Definition of like a house on fire (or afire) in US English:

like a house on fire (or afire)

phrase

informal
  • 1Vigorously; furiously.

    • ‘The book starts off like a house on fire.’
    • ‘For that to happen the Boks will need to start like a house on fire.’
    • ‘Vic Rangers set off like a house on fire and really took the game to Albion in the first ten minutes.’
    • ‘Bucks came back like a house on fire in the second half with dribbling wizard Clement Mazibuko doing wonders with the ball.’
    • ‘‘We set off like a house on fire, then allowed them to claw their way back to within two points,’ he said.’
    • ‘Rovers opened like a house on fire, but for all the speed and accuracy they showed, they could not find a breach in the Blues' defence.’
    • ‘They started the game like a house on fire, and star striker Siyabonga Nomvete almost scored in the third minute after connecting a pass from Bennet Mnguni, but the Congolese goalkeeper was alert.’
    1. 1.1 Excellently.
      ‘Ben and my aunt got along like a house on fire’
      • ‘They have started the season like a house on fire and are averaging six goals each game during a run of seven consecutive victories.’
      • ‘Leigh started like a house on fire against a big physical side, with Parr, Browning and Ranson working well as a unit and Lloyd, Thorpe, Peet and Wilkinson running well.’
      • ‘England's bizarre match against Italy a week ago, when Clive Woodward's men started like a house on fire and then stuttered almost to a standstill, did offer some positive pointers for Scotland.’
      • ‘Bury opened up like a house on fire and the contest was well over when they led 22-0 in the opening quarter.’
      • ‘Naturally, I am expecting to get along with her like a house on fire.’
      • ‘However, it was the 23-year-old Bingham who started like a house on fire and he won all four frames before the interval, helped by breaks of 51, 78, 70 and 95.’
      • ‘He seemed to be getting on with Lara like a house on fire, but from what he could tell she wasn't really into dancing frivolously with him much.’
      • ‘I met her in January 2005, and we've gotten along like a house on fire.’
      • ‘We set off like a house on fire, our first set saw us force a goal line dropout putting them under real pressure and we scored.’
      • ‘The Pirates brought in a whole host of new signings in the summer and started off like a house on fire under new manager Ian Atkins.’
      get on well, get on, get along, be on good terms, be friends, be friendly, be compatible, relate well to each other, feel a rapport, see eye to eye, take to each other, warm to each other, find things in common
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