Main definitions of live in US English:

: live1live2

live1

verb

  • 1no object Remain alive.

    ‘the doctors said she had only six months to live’
    ‘both cats lived to a ripe age’
    • ‘In September 2000, she was diagnosed with bone cancer and given six months to live.’
    • ‘An earlier study found that actors who won Oscars lived an average of four years longer than the competition.’
    • ‘They gave him three or at best four years to live, leaving him in a quandary about the ethics of standing again for parliament.’
    • ‘In other words, women are living longer knowing they have breast cancer.’
    • ‘People are now living four to five years longer than in the 1970s, and young people are taller than previous generations.’
    • ‘In January he was given six months to live but survived longer than doctors predicted.’
    • ‘He has been given a 20 per cent chance of survival and doctors say he might have three to six months to live.’
    • ‘Though the boy had died instantly on impact, the man lived, and remained in critical condition at a New Jersey hospital.’
    • ‘Only McKinlay survived, living to the age of 95 when he died in Glasgow in 1983.’
    • ‘Some patients die within one year of diagnosis, whereas others live longer than six years.’
    • ‘By the following morning doctors had told Lorraine that she had a rare form of cervical cancer and only six months to live.’
    • ‘We should celebrate the fact that people are living longer and remain in good health.’
    • ‘The Battle of Britain claimed 544 allied lives and nearly half of the survivors never lived to see the final victory in 1945.’
    • ‘Scientists said yesterday they believe they have found a formula which will lead to cats and dogs living longer.’
    • ‘A young cancer sufferer with only weeks to live spent his last days raising money to fight the killer disease.’
    • ‘Pensioners are living longer.’
    • ‘We can live without breathing for only a few minutes, yet we give it very little thought.’
    • ‘Peter's mother was called as he was expected to have only twenty four hours to live.’
    • ‘In one Scottish study of terminally ill cancer patients, those given vitamin C lived four times as long as those who weren't given it.’
    • ‘That cat is going to live to be 20 and shows every indication of getting meaner by the minute.’
    1. 1.1 Be alive at a specified time.
      ‘he lived four centuries ago’
      • ‘It is also instructive to remember that he lived at a time when the United States was undergoing a renewed interest in nation-building.’
      • ‘Great oaks and trees that lived centuries ago held their broken branches, still fashioned to the ground by decaying roots.’
      • ‘She lived at such an exciting time in Dundee's history.’
      • ‘He lived a long time ago.’
      • ‘They are postcards from a very distant past, putting faces on people who lived centuries ago.’
      • ‘The Archer lived four and a half thousand years ago, about the time of the first construction at Stonehenge three miles from his grave.’
      • ‘My tastes are definitely different from what I would have liked, if I had lived five centuries ago.’
      • ‘The words of his mother would probably arouse jealous feelings among parents living a century and a half ago.’
      • ‘He was a soldier who lived centuries ago in India.’
      • ‘Ninety per cent of all scientists who have ever lived are alive today.’
      • ‘An isolated population is a group of individuals who are descended from a founding population who lived some time ago.’
      • ‘It's not just about some guy who lived centuries ago.’
      exist, be alive, be, have being, have life
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Spend one's life in a particular way or under particular circumstances.
      ‘people are living in fear in the wake of the shootings’
      with object and adverbial ‘he was living a life of luxury in Australia’
      • ‘One million children are still living in poverty in Britain, despite the government's pledge to reduce child poverty.’
      • ‘There are 291 million people living below the poverty line in sub-Saharan Africa.’
      • ‘Although there's no cure, cats can live quite healthy lives for a while after infection.’
      • ‘It is a home equipped with the latest technology to enable vulnerable people to remain living independently in their own homes for as long as possible.’
      • ‘Forty years after the War on Poverty began, about 30 percent of black children are still living in poverty.’
      • ‘I'm sure many aircrews lived under the same circumstances at that time.’
      • ‘Do you think living beyond our means is a modern malady?’
      • ‘If we learn to live thriftily and remember the importance of helping our neighbours then we can find ways to adjust.’
      • ‘He personally lived frugally and spent the research funding entrusted to him with the same care.’
      • ‘Most vets and cat experts agree that indoor cats live longer, healthier lives.’
      • ‘‘The residents there all live in fear, and so would I,’ he added.’
      • ‘I, for one, would not produce a child that would have to live under these circumstances.’
      • ‘Those who could left the country; those who remained lived under the threat of torture and violent death.’
      • ‘As many as one in four single women pensioners now live in poverty.’
      • ‘Seniors need supportive environments to maintain good health and remain living independently.’
      • ‘People have been living under these pitiful circumstances for decades.’
      • ‘Instead of enjoying the fact that we can live comfortably, we spend our time looking to see who is living just that little bit more comfortably than us.’
      • ‘He lived well and spent freely, renting flats in Chelsea and Brighton, employing servants, owning race horses and running a Rolls-Royce.’
      • ‘Most tell us they are keen to remain living independently in their own homes for as long as possible with the necessary social services support to help them do that.’
      • ‘Why are the numbers of women living with HIV increasing faster than the number of men?’
      pass one's life, spend one's life, lead one's life, have a life, have a lifestyle
      experience, spend, pass, lead, have, go through, undergo
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 Supply oneself with the means of subsistence.
      ‘they live by hunting and fishing’
      • ‘If you make up your mind to live from writing, it is prudent to make certain that your work is good, he added.’
      • ‘They lived off their own fertile land, happy and contented.’
      • ‘They live by hunting and gathering.’
      • ‘We lived from subsistence farming, growing sweet potatoes, corn, some sugarcane, and ginger.’
      • ‘He lived by gambling professionally for over a decade.’
      survive, make a living, earn one's living, eke out a living
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4 Survive in someone's mind; be remembered.
      ‘only the name lived on’
      • ‘This massacre will forever live in our minds.’
      • ‘In any Championship is something that lives forever in the minds and hearts of every one involved.’
      • ‘His words have lived with me ever since.’
      • ‘Songwriter and singer Ollie Cole has an impeccable ear for a good melody and this one lives long in the mind.’
      • ‘He will live on in our memories.’
    5. 1.5 Have an exciting or fulfilling life.
      ‘he couldn't wait to get out of school and really start living’
      • ‘In other words, the blues is about having lived whereas the violin draws heavily on a technical ability that can be gained in a practice room.’
      • ‘I think I wanted a TV to distract me from the fact I was breathing, not living!’
      • ‘Get out there and start living, you never know how much longer it is all going to last.’
      • ‘The voice is calling us to leave our foolish fears behind, to take risks, to trust, to begin to really live.’
      • ‘I have the energy of a 30-year-old and I want to get out there and live!’
      • ‘Maybe you should start living instead of just watching everyone else.’
      enjoy oneself, enjoy life, have fun, be happy, live life to the full
      View synonyms
  • 2no object, with adverbial Make one's home in a particular place or with a particular person.

