Definition of laud in English:

laud

verb

[WITH OBJECT]formal
  • Praise (a person or their achievements) highly, especially in a public context.

    ‘the obituary lauded him as a great statesman and soldier’
    as adjective , with submodifier ‘her much lauded rendering of Lady Macbeth’
    • ‘I don't know much about this director, but I hear he is highly lauded in certain circles.’
    • ‘He had sort of a cult following him, admiring and lauding his every action.’
    • ‘I imagine he's out there drawing cartoons somewhere or painting paintings, but no one's beating his door down lauding him as the great artist that he is.’
    • ‘It may seem that I am justifying or lauding the attack.’
    • ‘In the long term, in paradise, but also in the short term, as others from church lauded me for my suffering.’
    • ‘Well those who protect this system of conservatism and corporatism love lauding us with such flowery titles.’
    • ‘If these people wished to laud him, they were welcome to it - he would simply sit and enjoy the rather wonderful irony.’
    • ‘The British public are notoriously fickle about their celebrities - bullying them one minute, lauding them the next.’
    • ‘He'd been a perfect gentleman, lauding me with compliments, calling when he said he would.’
    • ‘In the Commons, she was extravagantly lauded for her honesty, integrity, humanity.’
    • ‘What about the gifts in cash and kind reporters on the business pages are liable to receive for lauding a particular scrip or company?’
    • ‘Which is why both these films had critics lauding them’
    • ‘For this he was lauded by the international business press and Washington.’
    • ‘It deserves to be lauded and praised as much as it deserves to be scrutinized and picked apart.’
    • ‘We took them out and carefully replaced them where we found them and ended the matter with suitable speeches, lauding ourselves for our great achievement.’
    • ‘Now she is lauded as the beloved elder stateswoman of the tournament.’
    • ‘Their achievements will be lauded in the hills around Killawalla for many years.’
    • ‘Ironically, when a person is able to maintain a reputation for honesty, he or she is lauded.’
    • ‘The awards laud achievements in commercial, dramatic, and documentary film and television.’
    • ‘As a reward, I will mention your pasta-sauce-making attempt on the mainpage and laud you and revere you for all to see.’
    praise, extol, hail, applaud, acclaim, commend, admire, approve of, make much of, sing the praises of, lionize, speak highly of, pay homage to, pay tribute to, eulogize, sing paeans to
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noun

archaic
  • Praise.

    ‘all glory, laud, and honor to Thee’

Origin

Late Middle English: the noun from Old French laude, the verb from Latin laudare, both from Latin laus, laud- ‘praise’ (see also lauds).

Pronunciation

laud

/lɔd//lôd/