Definition of limoncello in English:

limoncello

noun

  • A lemon-flavored Italian liqueur.

    • ‘In sheer desperation I made a cocktail using equal amounts of tequila and limoncello, with just a splash of fresh lemon juice.’
    • ‘This has the appeal of limoncello: an early sweetness soon cloys.’
    • ‘After another week, the limoncello was ready for chilling and sipping.’
    • ‘It had an interesting rummy-lemon flavor, but definitely was NOT limoncello.’
    • ‘And don't leave without splitting a piece of the limoncello cake.’
    • ‘I increased the limoncello a tad, and tried again.’
    • ‘Skip the too-sturdy, not-creamy-enough limoncello cheesecake.’
    • ‘The place is justly famed for its antipasti and the final limoncello; you might want to skip straight from one to the other.’
    • ‘For example he said the limoncello had "flavours that jangle like a car crash; all at once it's sickly sweet, overtly alcoholic, slippery, salty and bitter."’
    • ‘He has served a tweaked version of his family's limoncello recipe for years in his restaurants.’
    • ‘Pack them into the bottom of a large china or glass bowl then pour over the white wine and limoncello.’
    • ‘My second limoncello experience, in fact, was sampling the house variety at a bar and trattoria in Capalbio, Italy.’
    • ‘I should have known a little limoncello packs quite a wallop.’
    • ‘Many Italian families, as well as restaurants in Italy, have their own limoncello recipe that's been handed down for generations.’
    • ‘In a bowl, combine limoncello and simple syrup, dip ladyfingers into limoncello syrup; strain and reserve remaining limoncello syrup.’
    • ‘How better to end than by tucking into ice-cream that we really didn't have room for and ordering glasses of limoncello when we were already quite tipsy enough.’
    • ‘After sipping a tiny glass of limoncello while sitting around with old and new friends after a fine home-cooked meal, I was unable to count.’
    • ‘It's so vermouthy, I'd treat it like a vermouth, maybe mix it with limoncello and ginger beer.’
    • ‘We move on to the liqueurs; at least I do, hesitating momentarily over the grappa (we have a painful history) before opting for a safer limoncello.’
    • ‘Limoncello is very pretty but can knock you on your seat.’

Origin

Italian, from limone lemon + the diminutive suffix -cello.

Pronunciation:

limoncello

/ˌlimənˈCHelō/