Definition of living wage in English:

living wage


  • [in singular] A wage that is high enough to maintain a normal standard of living.

    • ‘We want living wages for people - real jobs, living wages.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, no one in Washington talks much about living wages, increasing the minimum wage, indexing it for inflation or expanding the earned-income tax credit.’
    • ‘Others are pursuing area-wide minimum wages set at levels closer to a living wage.’
    • ‘However, when they arrive many discover that even a living wage is hard to maintain.’
    • ‘The higher retail prices of Fair Trade goods in turn maintain higher producer prices for family farmers and living wages on larger enterprises.’
    • ‘Retail workers have no organized voice to ensure their safety, nor to gain them a living wage and benefits.’
    • ‘Conservation is well paid only at the highest level, and apprentices seldom earn a living wage.’
    • ‘The first is a decent living wage for public sector workers.’
    • ‘Advocates of the minimum wage, living wage, and family wage never even raise this fairly critical question.’
    • ‘But the real impact of the living wage may be its effect on state and city minimum wages.’
    • ‘We must raise the minimum wage to a living wage so that no one who works 40 hours a week lives in poverty.’
    • ‘They also plan to pay themselves a living wage with benefits, and vote on major issues.’
    • ‘As a county councillor and someone who has to go out and earn a living wage, I know how hard it is for the vast majority of residents to find this increase in their Council Tax bills.’
    • ‘Most jobs that former welfare recipients have found don't pay living wages and don't offer employer-provided health insurance.’
    • ‘Courtney believes to keep skilled positions in the United States and employees earning living wages, a shake-up must occur in management.’
    • ‘For decades, grassroots organizations of low-income people have been fighting for living wages, affordable housing, adequate health care and decent jobs in their communities.’
    • ‘Religious groups and labor unions started talking about living wages in the early 1900s, which led to the passage of the federal minimum in 1938.’
    • ‘One can argue that the displacement consequences of the living wage are minimal because so few workers are affected.’
    • ‘The male breadwinner family, if not in decline, is under threat with women increasingly able to earn a living wage and control their own fertility.’
    • ‘Dancers in the company make a living wage by Cuban standards, about as much as professionals like doctors do.’


living wage

/ˈˌliviNG ˈwāj/