

    • informal Used to draw attention to someone or something.

      ‘get a load of what we've just done’
      • ‘As an aside, get a load of India's second innings…’
      • ‘Just get a load of his 1940s zoot suit and those size 20 yellow sneakers.’
      • ‘‘I'm sorry, I just can't get over the size of those udders,’ I told him, ribbing Jon the entire time to get a load of those udders.’
      • ‘Wait till they get a load of their long-awaited Vatican III and blow a gasket.’
      • ‘The barkeep, cleaning a shot glass with a dirty rag, turns and shakes his head, ‘Would you get a load of that?’’
      • ‘This year, you don't have to visit Yosemite National Park to get a load of its wonderful wildflower show.’
      • ‘Can't wait till all those anti-children's issues candidates get a load of this resolute manifesto.’
      • ‘If you think the name's weird, wait till you get a load of the ingredients: vodka, Laphroaig single-malt Scotch and Pernod.’
      • ‘And speaking of mental pictures - just get a load of that gorgeous cover art!’
      • ‘But get a load of this, he is a man with a plan, and he knows where to start.’
  • get (or have) a load on

    • informal Become drunk.

      • ‘We drunkards, we sozzleheads, we gindogs, need to get a load on where we can trust the bartender to help us along, not look out for our safety.’
  • load the bases

    • (of the team at bat) fill all three bases with runners; (of a pitcher) allow all three bases to be occupied by runners.

      • ‘In another game during my miserable start, I worked into a jam by loading the bases.’
      • ‘Wisely selling the play, he hustled to first base and was safe, loading the bases.’
      • ‘The Red Sox loaded the bases in the ninth inning with nobody out, but they didn't score.’
      • ‘They closed the gap to 7-5 by the eighth inning, then loaded the bases in both the eighth and ninth, before finally losing 7-6.’
      • ‘On June 11, he retired two batters to end the seventh, then loaded the bases (walk, single, hit batsman) against two lefty hitters and a switch hitter in the eighth.’
  • load the dice against/in favor of someone

    • Put someone at a disadvantage or advantage.

      • ‘Indeed it suggests that Waugh was loading the dice in favor of Tony, manipulating his reader's emotions in a manner worthy of Wilde's Dickens.’
  • take a (or the) load off one's feet

    • Sit or lie down.

      • ‘Doing so will take a load off your feet, and prevent your brain from becoming clogged, cluttered or crashing like your hapless personal computer.’
      • ‘Jo pointed towards the screen door, ‘Come into the sun room. You can sit in my comfortable rockers and take a load off your feet.’’
      take a seat, seat oneself, settle down, be seated, take a chair
      View synonyms
  • take a load off someone's mind

    • Bring someone relief from anxiety.

      • ‘It would certainly take a load off the actor's mind that he/she may have lost Oscar because he wasn't funny enough or couldn't reach that high C, or been able to emote enough to bring out the tears.’
      • ‘Knowing that all of my reminders are safe and can be checked easily from one place definitely takes a load off my mind.’
      • ‘In the meantime, pop in your favorite movie and take a load off your mind, because you deserve it.’

Origin

Old English lād ‘way, journey, conveyance’, of Germanic origin: related to German Leite, also to lead; compare with lode. The verb dates from the late 15th century.

Pronunciation

load

/loʊd//lōd/