    ‘I've lived in New England all my life’
    ‘they lived with his grandparents’
    • ‘Later on I overheard him saying that this was his first Bonfire night in the UK as he'd only lived here for six months.’
    • ‘Scurvy is still seen, very occasionally, among old people living alone who neglect their diet.’
    • ‘We had been friends since kindergarten; she lived across the street from me.’
    • ‘Although both children now have jobs, they choose to remain living at home.’
    • ‘She has been living in Britain for nine years and is studying at Portsmouth University.’
    • ‘I lived there for six months, and found it to be a pleasant rural village.’
    • ‘In 1993 he moved to Sweden where he lived and worked for four years, mostly in the building trade.’
    • ‘After living there for six months, Mark and I got married and a year later moved to East Harlem.’
    • ‘The lucky ones have grandparents living locally who are willing to help out on a regular basis.’
    • ‘His parents spent weeks living at hospital as he recovered from his surgery and still have to take him for check-ups on a yearly basis.’
    • ‘South African citizens living abroad at the time of the elections will not be allowed to vote.’
    • ‘Did you or you parents ever live in a house of their own?’
    • ‘Leopards are not the only mammals in which daughters live close to their mothers.’
    • ‘He was just a divorced man living alone in a really big house.’
    • ‘She recently emerged from spending a year living among a closed Buddhist community on Holy Island.’
    • ‘He later moved to Germany and then Italy where he lived for three years.’
    • ‘Rubbish on spare land in Burnley is causing anger among residents living nearby.’
    • ‘In the past up to four generations have traditionally lived under the same roof.’
    • ‘In 1903, Jack London, the novelist and journalist, spent a year living among the people of the slums of the east end of London.’
    • ‘Police were alerted by a resident living in the flats opposite after the alarm was activated.’
    reside, have one's home, have one's residence, be settled
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • as I live and breathe

    • Used, especially in spoken English, to express one's surprise at coming across someone or something.

      ‘good Lord, Jack Stone, as I live and breathe!’
      • ‘Dawn Tinsley, as I live and breathe…’
      • ‘Well, well, as I live and breathe, it's Nellie.’
      • ‘‘Well, well,’ she said, ‘Malak Harr, as I live and breathe.’’
      • ‘‘Well, as I live and breathe… if it ain't Hallie Lennox, ‘he said in an unmistakable Savannah drawl.’
  • live and breathe something

    • Be extremely interested in or enthusiastic about a particular subject or activity and so devote a great deal of one's time to it.

      ‘they live and breathe Italy and all things Italian’
      • ‘He lives and breathes wine, tasting the products of his competitors and those from other countries.’
      • ‘He admits to being a man who lives and breathes his job.’
      • ‘You can see he lives and breathes the sport.’
      • ‘This is a woman who has lived and breathed politics since her teens.’
      • ‘If you want to work in the music industry, you have to live and breathe music.’
      • ‘When you live and breathe your product, it's hard to realize that customers aren't as passionate about it as you are.’
      • ‘He lived and breathed mathematics and philosophy.’
      • ‘When you're in this business you live and breathe it.’
      • ‘He lives and breathes pantomime and every year puts heart and soul into his productions.’
      • ‘I lived and breathed gymnastics throughout my childhood and only stopped training in my twenties.’
  • live and let live

    • proverb You should tolerate the opinions and behavior of others so that they will similarly tolerate your own.

      • ‘Monika's philosophy in life is to live and let live.’
      • ‘Whatever happened to the concept of live and let live?’
      • ‘Soon after the Great War, the majority of Americans turned away from concern about foreign affairs, adopting an attitude of live and let live.’
      • ‘I hope that the Council will agree to live and let live.’
      • ‘Our father always taught us live and let live.’
      • ‘We all have different interests, so live and let live!’
      • ‘Perhaps this is asking too much and my view too utopian but I appeal to all involved to live and let live.’
      • ‘Isn't it time we all learned to live and let live?’
      • ‘In this neck of Los Angeles, people live and let live.’
      • ‘Stating that she was devastated by the arson attack, she said that all she wanted to do was live and let live and she hoped that she could do that in a different part of the city.’
  • live dangerously

    • Do something risky, especially on a habitual basis.

      • ‘City were living dangerously but as the clock ticked closer to 90 minutes they looked to have weathered the worst of the storm.’
      • ‘We lived dangerously for about 20 minutes but we got through that and the game had levelled itself out,’ he recalled.’
      • ‘These are some of the most beautiful places to live, but living here is living dangerously.’
      • ‘And more and more Americans are living dangerously, moving to regions in this country highly vulnerable to natural disasters.’
      • ‘He doesn't live dangerously, but puts others in terrible danger!’
      • ‘This is one girl who likes living dangerously.’
      • ‘Derby are still living dangerously, just four points ahead of third-bottom Manchester City, after losing 2-1 at home to Arsenal.’
      • ‘After having lived dangerously for several years, I really did not want to involved in this type of case.’
      • ‘Are you trying to be insulting or do you like living dangerously?’
      • ‘Having braved the elements once I decided to live dangerously.’
  • live in hope

    • Be or remain optimistic about something.

      • ‘His mother still lives in hope of one day finding out what became of her 11-year-old son.’
      • ‘We ask everyone to join with us in praying for Abigail and live in hope for the future.’
      • ‘‘We have been disappointed too many times to expect action being taken but you live in hope,’ he said.’
      • ‘I fear he will not bow to my pressure but I live in hope.’
      • ‘With the council telling me a year ago they had no money for widening the road or putting in sleeping policeman, I do not live in hope.’
      • ‘I live in hope, but will no doubt end up in despair!’
      • ‘We have been living in hope since she went missing and we were praying this was not Leanne.’
      • ‘However, one lives in hope that future years may actually witness some inspirational figures.’
      • ‘He lives in hope that he can find more people willing to walk a financial tightrope so that others can tread the boards.’
      • ‘Up to that stage we had still lived in hope that were was some reason why she was still alive and hadn't been in touch.’
  • live in the past

    • 1Have old-fashioned or outdated ideas and attitudes.

