Definition of lifetime in English:

lifetime

noun

  • 1The duration of a person's life.

    ‘a reward for a lifetime's work’
    • ‘She gave a lifetime of service to the nursing profession and her community.’
    • ‘The 2004 data also show that lifetime inhalant use for eighth graders increased significantly.’
    • ‘The man looked at me, the second seeming to last a whole lifetime.’
    • ‘If not, he's faced with undoing a lifetime's worth of assumptions.’
    • ‘Still we manage to spend whole lifetimes together based on such understandings.’
    • ‘Our wars have taken from us the men and women we honor today and every hour of the lifetimes they had hoped to live.’
    • ‘He has given a lifetime of service to Ireland, and made huge sacrifices.’
    • ‘How can they be swimming lifetime bests so late in the game?’
    • ‘Although this may seem steep, you are benefiting from a lifetime of experience.’
    • ‘They destroyed a lifetime's work and thousands of pounds worth of gardening equipment.’
    • ‘And he said he was thrilled to be nominated for the lifetime achievement award.’
    • ‘Detention without any charges and without any court review can last an entire lifetime.’
    • ‘Only in this case, the midlife crisis lasted the entire lifetime, not just in the middle.’
    • ‘Representing such a lifetime's work on a single disc is a near impossible task.’
    • ‘Most medieval people lived out their short lifetimes within a radius of fifty miles of their birthplace.’
    • ‘But, in imposing the lifetime ban, the chairman of the bench said the measure was necessary to protect other animals.’
    • ‘Both authors combine a lifetime of clinical experience with a keen interest in research methodology.’
    • ‘Facing greater competition, employers have eliminated lifetime employment guarantees to managers and professionals and reduced salaries.’
    • ‘Yet they appreciate that each has had a lifetime's worth of rich experiences while they were apart.’
    • ‘Some healthcare providers indicate that they will archive medical records for a person's lifetime plus seven years.’
    lifespan, life, days, duration of life, allotted span, course of life, time on earth, existence, one's time, one's career, one's threescore years and ten, this mortal coil
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The duration of a thing's existence or usefulness.
      ‘a plan to extend the lifetime of satellites’
      • ‘The potential for improved radiation resistance of thin-film solar cells relative to single-crystal cells could extend the mission lifetimes substantially.’
      • ‘The novelty-averse rats commonly lived about 600 days, compared with 700-day lifetimes for the bolder rats.’
      • ‘His point, a valid one, is that clinical trials have tended to get longer, larger, and more expensive, while patent lifetimes aren't changing.’
      • ‘We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence lifetimes of barley leaves preheated to selected temperatures corresponding to important points in the FTC.’
      • ‘Nuclear is megalithic in its production capacity and timescales - reactor commissioning can take ten years or more, with reactor lifetimes of decades followed by expensive decommissioning.’
      • ‘An individual base pair has an average lifetime in the range of 10 seconds.’
      • ‘In the above example, the data compromised at least two populations of dwell-times with the mean lifetimes separated by about an order of magnitude.’
      • ‘Pitting allows atomic oxygen, present in low Earth orbits, to react with an exposed surface, causing corrosion and reducing the serviceable lifetimes of satellites.’
      • ‘This cemented its leadership in the industry for six years - several lifetimes in the world of high tech - and in the process made personal computers a reality for the home user.’
      • ‘Binding of phenol to one site extends the lifetime of the other two in the trimer.’
      • ‘As before, these costs are for 30-year project lifetimes discounted at a 4% real interest rate.’
      • ‘Then, they make sure those roofs get the attention they deserve to extend their useful lifetimes.’
      • ‘Bond lifetimes were measured directly, and rupture force calculated from the trap stiffness.’
      • ‘Also, among birds their migration route is a round-trip one, which they make more than once in their lifetimes, while for the monarch it is strictly a one-way trip for each butterfly.’
      • ‘But in the new economy, 10 years is like 10 lifetimes.’
      • ‘Today, at the start of the 21st century, human lifetimes are being extended while the lifetimes of new technologies are becoming shorter and shorter.’
      • ‘Fig. 9 shows the average hydrogen bond lifetimes of each amino acid in the sampled peptides.’
      • ‘This is a good thing because it probably extends the expected lifetime of the drives significantly.’
      • ‘Now they're held by big corporates, and often extended beyond the lifetime of the product.’
      • ‘One would expect that a single tryptophan residue should have only one excited state lifetime.’
      duration, life, active life, existence, life expectancy, functioning period, period of effectiveness, period of efficacy, period of usefulness, period of validity
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2informal Used to express the view that a period is very long.
      ‘five weeks was a lifetime, and anything could have happened’
      • ‘It took a lifetime for the elevator doors to open on my floor, and it took another lifetime to walk to my apartment door.’
      all one's life, a very long time, an eternity
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • of a lifetime

    • (of a chance or experience) such as does not occur more than once in a person's life.

      ‘because of Frankie she had rejected the opportunity of a lifetime’
      • ‘It was an opportunity of a lifetime and I was really pleased to have the chance to meet him.’
      • ‘At once terrifying and thrilling, many would consider a parachute jump to be the experience of a lifetime.’
      • ‘Patrons will have the opportunity to win a holiday of a lifetime for two people in Cuba.’
      • ‘You will have the experience of a lifetime and we will make you and yours more than welcome on your return.’
      • ‘It is a dilemma which is denying promising competitors the chance of a lifetime, and has even divided families.’
      • ‘Add the famous French cheese and wine to the platter and one can experience the meal of a lifetime.’
      • ‘Two Mayo people had what can only be described as the most emotional experience of a lifetime.’
      • ‘Budding young thespians auditioned for the chance of a trip of a lifetime to Italy.’
      • ‘This is the chance of a lifetime and sentiment cannot get in the way.’
      • ‘I wanted to go on the adventure of a lifetime and remember this experience.’

Pronunciation

lifetime

/ˈlaɪfˌtaɪm//ˈlīfˌtīm/