Definition of legacy in English:

legacy

noun

  • 1An amount of money or property left to someone in a will.

    • ‘Partnerships will bring you wealth and success and you may inherit a legacy.’
    • ‘The minster has always been funded by generous gifts and legacies.’
    • ‘Funding comes from campaigns, bequests, legacies and the continuing generosity of Cantabrians.’
    • ‘Bad inheritance planning can mean your legacy is eaten up by probate taxes, solicitor's fees and charges.’
    • ‘However the opportunities to grant bequests, or to leave legacies and gifts are pre-empted.’
    • ‘Most charities would claim that around 30 per cent of their income comes from the legacies - gifts - left by people in their will.’
    • ‘Many of the large charities rely on legacies, which can cut inheritance tax bills.’
    • ‘The 8th shows gain from dowries, unexpected inheritances and legacies.’
    • ‘This would generate 4,000 per year, to which would be added other gifts and legacies.’
    • ‘Bentham tells the family that they are about to inherit a legacy from a relative.’
    • ‘Outline the division of your estate giving details of cash legacies to friends or charities, bequests of specific property.’
    • ‘They have income from legacies or property sales, and they will take in a lot from collections.’
    • ‘Friends chairman David Meal said the cots had been bought with money from legacies, donations, and a very successful collection in December at Tesco at Askham Bar.’
    • ‘From charity legacies to endowment shortfalls, John Husband answers your financial queries’
    bequest, inheritance, heritage, bequeathal, bestowal, benefaction, endowment, gift, patrimony, heirloom, settlement, birthright, provision
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    1. 1.1 A thing handed down by a predecessor.
      ‘the legacy of centuries of neglect’
      • ‘Paradoxically her legacy was to remove any parental role in the provision of contraception for young people.’
      • ‘The original was cool, but this one tries with unsuccessful results to live up to the legacy of its predecessor.’
      • ‘One of the major themes of the book is the ongoing legacy of colonialism.’
      • ‘I guess that he might have preferred more substantial legacies than these, but maybe they'll do just fine.’
      • ‘And their legacies continue to cause newcomers to pause before embarking down similar routes.’
      • ‘Many have commented on how the lasting divisions on the sub-continent are partly a legacy of British colonialism.’
      • ‘Groups in Scotland that have long campaigned to address the asbestos legacy have welcomed the legislation.’
      • ‘If chimps and humans are both violent, they are likely to share a genetic legacy for violence with this ancestor.’
      • ‘It is clear that the traits William has inherited from his mother are also reinforced from a legacy on his father's side too.’
      • ‘The legacies of Prohibition were an increased level of alcohol consumption and flourishing organised crime.’
      • ‘Cemetery managers, like parishes, have inherited an unenviable legacy from past generations.’
      • ‘One of the legacies of these practices is the impact on the property market in the target areas.’
      • ‘The real issue here is not public dental services, but flawed national health policy, and its legacy.’
      • ‘And at this stage of his career, Oscar is looking for more than money: he's got his eye on his legacy.’
      • ‘The war bestowed two valuable legacies on women.’
      • ‘The modern consensus view is to judge the legacies of empire, especially of the modern European empires, very harshly.’
      • ‘Nicholson created something extraordinary but the custodians of the club have not done justice to his legacy.’
      • ‘Some turned to alcohol or drugs to cope with their legacies of violence and shame.’
      • ‘All of those things are lasting legacies and testaments to the man's hockey career.’
      • ‘Its roots go back to colonial history and it is a legacy of European colonialism and modernity.’
      consequence, effect, outcome, upshot, spin-off, repercussion, aftermath, footprint, by-product, product, result
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adjective

Computing
  • Denoting software or hardware that has been superseded but is difficult to replace because of its wide use.

    • ‘This meant that legacy applications would not be supported if companies moved to updated versions.’
    • ‘Integration with legacy systems has been cited as a problem by over half of respondents.’
    • ‘None of these legacy ports are able to handle the high bandwidth peripherals of today.’
    • ‘Then new projects that could have gone with the legacy platform start going to the new one.’
    • ‘The legacy server may reside on a different machine and is the third tier in our architecture.’

Origin

Late Middle English (also denoting the function or office of a deputy, especially a papal legate): from Old French legacie, from medieval Latin legatia legateship from legatus person delegated (see legate).

Pronunciation:

legacy

/ˈleɡəsē/