      • ‘The Minister is still living in the past and as a result we are not gaining the jobs we should have.’
      • ‘Those who wish to live in the past and apply outdated labels to all Northern Ireland fans are the real bigots.’
      • ‘Policy-makers will be accused of living in the past and using the wrong instruments to stimulate the Scottish economy.’
      • ‘It would be wrong to assume that Christians are all fuddy-duddies living in the past who are completely against embracing the power of advertising.’
      • ‘Mrs Barnie continued: ‘I understand the parish council has their own rules, but I think they are living in the past.’’
      • ‘‘I say to those who want to live in the past - you stay in the past, we are moving on,’ said Mr Duncan Smith.’
      • ‘He says they are living in the past by what he calls ‘banging on’ about nominal interest rates 13 years ago.’
      • ‘Those of us who argued from the start that the single currency was misconceived, and that membership would be a disaster, were dismissed by the Prime Minister as xenophobes who were living in the past.’
      • ‘There was a BBC discussion about Time zones today - with the thread that unless we synchronised with the rest of Europe we were living in the past and that trade and the economy suffered.’
      • ‘The Scottish Football Association are living in the past and they do not have any concept of equality.’
      1. 1.1Dwell on or reminisce at length about past events.
        • ‘Yet the greatest obstacles to achieving are a lack of self belief, living in the past and a desire to be perfect.’
        • ‘She needed to stop living in the past and stop wallowing in past sorrows.’
        • ‘Many people live in the past, over and over again, and they never catch up with the present.’
        • ‘Sometimes people waste their own time by living in the past.’
        • ‘Later in the book it mentions people's habit of living in the past all the time instead of concentrating on the present and the future.’
  • live it up

    • informal Spend one's time in an extremely enjoyable way, typically by spending a great deal of money or engaging in an exciting social life.

      • ‘They have lived it up and spent their way all throughout the eighties, never saving a dime.’
      • ‘They and the whole class they represent will spend the rest of the summer living it up at a whirl of social events.’
      • ‘Most eighteen-year-olds I knew were in college, partying, and living it up.’
      • ‘But she denied her kids had been abandoned as she lived it up on boozy nights in Turkish bars and clubs with friends.’
      • ‘I feel like I should be living it up, having an exciting life.’
      • ‘I thought ‘young people today’ spent all their dosh on mobile phones, gadgets and living it up.’
      • ‘By rights, I should be a millionaire, living it up on some island somewhere.’
      • ‘I'm not a great one for living it up till the early hours but I love breakfast meetings.’
      • ‘She survives on £50 a week state hand-outs while he lives it up in style after winning £1.5 million on the Lottery.’
      • ‘They spent this week living it up in Cape Town instead of acclimatising to altitude.’
      live extravagantly, live in the lap of luxury, live in clover
      View synonyms
  • live out of a suitcase

    • Live or stay somewhere on a temporary basis and with only a limited selection of one's belongings, typically because one's occupation requires a great deal of traveling.

      • ‘‘I went through a spell when I was always on the go, living out of a suitcase,’ she says.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, by this point I was getting tired of living out of a suitcase and I didn't enjoy the city as much as I might have done.’
      • ‘Michael is living out of a suitcase at the moment.’
      • ‘At the end of the season we normally have a holiday, but to be honest it would be nice to have two weeks where we weren't living out of a suitcase.’
      • ‘Her parents told her she had to think about buying a home instead of living out of a suitcase.’
      • ‘Since 1995, I have more or less lived out of a suitcase.’
      • ‘Alex spoke about the strain of touring and being away from home for long periods of time, especially the hassles of living out of a suitcase for months on end.’
      • ‘I hate flying, airports and living out of a suitcase.’
      • ‘She just needed time to adjust, after living out of a suitcase for seven years.’
      • ‘He spent so much time in recent years criss-crossing the Atlantic, living out of a suitcase and seeing much of the world through the car window.’
  • live one's own life

    • Follow one's own plans and principles independent of others.

      • ‘If readers get one thought from this book, it is that you have to live your own life and make the choices that are right for you.’
      • ‘A good rule to follow is to live your own life and let others do likewise.’
      • ‘On the whole, people are happy to let you get on with living your own life.’
      • ‘She is a widely travelled, disciplined woman, a formidable figure in public life committed to living her own life, listening to her own heart and not to anyone else's.’
      • ‘I enjoy living my own life, going where I want to go and doing what I want to do.’
      • ‘Frances, naturally, wants to live her own life, not her mom's.’
      • ‘Since I have done this course, however, I have got my confidence back and want to live my own life again.’
      • ‘So for the last decade or more, I've lived my own life, never wanted any of the things that the people around me rated as important, and just got on with my own thing.’
      • ‘Just because you've hooked up with someone else doesn't mean you can't continue living your own life!’
      • ‘You have to walk your own path, or you can't live your own life.’
  • live rough

    • Live and sleep outdoors as a consequence of having no proper home.

      • ‘It is now believed that he may be living rough in the South London area.’
      • ‘The new clinic is being built to aid the 500 homeless children living rough in the city.’
      • ‘Afterwards Matthew went to various friends' houses, but I later found out he was living rough for at least a month.’
      • ‘He was a drug-addicted down and out living rough.’
      • ‘She says up to 1,000 children are now living rough, sleeping under hedges and bridges and begging to survive, many of them glue sniffing.’
      • ‘While homelessness is increasing nationally, Waterford has only a handful of people living rough on the streets, according to a number of charitable agencies.’
      • ‘I came across people living rough in caravans and junkyards.’
      • ‘Vulnerable people living rough in Lancaster face a waiting list for emergency accommodation.’
      • ‘At the age of 10, he was living rough with his older sister and 9-year-old brother after being abandoned in Sydney by their mother.’
      • ‘A man who was living rough in Swindon has been jailed for eight weeks after a court heard how he threw two computer monitors on the floor at a bail hostel.’
  • live to fight another day

    • Survive a particular experience or ordeal.

      • ‘In the end, both teams somehow lived to fight another day.’
      • ‘Leeds United live to fight another day - thanks to a dubious penalty which gave them a priceless 2-1 victory over Manchester City.’
      • ‘Hopefully the club itself will survive and live to fight another day.’
      • ‘The boxers' relatives and friends pay the admission fees, buy food and gym apparel, and the gym lives to fight another day.’
      • ‘He's had a fantastic year and will live to fight another day.’
      • ‘‘I would buy an old house, do it up and sell it on and live to fight another day,’ he said.’
      • ‘I'll live to fight another day on health care, environmental concerns and sensible gun legislation.’
      • ‘‘I'll live to fight another day and I'll be there again,’ he added positively.’
      • ‘If you are able to survive a bad or indifferent season, you live to fight another day.’
      • ‘The library was facing the axe in a council bid to save cash, but the public fought back to force a U-turn and the library lived to fight another day.’
  • live to regret something

    • Come to wish that one had not done something.

