Definition of lead-off in English:

lead-off

adjective

  • 1(of an action) beginning a series or a process.

    ‘the album's lead-off track’
    • ‘Take the lead-off track from their 2003 self-titled debut EP.’
    • ‘The rest of the album, while maybe not as instantly likable as the lead-off single, keeps things in a suitably summertime laidback groove.’
    • ‘I asked him how it felt to take the lead-off at Woodstock and he said, ‘Man, I was scared to death!’’
    • ‘The lead-off track finds Haggard sounding appropriately weary.’
    • ‘He asked me the inevitable lead-off question, ‘Excuse me, have you received a free gift yet, sir?’’
    • ‘Though the demands of the concept overwhelm several of the songs, when the two strike a balance, as they do on this lead-off track, the results are memorable.’
    • ‘Inside this new issue the editorial director's lead-off article offers a profound explanation.’
    • ‘The lead-off track begins as a shimmering, throbbing Moog orgy, through which a Spanish-sounding electric guitar bobs and weaves.’
    • ‘In the lead-off essay, she served up a heaping portion of sweet pabulum.’
    • ‘It's customary to begin the meat of a review with the lead-off track, but in this instance that's a secondary concern.’
    • ‘If you take tonight as the lead-off of the Republican Party in making its case, it did not make a very good case at all.’
    • ‘I'd forgotten 20th Century Man, the lead-off track from this under-rated 1971 album.’
    • ‘It's called ‘The First Amendment Project’ and it's a series of films about the lead-off clause in the Bill of Rights.’
    • ‘Maybe there would be a wacky video to go with the lead-off single, who knows?’
    1. 1.1Baseball
      Denoting the first batter in a lineup or of an inning.
      • ‘He's also the greatest lead-off man of all-time, and probably the third-greatest leftfielder in history behind Ted Williams and Barry Bonds.’
      • ‘In the '70s the idea of a lead-off man hitting 30 home runs was preposterous.’
      • ‘The largest determination of how many runs are likely to be scored in an inning is whether or not the lead-off man reaches base.’
      • ‘As has been well documented, the White Sox lead-off man has now hit two homers in the playoffs after failing to go deep during the regular season in more than 500 at-bats.’
      • ‘He strikes out the lead-off man, then walks the next three batters.’

Pronunciation:

lead-off

/ˈlēdäf/