Definition of lanyard in English:

lanyard

noun

  • 1A rope threaded through a pair of deadeyes, used to adjust the tension in the rigging of a sailing vessel.

    • ‘The lanyard is held snug by the elasticity of the cord and by an adjustable slide consisting of interlocking O-rings.’
    • ‘The number two person ran the lanyards, swayed the munitions, and installed impulse carts in all the loaded stations.’
    • ‘As the engine was lowered, the lanyard had actuated a valve that drove the hoist to its stowed position.’
    • ‘The other three laughed and got the lanyards rigged up.’
    • ‘As with the cap, the loop is fairly flexible but after some tugging and pulling with the lanyard in place, the loop never tore.’
    • ‘But this action put tension on the parachute lanyard, allowing the rotor downwash to partly inflate the chute.’
    • ‘Little things like checking on the lanyards or the boat insurance can keep you young and happy in spirit.’
    • ‘When using vertical lifelines, use a lanyard 2 or 3 feet shorter than the standard 6 feet.’
    1. 1.1 A cord passed around the neck, shoulder, or wrist for holding a knife, whistle, or similar object.
      • ‘I think that the most basic lanyard is a simple blank metal ball chain.’
      • ‘Just throw the included lanyard around your neck and take a walk.’
      • ‘I walked out the door swinging my lanyard and smiling.’
      • ‘The gadget can be worn with a belt clip or a lanyard.’
      • ‘This promotional lanyard is an ideal marketing device to promote the business, or event.’
      • ‘Scattered about the room were t-shirts, lanyards, business cards, and various other samples of printed materials.’
      • ‘In addition to wearing a lanyard around the neck, it is not unusual to see lanyards attached to the wrist, waist, backpacks, and others.’
      • ‘Each lanyard had a picture and seemed to be an ID of some kind.’
      • ‘He had a lanyard around his neck with laminated tags on it.’
      • ‘Now, perhaps, we won't even be able to keep them in our inside pockets, but should keep them strung on a lanyard around our necks where they can be seen by both the police marksmen and the potential muggers who would steal them.’
      • ‘I looked first at the camera, saved by the lanyard round my wrist.’
      • ‘These five ounces also includes four ‘AA’ batteries and a lanyard!’
      • ‘This year in San Diego, a lot of people were wearing badges that were not clipped-on or pinned but were instead on a little lanyard around their necks.’
      • ‘They gave me a lovely nametag and lanyard and then turned me loose in the gaming room.’
      • ‘She unsnapped the lanyard from around her neck and slid her school ID in between the door and its frame.’
      • ‘Those lanyards are for keeping them safe - just loop them around your wrist.’
      • ‘Readers with even sharper eyes spotted the buttons of his jacket were on the left; his lanyard was on the left; his beret badge was on the right, and the trooper beside him had her name-tag on the wrong side.’
      • ‘Several models come packaged with a handy lanyard.’
      • ‘I was given a lanyard and told to wear my credentials at all times.’
      • ‘The lanyard is designed to secure small objects, such as badges, keys, cell phones, and other small items.’

Origin

Late Middle English lanyer, in the general sense ‘a short length of rope for securing something’, from Old French laniere. The change in the ending in the 17th century was due to association with yard.

Pronunciation

lanyard

/ˈlanyərd//ˈlænjərd/