      ‘those who put work before their family life often live to regret it’
      • ‘Sadly, many women made the mistake of opting for the lower married woman's stamp and lived to regret it.’
      • ‘And if you so much as tell one single soul about this, you will live to regret it.’
      • ‘Some people commit minor offences when they are young and live to regret it.’
      • ‘Did you live to regret it or was it the best thing you've ever done?’
      • ‘Engage any railway buff in a conversation about old lines and you might live to regret it.’
      • ‘It was thoroughly distasteful and I bet he is living to regret it now.’
      • ‘If we don't let the police do their job we may all live to regret it.’
      • ‘So if the government fails to take this opportunity, it may live to regret it.’
      • ‘It will cost us money, but if we hand this problem on to the next generation we will live to regret it.’
      • ‘As soon as I'd accepted the dare I knew I would live to regret it.’
  • live to tell the tale

    • Survive a dangerous experience and be able to tell others about it.

      • ‘These days you're not a big wave surfer until you've climbed aboard a 60-footer and actually lived to tell the tale - which not everyone winds up doing.’
      • ‘Nelson fought the Battle of Trafalgar from the deck of his flagship, HMS Victory, close to the Rock in 1805 but never lived to tell the tale.’
      • ‘Not many of the British servicemen lived to tell the tale of the horrendous captivity that followed - thousands were starved, beaten or worked to death in slave labour camps.’
      • ‘She has seen it all, soldiering on through addiction, sexual abuse and destructive relationships - and has lived to tell the tale.’
      • ‘I will be scarred for life and this has caused us both physical and mental damage but I suppose we were lucky to live to tell the tale.’
      • ‘Thankfully, people survive cancer and live to tell the tale.’
      • ‘They have both looked down the barrel of a gun - and lived to tell the tale.’
      • ‘There are not many who can say they lived through the reign of Queen Victoria, World War I, the 1916 rising, the War of Independence, World War II and Hiroshima and lived to tell the tale.’
      • ‘I sense she still can't believe how lucky she is to have lived to tell the tale.’
      • ‘They seemed overwhelmed by the sheer charisma of a man who has defied the world's most powerful nation for forty years and lived to tell the tale.’
  • live under a rock

    • informal Lack basic knowledge of current events or popular culture.

      ‘in case you have been living under a rock, America is heading toward a presidential election’
  • live with oneself

    • Be able to retain one's self-respect as a consequence of one's actions.

      ‘taking money from children—how can you live with yourself?’
      • ‘If he got hurt she would never be able to live with herself.’
      • ‘I would have never been able to live with myself if anything had happened to you.’
      • ‘I cringed through the entire twenty minutes, and I'm pretty sure the presenters are never going to be able to live with themselves, let alone admit to other people what they do for a living.’
      • ‘What the world at large deems success might not feel like success deep in your heart, and you need to be able to live with yourself.’
      • ‘If something happens to him, I'm not sure I'll be able to live with myself.’
      • ‘I would not be able to live with myself if I did not own up to what I have done.’
      • ‘But I don't think he'll ever be able to live with himself for taking our daughter's life.’
      • ‘His wife dissuaded him, however, telling him that he would never be able to live with himself if he concluded so sordid a deal.’
      • ‘I didn't really feel I would be able to live with myself if I'd gone into that broadcast and said nothing because I was frightened to say what I believe in.’
      • ‘That's the only way I've been able to live with myself over the last four years, by forgetting it ever happened.’
  • long live —!

    • Said to express loyalty or support for a specified person or thing.

      ‘long live the Queen!’
      • ‘Industry is dead, long live the new information economy.’
      • ‘Long live any artist who can take the time to produce an album that represents the music they love.’
      • ‘Long live freedom - use your vote at the next Elections!’
      • ‘I just want to say, long live India and long live Indian cricket.’
      • ‘There was an amazingly diverse audience at the show, proving that Celtic music is not just for old folk from the old country - long live the fiddle!’
      • ‘Differences exist - long live the differences!’
      • ‘Long live the movement for global democracy.’
      • ‘The evil queen is dead, long live King Geoffrey.’
      • ‘Cue a fanfare, followed by a rousing rendition of ‘the king is dead, long live the king’.’
      • ‘No longer will the Internet be seen as a place to buy things cheaper - long live the rich.’
  • where one lives

    • informal At, to, or in the right, vital, or most vulnerable spot.

      ‘it gets me where I live’
      • ‘Our readership as a whole is extremely important, and once in a great while a reader reaches out and touches me right where I live.’
      • ‘These are songs that will move you, and touch you right where you live.’
      • ‘It is rare for me to encounter a criticism that hits me where I live.’
      • ‘It hits them where they live because the executives can be held personally responsible for the damage to the company.’
      • ‘The decisions we make on these issues are going to affect you where you live.’
  • you (or we) live and learn

    • Used, especially in spoken English, to acknowledge that a fact is new to one.

      • ‘Oh well, we live and learn - and I've learned that life is better being a shrewd saver, rather than a bonkers borrower!’
      • ‘There's a lot of things I wouldn't have done if I had to do it again, but you live and learn.’
      • ‘Answering the suggestion that he would have landed at least one of the penalties, he added ‘hindsight's a great thing… you live and learn’.’
      • ‘I thought it was better odds than the lottery, but you live and learn.’
      • ‘I don't know… you live and learn, maybe there are people who go around just assaulting young fellas.’
  • you haven't lived

    • Used, especially in spoken English, as a way of enthusiastically recommending something to someone who has not experienced it.

      ‘you haven't lived until you've tasted their lobster ravioli’
      • ‘You haven't lived until you've had Japanese Ice Cream!’
      • ‘I know that some people may find it hard to understand, but in my mind if you haven't been in a helicopter you haven't lived.’
      • ‘However, you haven't lived until you have witnessed the New Year firework displays that Disney produces.’
      • ‘And when in Glasgow, never miss having tea at the Willow Tea Rooms, or you haven't lived.’
      • ‘Seriously, if you haven't tried a nice chilled gazpacho, you haven't lived.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • live something down

    • Succeed in making others forget something embarrassing that has happened.

      • ‘I was never, ever allowed to live the incident down by my housemates, who took great delight in reciting it to everyone who came round for the rest of the year.’
      • ‘Let's just hope I get it right or I'll never live it down!’
      • ‘As time went by, the incident became a memory, but the crew chief never really lived it down.’
      • ‘It had taken two full years for me to live that episode down.’
      • ‘One guy left his house keys in my bedroom one Christmas Eve and never lived it down since.’
      • ‘He'd never live it down if he turned up at the park wearing purple.’
      • ‘If people have made mistakes, they should be able to live them down.’
      • ‘My boyfriend would never let me live it down if we lost.’
      • ‘And yes, the situation is hilarious and I will never live it down… my sister won't let me forget!’
      • ‘She didn't get to the Olympics and has never been able to live it down.’
  • live off (or on)

    • 1Depend on (someone or something) as a source of income or support.

