Main definitions of lighter in English

: lighter1lighter2

lighter1

noun

  • A device that produces a small flame, typically used to light cigarettes.

    • ‘They made a good search of the place and made off with the till, fruit machine, cash plus cigarettes, cigars and lighters.’
    • ‘Get rid all of everything that reminds you of smoking, including ashtrays, cigarettes and lighters.’
    • ‘In some cases, building occupants used candles and cigarette lighters as light sources.’
    • ‘On that day, throw away all your cigarettes, lighters and ashtrays.’
    • ‘Besides the various tobacco products, all sorts of implements from tobacco pipes, lighters and ashtray to tobacco cases and machines can be found in this diverse and impressive collection.’
    • ‘Fire investigators, who found two cigarette lighters and matches in Alistair's bedroom, believe he probably set fire to clothing and the flames soon spread to bedding and bunk beds.’
    • ‘Ten cigarette lighters, fitted with transmitter similar to the ones strapped to scientifically-interesting wildlife, were dropped off around Limerick and their journeys traced.’
    • ‘At first he was completely against the device, which is powered by the car battery and plugs into the cigarette lighter.’
    • ‘Open flames, cigarettes, matches, lighters, pilot lights, or electric sparks can cause the chemicals in the paint strippers to suddenly catch fire.’
    • ‘He said: ‘The most likely cause would have been playing with cigarette lighters or matches.’’
    • ‘It adorns tacky gold cigarette lighters and sets of imitation pearl earrings found in inflight duty free catalogues.’
    • ‘He found two discarded syringes, used lighters and cigarette papers at the foot of a tree near seats at the reservoir.’
    • ‘All matches, lighters, cigarettes, pipes and cigars are potentially dangerous.’
    • ‘A muffled wind chime harmonized with the occasional car engine, whose purrs suggested heated seats and warm fans and glowing cigarette lighters.’
    • ‘Typically, shorts in electrical lights or open flames from candles, lighters, or matches start tree fires.’
    • ‘Did you ever wonder why tweezers were confiscated at security checkpoints, but matches and cigarette lighters - actual combustible materials - were not?’
    • ‘It is believed a flame from a cigarette lighter ignited oxygen at the man's bedside.’
    • ‘Matches, cigarette lighters, or magnesium fire starters beat the heck out of rubbing two sticks together when the wind is blowing hard and cold and your fingers are stiff and blue.’
    • ‘Plastic toys, cigarette lighters, and derelict fishing gear smother the coral reefs and litter the island shores.’
    • ‘Then gently warm the metal sleeve with a small flame from a cigarette lighter and pull the ring off using a pair of pliers.’
    match, flame, spark, source of fire
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

lighter

/ˈlīdər/

Main definitions of lighter in English

: lighter1lighter2

lighter2

noun

  • A flat-bottomed barge or other unpowered boat used to transfer cargo to and from ships in harbor.

    • ‘Boats of various shapes and sizes were built, yachts, smaller sailing craft, yawls, lighters for transporting sand and gravel, punts, racing gigs and even speedboats in the late 1930's.’
    • ‘Such lighters, usually flat-bottomed barges, were used in lightening or loading and unloading vessels that could not be wharfed, or where harbour facilities were underdeveloped or too small.’
    • ‘Within an hour, grubby tugs pushing heavily laden lighters are battling upstream towards banks lined with the darkest, most satanic-looking towns I'd ever seen.’
    • ‘The time taken to load and unload ships would be reduced, since the goods would no longer have to be taken ashore by lighters.’
    • ‘In the busiest ports, such as London or Newcastle upon Tyne, where larger vessels were unable to tie up at the quay, smaller lighters were used as intermediaries to carry goods from ship to shore.’
    • ‘They may have owned and operated lighters to transport goods from their private wharves to ships anchored in the bay of Smyrna and vice versa.’
    • ‘70 For instance, a merchant might want to embark goods outside his warehouse but there might be insufficient depth of water for the ship to moor alongside; lighters would then have to be used.’
    • ‘One firm sent its lighters, the London County Council dispatched its hopper barges, and the Port of London nine of its tugs which towed Thames sailing barges behind them.’
    • ‘They provide an interface between strategic sealift ships and lighters, and between the lighters and the beach or underdeveloped ports.’
    • ‘Ships had to discharge their cargoes at congested anchorages either into horse drawn lighters or onto packhorses for the journey to the industrial centre.’
    • ‘79 Even given that ships could and would use the quay and harbour, why should it cost more than carrying goods ashore in lighters?’
    • ‘Larger vessels had to anchor offshore and have cargoes and passengers shipped via lighters to and from land.’
    • ‘He saw one of the dockyard's lighters making its way across the water.’
    • ‘Given that the vessel had too deep a draft to enter the port, the Charterers could of course have required the vessel to discharge into lighters.’
    • ‘If the Kiperousa is pulled free it will be towed to Algoa Bay where divers will work on patching the ship up before bringing it into harbour to unload its logs using lighters plying between the ship and the port.’
    • ‘It might also have the effect of keeping the passage clearer by the more frequent stirring and movement of powerful steamers towing flotillas of keels and lighters.’
    • ‘In watercraft delivery, cases of MREs are loaded onto lighters, flat-bottomed boats, or barges and transported from port to port.’
    • ‘On the Gallipoli peninsula, seaborne landings were made in 1915, despite the fact that no specially designed craft were available, troops transferring from seagoing vessels to lighters to be ferried ashore.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Transport (goods) in a lighter.

    ‘they lightered their cargo ashore’

Origin

Late Middle English: from light (in the sense unload), or from Middle Low German luchter.

Pronunciation:

lighter

/ˈlīdər/