Definition of layperson in English:



  • 1A nonordained member of a church.

    • ‘The curriculum sets up a false opposition between a literate (or Latinate) clergy and the illiterate laypeople.’
    • ‘If most laypeople of the thirteenth century were not directly familiar with Augustine's statement in the City of God that "works of mercy are performed for no other reason than so that we may be freed from misery and, thereby, be happy," certainly they were no strangers to the idea.’
    • ‘The decision followed calls from priests and Catholic laypeople for him to stand down over his handling of the scandal.’
    • ‘Most laypeople did not attend Mass aside from the major feasts.’
    • ‘The church, through its nuns, priests, and laypeople, positions itself in direct opposition to tyranny and oppression.’
    • ‘He informed her that it was not permissible that a layperson possess such an important relic.’
    • ‘In the central bay stands the altar at which laypeople attended Mass.’
    • ‘The layperson responsible for keeping things in ritual order in the synagogue points out two Russian seniors to Mark.’
    • ‘Textual and visual sources alike indicate that the passage of laypeople through the screen to participate in services in the choir was hardly a rarity.’
    unordained person, member of the congregation, parishioner
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    1. 1.1A person without professional or specialized knowledge in a particular subject.
      • ‘This is a time-honoured comedy, which, in layperson's terms, means old-fashioned.’
      • ‘When you talk to laypeople, what don't they understand about what bandwidth means and what it can became?’
      • ‘He observed that if a naturalist walks through a forest, they would see things that no layperson would see.’
      • ‘This book is a compromise of sorts: not quite scholarly, yet not quite accessible to the layperson.’
      • ‘The result is that he jumps to easy conclusions, something intelligent laypeople are not likely to trust.’
      • ‘She has an affinity for reduction prints, which, to the layperson, seem inconceivably complex.’
      • ‘It focusses on topics so remote from everyday concerns that, from a layperson's perspective, they can seem pointless.’
      • ‘This is an argument from the field of descriptive linguistics, made for a rhetorical audience of laypeople.’
      • ‘The 30-year-old company president says his aim was to make space-age technology not just available but acceptable to laypeople.’
      • ‘Savvy laypeople will see through these broad brush strokes, thus undermining the credibility of the experimental method.’
      • ‘To the layperson it's gobbledygook unless, firstly, you know your law, and, secondly, you know the business.’
      • ‘This is a fine introduction to network theorizing for any layperson interested in keeping up with new developments in science.’