      ‘if you think you're going to live off me for the rest of your life, you're mistaken’
      • ‘He lives off investments and money from his wife's life insurance policy.’
      • ‘In 1988, he was taken to court for rates still owed on his last pub and revealed that he was living on dole money.’
      • ‘It is one of the poorest countries in the world, landlocked with poor transport facilities and most of the population living on subsistence farming.’
      • ‘It's tempting to spend all your money and live off the state, or simply emigrate.’
      • ‘They had brought no possessions, and as islanders who had lived off fishing and farming, they had no real professional skills.’
      • ‘The majority of the population continues to live off subsistence agriculture, in villages or the slums that have sprung up around major urban centres.’
      • ‘Both of them are still living off his parents' money.’
      • ‘Instead, they continued living off their parents.’
      • ‘Her days as a single mother living on income support must now seem like a distant memory.’
      • ‘This country has lived on somebody else's money - whether it has come from Asia, or America, or Europe - for too long.’
      1. 1.1Have (a particular amount of money) with which to buy food and other necessities.
        • ‘The poorest 20 percent were living on a weekly income of less than $266.’
        • ‘I think it's a disgrace that elderly people are forced to live on such a low income.’
        • ‘‘Too many elderly people are living on a low income because rate increases have been much higher than pension increases,’ he said.’
        • ‘She told me the money she lives on isn't enough to cover the bills.’
        • ‘The scheme is administered by the health boards, who pay rent supplements to tenants living on low incomes in private rented accommodation, to help them with their weekly rent.’
        • ‘Some people are simply not earning enough money to live on and must make stark choices between eating or heating.’
        • ‘We lived off his monthly income of $986, plus housing allowance, for a few months before I got a part-time job.’
        • ‘Relative poverty means someone living on an income of less than 60% of the average income or €164 per week.’
        • ‘Many people in rural areas are living on incomes well below what most people enjoy.’
        • ‘One quarter of single parent families and pensioners are living on an income below the poverty line.’
      2. 1.2Subsist on (a particular type of food).
        • ‘For weeks they slept under banana trees and lived on scavenged food.’
        • ‘There is some debate as to whether early hominids were scavengers living off the remains of animals brought down and killed by other beasts, or whether these groups were hunters in their own right.’
        • ‘Dales farmers are being encouraged to swap sheep for herds of traditional types of cattle like blue greys and short horns that can survive the harsh winters living off the rough grasses.’
        • ‘We've been here two days living off food we find.’
        • ‘The calf must have survived by living off straw in the barn.’
        • ‘It is a simple life: they live on fish, and there are few predators.’
        • ‘The terrified man was so intent not to be discovered that he refused to travel far for food and often lived off a diet of twigs and berries.’
        • ‘Maybe they caught fish, or perhaps lived on the animals on the mountain side.’
        • ‘She survived for a few years by living off of food scraps reluctantly donated by the citizens.’
        • ‘They live off begged and stolen food, in a room blackened by the smoke of the struggling stove.’
        subsist on, feed off, feed on, rely for nourishment on, thrive on, depend on
        View synonyms
      3. 1.3(of a person) eat, or seem to eat, only (a particular type of food)
        ‘she used to live on bacon and tomato sandwiches’
        • ‘Being born and raised in California and living off of Mexican food was going to make my life a bit interesting over here.’
        • ‘In his whole life he had never experienced such complex food; living off ready-meals for the last years seemed to have made his mouth accustomed to blandness.’
        • ‘Exclusive reliance on the car is the equivalent of living on fast food burgers - there should be no surprise if we get sick.’
        • ‘Some folks here at work tried low carb, living on bacon for several weeks.’
        • ‘To their dismay they found out that many of them failed to take greens, leafy vegetables, pulses and cereals, and instead lived on fast food and colas.’
        • ‘We're living off pate and dips.’
        • ‘For some time, the patient has been living off junk food, in particular pizza with cold iced drinks.’
        • ‘Cooking natural ingredients from scratch is far cheaper than living off processed foods.’
        • ‘He lived on fast food, and cartons and unfinished takeaways lay in every corner of his home.’
        • ‘She lives on cake and soup, which she heats up on a little ring right there in her room.’
  • live out

    • (of an employee or student) reside away from the place where one works or studies.

      • ‘The Chalet has two staff, who live out.’
      • ‘Most students on four-year courses live out in their final year.’
      • ‘I'm looking for a job as a housekeeper or nanny to live in or live out.’
      • ‘Would you prefer a nanny who lives out?’
      • ‘If you're in halls and you plan to live out next year, you should start looking in the February or March before.’
  • live together

    • (especially of a couple not married to each other) share a home and have a sexual relationship.

      • ‘The couple had been living together for three years and were planning to buy a house.’
      • ‘They'd known each other their entire lives, and living together was a natural progression for them.’
      • ‘The couple was living together and the girl wanted to continue the relationship.’
      • ‘The couple were unmarried and lived together for nineteen years.’
      • ‘The couple had lived together for only ten days and were planning to get married.’
      • ‘It's really important that couples living together get the legal protection they need.’
      • ‘Your relationship changed quite drastically when you started living together.’
      • ‘In England and Wales over two million couples currently live together without being married.’
      • ‘At one time, a couple living together without being married was regarded as shameful.’
      • ‘They were seen together so often in New York that close friends considered them a couple, though they never lived together.’
  • live up to

    • 1Fulfill (expectations).

      • ‘James already has accomplished the near-impossible by living up to the hype that followed him into the league.’
      • ‘There is no question Martin has failed to live up to his advance billing.’
      • ‘When I was a kid, the circus never really lived up to my expectations.’
      • ‘Did they find the country lived up to their expectations?’
      • ‘Maybe it's just an overproduced theatrical event that didn't live up to all the hype.’
      • ‘When you have children, it becomes all about living up to their expectations.’
      • ‘I had heard about this wonder boy and he lived up to all I had heard.’
      • ‘The red pepper and goat's cheese tart lived up to expectations.’
      • ‘Essex, living up to its reputation, performed especially well in comparison to its East of England neighbours.’
      • ‘And in the first half, York lived up to their billing as favourites.’
      measure up to, match up to, come up to, reach, satisfy, fulfil, achieve, meet, equal, be equal to, be on a level with, compare with, admit of comparison, bear comparison with
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Fulfill (an undertaking)
        ‘the president lived up to his promise to set America swiftly on a new path’
        • ‘He completed his Cabinet less than a month after he became president-elect and lived up to his diversity vow.’
        • ‘Of the ones I know, or know of, there's about ten who have actually lived up to what they said they'd do.’
        • ‘He cites no international obligation that the U.S. has not lived up to.’
        • ‘He has not lived up to his promise to fully disclose the identities of his top money-collectors who bundle millions of dollars in campaign contributions.’
        • ‘‘The seller didn't live up to his promises,’ he says.’
  • live with

    • 1Share a home and have a sexual relationship with (someone to whom one is not married).

