Definition of live off (or on) the fat of the land in US English:

live off (or on) the fat of the land

phrase

  • Have the best of everything.

    • ‘The rank and file, I'm sorry to say, have lived off the fat of the land put there by our union forefathers and foremothers.’
    • ‘I wished that I was her, and that I had naturally curly hair and that I was an artist, living off the fat of the land, as it were, because it seemed totally alien to me that your family would ever support your own artistic inclinations.’
    • ‘Since Rachel was busy living off the fat of the land (read: her mother) she told me she could drive me to school until my dad decided I was responsible enough to own a car myself.’
    • ‘Check the long lines at stands operated by nocturnal vendors, men literally living off the fat of the land, for clear indication of how many people confront-on a nightly basis-the outlawed practice of eating far too near bedtime.’
    • ‘After establishing herself in her parent's house ‘living on the fat of the land,’ Katherine began gathering information about her friends' and family's business affairs.’
    • ‘As the play opens under a setting sun we see the care and love the two men have for each other, epitomised by George's tale of a small farm where they can both ‘live off the fat of the land’.’
    • ‘It could be said that he lives off the fat of the land.’
    • ‘Thanks to the ingenuity of these contraptions' designers and purveyors (people who, one might say, live off the fat of the land), the toils of Sisyphus have been transformed into a healthful pastime.’
    • ‘But there are ways to live off the fat of the land without bleeding it dry.’
    • ‘It is also too simplistic to think of all monks as living off the fat of the land and benefiting from the labour of others.’
    lead a very comfortable life, be very rich, want for nothing, live off the fat of the land
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