Definition of little theater in US English:

little theater

noun

  • A small independent theater used for experimental or avant-garde drama, or for noncommercial community productions.

    • ‘In actual fact, they are showrooms or little theatres.’
    • ‘I miss being able to go the little theatres and watch an independent film.’
    • ‘A melange of funny, straight drama, television, movies, a little theater here and there wouldn't hurt.’
    • ‘The fringe started in 1947 when eight little theatre groups realised that, if they turned up in Edinburgh while the official festival was on, there would be audiences and media and a chance to grab a bit of both.’
    • ‘Every one of these headliners began in ‘Small Time ‘- little theaters where they made maybe $15 a week while they polished their dance steps and songs or tried out new jokes.’
    • ‘Actually, he told her the day they met at a tryout for a little theater production, ‘you don't believe this, but some day I'm going to marry you.’’
    • ‘The little theatre on the lower level of the Jubilee Auditorium will close when the building undergoes renovations next year and it won't be reopened.’
    • ‘At the moment I'm involved with trying to get together and build a new theatre, a little theatre in our town of Montville, which will be a place of excellence, and a place where culture can live in the mountains.’
    • ‘I was doing a writing weekend in little theatre in Prosperus.’
    • ‘They also championed development of an African American little theater movement.’
    • ‘She added that from her previous background in little theaters, she knew how important freedom was to a young heart.’
    • ‘Every big northern city has its own Hampstead - a professional, middle-class enclave with smart restaurants, little theatres and million-pound houses in what were until recently ordinary Victorian streets.’
    • ‘But we went ahead anyway and took these shops and turned them into little theatres.’