      • ‘He came to England but couldn't stand it so she decided she had to go and live with him in Cape Town.’
      • ‘Every man has to learn on his own how to live with a woman.’
      • ‘His position was not harmed by the fact that he lived with the party leader's daughter.’
      • ‘He said that he lived with his partner and her children, one of whom is disabled, and they treat him as their father.’
      • ‘Katie, we learn, lived with Paul for nine years until things started to go wrong.’
      • ‘It made me feel rather lonely, despite the fact that I was living with Scott.’
      • ‘It's impossible to know how they would act if they were stuck with living with these blokes in real life.’
      • ‘Barry knew of the relationship but continued to live with Amanda in the hope that the affair would end.’
      • ‘He married four times, and at one stage was living with one woman in London and another in the country, at weekends.’
      • ‘For many years he has lived with Jane in a house that they share in Islington.’
    • 2Accept or tolerate (something unpleasant)

      ‘our marriage was a failure—you have to learn to live with that fact’
      • ‘In the years since, Anne-Marie and her family have learned to live with epilepsy.’
      • ‘As the months ticked by, the question became more irritating, but he had to learn to live with it.’
      • ‘If one of you leaves then the decision is made and you have to learn to live with it.’
      • ‘It is a problem he has learned to live with and rugby and the exercise involved has helped him cope.’
      • ‘The people of Fulford need to accept that their properties are near a road and learn to live with the traffic.’
      • ‘Maybe Thomson learned to live with criticism and simply found the best way of dealing with it.’
      • ‘Chris is now free from the chronic pain and limitations that he was told he would have to learn to live with.’
      • ‘It had happened a long time ago and there was nothing he could do about it except learn to live with the nightmares.’
      • ‘It seems that, for now, Americans will just have to learn to live with aggressive bees.’
      • ‘I only hope he can learn to live with the guilt once he realises what he's done.’
  • live for

    • Regard as the purpose or most important aspect of one's life.

      ‘Tony lived for his painting’
  • live in

    • (of an employee or student) reside at the place where one works or studies.

  • live something out

    • 1Do in reality that which one has thought or dreamed about.

      ‘your wedding day is the one time that you can live out your most romantic fantasies’
      • ‘She's living out her dream.’
      • ‘I'm sure they would've been a lot happier if they were living out their dream onstage with a decent performer.’
      • ‘They can claim they are protecting the religion, when they are really living out their violent fantasies of revenge.’
      • ‘You spend every possible moment living that dream out, and soon it begins to take over your everyday life.’
      • ‘He had these fantasies, and unlike many people, he's lived them out.’
    • 2Spend the rest of one's life in a particular place or particular circumstances.

      ‘he lived out his days as a happy family man’
      • ‘He lived out the last quarter-century of his existence in the place he loved best, though still remembering the Italy, Egypt and India of his youth.’
      • ‘I knew that the rest of my life would be lived out in group homes, or foster homes, or worse, staying at my grandmother's place.’
      • ‘He could have lived out his years proud to have served his country and regarded as a hero from America's last ‘good’ war.’
      • ‘I imagine it's a great relief to him to be living his life out on a remote Pacific island.’
      • ‘Galileo's sentence was to renounce his theory and to live out the rest of his days in a pleasant country house near Florence.’
      • ‘All of these men would have lived out their lives in impotent obscurity had their families remained in England.’
      • ‘Butler was given a house by one of his wealthy admirers up there, and lived out the last three or four years of his life in this kind of subdivision, at the end of a cul-de-sac.’
      • ‘That horse lived out his life in comfort in a warm barn with more straw and oats than he could use.’
      • ‘Down in Texas, at a shabby nursing home called Mud Creek Shady Rest, a fat wreck of a man is living out his final days.’
      • ‘We've always had itchy feet but I can see us living our days out in Turkey.’
  • live through

    • Survive (an unpleasant experience or period)

      ‘both men lived through the Depression’

Origin

Old English libban, lifian, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch leven and German leben, also to life and leave.

Pronunciation

live

/liv//lɪv/

Main definitions of live in US English:

: live1live2

live2

adjective

  • 1Not dead or inanimate; living.

    ‘live animals’
    ‘the number of live births and deaths’
    • ‘Is it better to be a live slave than a dead hero or heroine?’
    • ‘Nearby was a cage full of live rabbits and when questioned the teenagers could not provide a satisfactory answer as to how the animals came to be there.’
    • ‘Furthermore, is it ethically right for drug developers to use live subjects to test their developmental medicines?’
    • ‘Carnivorous animals will eat live insects and some will eat mice and rats.’
    • ‘Dried turtle meat, six live turtles and an undetermined number of explosives were recovered on the boat.’
    • ‘Some people buy live trees that are balled in burlap instead of a cut tree.’
    • ‘Vacuuming removes mite allergen from carpets but is inefficient at removing live mites.’
    • ‘Each year, Hong Kong imports 1.6 million live pigs from the mainland.’
    • ‘They can also locate small heat sources, such as a liferaft in the open sea, or a live body in an expanse of snowy hillside.’
    • ‘Unaffected countries have already banned imports of live birds and meat.’
    • ‘The veterinarians look at the live birds, checking for any that may be sick or injured.’
    • ‘Several diseases cause rings of dead grass with live green grass in the center.’
    • ‘The EU yesterday banned the import of live birds, poultry meat and feathers from Romania for at least six months.’
    • ‘Hundreds of children have been visiting Roves Farm near Swindon to take part in the nativity with a cast of live animals.’
    • ‘Three hundred people staged a rally at Dover yesterday over the export of live animals.’
    • ‘I will not have for a pet anything that requires being fed other live animals.’
    • ‘Any new ingredients in these products are tested on live animals.’
    • ‘All 18 who were infected in the 1997 outbreak had been in close contact with live animals in markets or on farms.’
    • ‘For example, a dead tree is not an eyesore, it's a home - there's more life in a dead tree than a live tree.’
    • ‘The best way to prevent head lice spreading is to check your whole family's scalps regularly and treat them as soon as live lice are found.’
    living, alive, having life, breathing
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a vaccine) containing viruses or bacteria that are living but of a mild or attenuated strain.
      • ‘An inactivated polio vaccine will replace live oral polio vaccines for all ages.’
      • ‘The six victims inoculated with the attenuated live virus vaccine developed symptoms similar to those of yellow fever.’
      • ‘If he or she has recently received another live vaccine, you should delay vaccination for at least three weeks.’
      • ‘Is this because it was simply oral, or was it because it was a live vaccine?’
      • ‘The particular make up of the MMR live vaccine means that many more children are being affected.’
      • ‘A live, attenuated influenza virus vaccine is nearing approval in the United States.’
      • ‘A live weakened virus vaccine is effective in preventing some of these diseases.’
      • ‘Safety issues with the live flavivirus vaccines need to be recognised and addressed.’
      • ‘To avoid human infection, farmers should wear latex gloves when handling both infected animals and the live vaccine.’
      • ‘These children show few adverse reactions to routine vaccinations, including live vaccines.’
    2. 1.2 (of yogurt) containing the living microorganisms by which it is formed.
      • ‘The labeling is voluntary, so a container of yogurt could have live cultures but not show the seal.’
      • ‘A plain live yoghurt with some added fresh fruit would be a better option.’
  • 2Relating to a musical performance given in concert, not on a recording.

