Definition of lippy in English:

lippy

adjective

informal
  • 1Insolent; impertinent.

    • ‘Pete was a lippy Scouser taken on when we were desperate and/or temporarily insane.’
    • ‘Her coquettish verve and her lippy song material will make the gals share a laugh and leave the ducktail set absolutely spellbound.’
    • ‘She's lippy and rude, and she's obsessed with breaking all my rules.’
    • ‘As well, since I noticed in Grade 5 that almost every lippy woman in literature is eventually clotheslined by fate, I wasn't too surprised when the wife in this play was struck by terminal cancer.’
    • ‘After the caning they took in the first two Tests, England were badly in need of a lippy bowler with plenty of menace and Kirby would have fitted the bill.’
    • ‘In a provincial war office, a young woman, Eve, placidly attacks her work (she is a coder), her days enlivened by the gossip of her female colleagues and the joshing of the Big Bad Wolves, a couple of lippy sergeants.’
    • ‘Yet there is another Rooney, who is lippy and arrogant, and who can't seem to keep a lid on his temper.’
    • ‘It's not happening for the lippy Welshman at all tonight.’
    • ‘When Francesca's dad advises her that the only way to deal with a lippy classmate is to ‘give her a slap’, the obedient daughter obliges.’
    • ‘Those not directly engaged by his tricks and nudges and lippy asides can enjoy a master of the midfield mind games, a proven winner in the wind-up wars.’
    • ‘Culkin grounds the movie in Igby, a lippy punk with a mean streak who you can't help but like because, well, he tells it like it is.’
    • ‘Let's take her words as proof that there's a creative itch hidden somewhere, anxious to pester her back into the lippy limelight in which she glowed in the first place.’
    • ‘The lippy critic, who constantly tips Wanderers to be relegated from the Premiership, accepted the charity challenge to shave off his trademark moustache if Sam Allardyce's team survive the drop.’
    • ‘Bolton is a town with a great history and a lot going for it, but we need to be known for more than the Industrial Revolution and a few lippy television presenters.’
    • ‘They're getting really lippy these days, aren't they?’
    • ‘The lippy critic was given a ‘put up or shut up ultimatum’ by four fans who appeared on BBC 1's Football Focus earlier in the season.’
    • ‘Besides if people get lippy you can always mention that it is a ‘radical adaptation’.’
    • ‘If you fancy a duel of words with a lippy French barman while he mixes you something long and cool, then this is the place to unsheathe your rapier wit.’
    • ‘They have gone from being lippy underdogs to tubby overlords in less than a decade and are now part of the establishment to which they once posed a potent challenge.’
    • ‘They'd rather get second-hand info about the finances than have to talk to the lippy accountant.’
    rude, bad-mannered, ill-mannered, unmannerly, discourteous, uncivil, disrespectful, inconsiderate, boorish, churlish, ill-bred, ungentlemanly, unladylike, ungracious, ungallant
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  • 2Having prominent lips.

Pronunciation:

lippy

/ˈlipē/