Definition of liturgy in US English:

liturgy

noun

  • 1A form or formulary according to which public religious worship, especially Christian worship, is conducted.

    • ‘From then on, Coptic was used only in Christian liturgy.’
    • ‘John takes this opportunity to provide his reader with something equally important to Eucharistic liturgy.’
    • ‘In reality, there has always been growth and development in Orthodox liturgy.’
    • ‘I have tried in this essay to discern what makes for change and continuity in Christian liturgy today.’
    • ‘A native religion, a combination of African rituals and Christian liturgy, has formed on Saint Vincent.’
    ritual, worship, service, ceremony, rite, observance, celebration, ordinance, office, sacrament, solemnity, ceremonial
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    1. 1.1 A religious service conducted according to a liturgy.
      • ‘The Pope said Catholic priests were forbidden to celebrate Eucharistic liturgies with Protestant ministers.’
      • ‘We were driven to a village three hours away from our centre where we were presented as guests at a Sunday liturgy, an incredibly lively and moving event.’
      • ‘Sunday liturgies will include prayers and reflections on the theme of poverty.’
      • ‘The Vigil of Easter liturgy held yearly on Holy Saturday in my former campus congregation always is a special occasion.’
      • ‘Some Seekers create innovative liturgies that will involve children in their Sunday service.’
      • ‘As we know, they had maintained the practice of ordaining women deacons during the Eucharistic liturgy.’
      • ‘They are all integral parts of church interiors and of the Orthodox liturgy and private devotion.’
      • ‘Unlike the standard Catholic liturgy, no two services have been alike.’
      • ‘Finally, it climaxes in the the Marriage Supper of the Lamb (the liturgy of the Eucharist).’
      • ‘The first children's liturgy will take place in the vigil mass of November 15.’
      • ‘The Catholic Mass, Protestant services, and Jewish liturgies adhere to formats that are always followed.’
      • ‘The final chapter summarizes and integrates the previous chapters with a study of Genesis that examines themes and suggests a brief liturgy as a conclusion to the study.’
      • ‘When sacramental participation had ceased to be the norm, people needed a reason for attending the liturgy.’
      • ‘A year earlier, Communion had been denied to two women present at a conciliar liturgy, which attracted much attention in the press.’
      • ‘Kindly inform any person residing outside the parish who might wish to attend this special liturgy.’
      • ‘Driven by hysterical choirs and crashing percussion, the Latin liturgy is indeed rather scary.’
      • ‘The original hearers of the work were, after all, the congregation present at a solemn liturgy, not the audience at a concert.’
      • ‘Soloists, organists and all musicians are reminded that their primary role is one of service to the liturgy.’
      • ‘So the liturgy of the word was replaced by Stations of the Cross!’
      • ‘After all, is that not the intention of the liturgy of the word?’
      ceremony, ritual, rite, observance, ordinance
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 The Eucharistic service of the Eastern Orthodox Church (also called the Divine Liturgy).
      • ‘By contrast, in the Orthodox Liturgy, there is an air of reverence, as well as an atmosphere of informality.’
      • ‘Why not join in as a helper at the " Sunday Liturgy".’
      • ‘I cooked alone, ate alone, and walked alone four times a day up the steep hill to the monastery to participate in the Eucharist and the Liturgy of the Hours.’
      • ‘Even now, in our celebration of the Mass, the Liturgy of the Word comes before the Liturgy of the Eucharist.’
      • ‘The Catholic Mass is composed of the Liturgy of the Word and the Liturgy of the Eucharist, but when Catholics speak of ‘going to Mass’ it is chiefly the second they have in mind.’
  • 2(in ancient Greece) a public office or duty performed voluntarily by a rich Athenian.

    • ‘Replacement funds were presumably provided by the Athenian élite through liturgies, impositions of property and ‘semi-voluntary’ subscriptions.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: via French or late Latin from Greek leitourgia ‘public service, worship of the gods’, from leitourgos ‘minister’, from lēitos ‘public’ + -ergos ‘working’.

Pronunciation

liturgy

/ˈlɪdərdʒi//ˈlidərjē/