    ‘there is traditional live music played most nights’
    ‘a live album’
    • ‘In addition to the live music, local DJs will also be performing.’
    • ‘In 1910, a bandstand was erected for the then popular live brass band music.’
    • ‘Most of the evening performances were a blend of live music and spoken word performances.’
    • ‘There was also a live concert of indigenous music and a lavish banquet.’
    • ‘Dinner will be served at 6pm and the evening can be spent listening to live traditional music in the village.’
    • ‘The performance features six exceptional dancers with live music by the UK's leading tango ensemble.’
    • ‘These musicians will perform a live holiday music show from a boxcar stage.’
    • ‘So many people in the club seemed oblivious to the fact that there was actually live music being played.’
    • ‘The performance features two live musicians and five performers who do the work of about 10.’
    • ‘However, I suspect that this band really come into their own with live performance.’
    • ‘Added to that, his company is passionate about the relationship between live music and dance in performance.’
    • ‘Although she has a preference for live music and performance Caroline has a very successful recording career on the Scorpus label.’
    • ‘A live musical performance demands our attention and alters our perceptions of time and space.’
    • ‘We were treated to live vocals from a soprano, baritone, alto and tenor.’
    • ‘The first live music on the stage was a band called the Duets, a lady and gent who had many fans around the square to hear their songs.’
    • ‘As a former musician myself, I love live music and especially jazz.’
    • ‘Though it took many years to establish the technique of sound on film, live music accompanied public performances.’
    • ‘As music teachers, we also must promote and encourage attendance at live performances.’
    • ‘You can dance the night away or just relax and enjoy the live music performed by the superb nine-piece Art Lester Band.’
    • ‘Do you attach any importance to what the press say about your music and your live performances?’
    1. 2.1 (of a broadcast) transmitted at the time of occurrence, not from a recording.
      ‘live coverage of the match’
      • ‘Traditional broadcasters, with a live webcast of their output, were joined by new internet based stations.’
      • ‘Those who couldn't squeeze into the hall could hear the lecture blasted across the campus on speakers, or go home and view the live webcast.’
      • ‘Now, we have the regular live telecasts of even Italian and Spanish league football.’
      • ‘Crowded round a radio listening to the live broadcast from Parliament, we all felt that a change was going to come, something old was dying.’
      • ‘As I removed my earpiece after a live broadcast on Tuesday, a man who'd been listening approached me.’
      • ‘The main argument being used against live telecasts is that they will slash attendances on cold winter nights.’
      • ‘The performer had been asked to tone his act down after rehearsal but had ignored this request during the live broadcast.’
      • ‘Hundreds more were watching by live webcast and listening in by audio conference.’
      • ‘This will be the first occasion on which a live broadcast will be made in Parliament.’
      • ‘But every effort is made, says Ian, to create the illusion that the broadcasts are live.’
      • ‘It may not be very long before we will be able to watch anything via live webcast, though likely for a price.’
      • ‘My friends are soccer fanatics but they seemed to enjoy the live telecast, once I had explained the rules.’
      • ‘This tape is a collection of 10 skits from the original live broadcasts of the show.’
      • ‘This was an historic event, the second ever live telecast out of Ireland.’
      • ‘Right after that the government pulled the plug on further live broadcasts from the cathedral.’
      • ‘Wearing a green coat and matching headscarf, she made two live broadcasts from just outside the city.’
      • ‘It costs money to go to a football match, why not to watch a live broadcast?’
      • ‘Bob agreed that he and Jim would take part in a live broadcast for Country Magazine.’
      • ‘It presents not only sound but also pictures, and the news can be transmitted instantly in live coverage.’
      • ‘As yet there's no title, but the band previewed one song, Knives Out, in a live webcast in December.’
      in the flesh, personal, in person, actual
      View synonyms
  • 3(of a wire or device) connected to a source of electric current.

    • ‘The cable was certainly live when we got there, but it may have been tripped further down the line.’
    • ‘Would the wires still be live once they weren't connected up to the box?’
    • ‘He died as a live electric wire fell down into river.’
    • ‘The gang are expert at disabling alarms and have often cut through live junction boxes to do so.’
    • ‘One accident involving a live electrical wire in his path while he was cutting grass nearly killed him.’
    • ‘The impact of the crash snapped the pole in two, with the upper half landing on his roof, leaving live cables dangling next to his property.’
    • ‘The tree brought down electrical and BT lines, with a live cable setting the tree alight.’
    • ‘It is the second time the workman has stared death in the face after striking a live cable with a shovel in Bradford on Avon eight years ago.’
    • ‘Remember which wire is live and have your helper turn the power back off, checking with the tester to be sure.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, Antony, the thinker, had cleverly skewered a piece of Cheddar onto the end of a bare live electrical wire.’
    • ‘The base housed the live electrical wires.’
    • ‘The crews also secured live electricity cables as falling trees and branches brought down overhead wires.’
    electrified, charged, powered, connected, active, switched on
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 Of, containing, or using undetonated explosive.
      ‘live ammunition’
      • ‘On Friday, police said they found two backpacks containing live bombs that had not exploded.’
      • ‘The missile was successfully tested on November 30 last year while carrying a live warhead.’
      • ‘A sports day at a school turned tragic when a starter's pistol turned out to have a live bullet in it.’
      • ‘A live bomb travelled more than 20 miles through south Essex in the rush-hour before being discovered.’
      • ‘I would not have been surprised if she had used it with live ammo and despatched the squabbling members of her family.’
      • ‘A loaded Smith and Wesson revolver and four live rounds of ammunition were found hidden in a box under a bed.’
      • ‘A 9mm pistol containing eight live bullets was discovered hidden under a pile of clothes in a different wardrobe.’
      • ‘She was thrown down a mineshaft, and as she lay broken at the bottom a live grenade was tossed down on her.’
      • ‘The stove was located two rooms away from the ammunition room, which had plenty of live ammo.’
      • ‘People came into our house to shelter and told us that the army was shooting live rounds.’
      • ‘A Royal Navy bomb disposal team arrived this morning and confirmed the object was a live mortar bomb.’
      • ‘By this time I was shaking since I had no live bullets in my gun and not knowing what was going on.’
      • ‘How many other divers have encountered live munitions while pursuing their sport.’
      • ‘In the middle of the night we were ordered to assemble in full battle order with live ammo.’
      • ‘Nothing replaces live training with live ammunition with the whole unit in the field.’
      • ‘It normally fired airgun pellets and the modification turned it into a prohibited weapon as live bullets could be fired from it.’
      • ‘These live bombs leak contaminants and pose an explosive threat to fishers and divers.’
      • ‘When the revolver was examined it was discovered that all but two of the gun's chambers contained live bullets.’
      • ‘Not only is this stretch of land corrugated and unmarked, it is also a live minefield.’
      • ‘He then set up two devices, each comprising a sawn-off shotgun barrel and live ammunition.’
      unexploded, explosive, explodable, active
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2 (of coals) burning or glowing.
      • ‘He would bank the furnace fires and close the draft to insure live coals the next morning.’
      • ‘The batter is poured into a banana-leaf-lined container and baked in a clay oven on live coals.’
      • ‘Nobody wished to retain money, everybody dropped it like a live coal.’
      • ‘A live coal from the altar has touched his lips, and they are purified.’
      • ‘The rice wine felt like live coal slipping down my throat.’
      hot, glowing, red hot, aglow, smouldering
      View synonyms
    3. 3.3 (of a match) unused.
      • ‘The joss stick had been stuck in a box of live matches.’
      • ‘One Mum who was playing with live matches with her toddler daughter!’
    4. 3.4 (of a wheel or axle in machinery) moving or imparting motion.
      • ‘Most lay the blame for its lack of handling on the live rear axle.’
      • ‘Well it's American and it's got a live axle so it's bound to be no good, right?’
    5. 3.5 (of a ball in a game) in play, especially in contrast to being foul or out of bounds.
      • ‘Now for the coup de grace: a pair of Offaly hands would wrap themselves around the next live ball.’
      • ‘Burress then picks up the ball and drops it again, and the Falcons proceed to pick up what should be a live ball.’
      • ‘A player may leave the playing area to play a live ball.’
      • ‘The ball becomes live when it leaves the referee's or umpire's hands on a jump ball.’
      • ‘The ball was still live and the pitcher threw it out of play.’
  • 4(of a question or subject) of current or continuing interest and importance.

    ‘the future organization of Europe has become a live issue’
    • ‘None-the-less, concern to give local communities effective control over policing remains a live issue.’
    • ‘Here is a chance at least for the younger generation to make known its views on this live subject.’
    • ‘This is a particularly live issue in changes of job duties, the contractual scope of which is vital to decisions on redundancy payments.’
    • ‘The issue has been a live issue for a number of years now.’
    • ‘As to the second point, is there a live question of discretion in this application?’
    • ‘That led to the preliminary question, and therefore, your Honour, it remains a live question.’
    • ‘Obesity has become a politically live issue in recent years.’
    • ‘There is a question of trust and it is a live issue and we have to deal with it.’
    • ‘The question has been a live one long before it entered the deep entrails of the European Union's legislative process.’
    • ‘The place of faith within politics looks likely to remain a live issue as the case for Turkish EU membership is made.’
    • ‘So it was a live issue and a real issue for the jury to consider.’
    • ‘That, I submit, was a live issue for the jury when considering this appellant's case.’
    • ‘That is a live question because of the proposed abolition of the Compensation Court of New South Wales.’
    • ‘Whether or not there was a default in payment of rent for these premises remains a live issue.’
    • ‘Now, they must have been live issues, because we find more than traces of them.’
    • ‘Food safety and pollution are very live issues.’
    • ‘Mr O'Dwyer, however, emphasised the issue was still live and would have to be dealt with.’
    • ‘So the question of the process of reasoning that a trial judge is supposed to go through also became a very live question.’
    • ‘They knew that Vietnam is still a live issue among a certain generation.’
    • ‘The movement of families from older estates to the new ones is also a very live issue and that is happening on a regular basis.’
    topical, current, of current interest, contemporary
    View synonyms

adverb

  • As or at an actual event or performance.

    ‘the match will be televised live’
    • ‘This man is a singer of tremendous ability and well worth hearing live.’
    • ‘The entire BBC Local Radio network in England will broadcast the funeral live.’
    • ‘The race will be televised live around the world.’
    • ‘Each programme from the daytime schedule is broadcasting live from a different venue throughout the day.’
    • ‘We just can't wait to be back on-stage performing live and especially at home in Ireland.’
    • ‘Millions more watched the event live on TV and listened to the national radio.’
    • ‘What do you prefer - playing live or recording spectacular music in the solitude of a recording studio?’
    • ‘Kian described it as the moment the band has all been waiting for, getting up on stage and performing live.’
    • ‘Glasgow's Proms in the Park will be broadcast live, in its entirety on BBC Radio Scotland.’
    • ‘John will also report live from the major events in the political calendar.’
    • ‘The songs have been recorded live in studios and computers have not been used to arrange the music.’
    • ‘Thousands will relish the chance to see them perform together live on stage at Buckingham Palace.’
    • ‘You also allowed it to be broadcast live on television and on radio here.’
    • ‘Charlie sent a personal message and a signed photograph to brave Jasmine and free tickets have been arranged for her to see the band play live.’
    • ‘I also remember watching his resignation speech live, another great performance.’
    • ‘If enacted, either bill could prevent you from hearing your favorite band or DJ live.’
    • ‘There's something about seeing sport live that makes a difference.’
    • ‘The game will be screened live on Sky TV with a 6.05 pm kick off.’
    • ‘Even though I'd only written my first song then, I'd been playing live for years.’
    • ‘Their midday encounter was being shown live on the big screen, just behind the court.’

Phrases

  • go live

    • (of a system) become operational.

      • ‘Six months later, in June 2001, our new Web site went live.’
      • ‘After the system has gone live, the consultants continue to train the users while they're doing their jobs.’
      • ‘In almost every case, the client would be better off waiting until the application goes live before testing, rather than testing an incomplete ensemble of code and components.’
      • ‘The University of Liverpool today unveiled a new supercomputer cluster which is expected to be one of the World's 100 most powerful systems when it goes live next month.’
      • ‘The new Cambridge Journals Online system went live in October 2000.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: shortening of alive.

Pronunciation

live

/laɪv//līv/