Main definitions of lag in English

: lag1lag2lag3

lag1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Fall behind in movement, progress, or development; not keep pace with another or others.

    ‘they stopped to wait for one of the children who was lagging behind’
    • ‘People tend to think that Scotland is lagging behind other countries in the adoption of e-business.’
    • ‘But lesbians are still lagging far behind the general female populace in getting physical examinations, she said.’
    • ‘Clearly, New Zealand is lagging behind in failing to encourage more flexible working conditions for employees, especially when their children are young, and that is why I have drafted this bill.’
    • ‘High telephone charges means that British companies lag behind their American counterparts, he says.’
    • ‘By lawmakers' own admission, Ireland lagged woefully behind its Western counterparts when they introduced adoption legislation in 1952.’
    • ‘But the report notes that Africa lags behind the rest of the world.’
    • ‘I can tell the Labour members why they are lagging in the polls.’
    • ‘By 1936 RCA's research and development department was lagging behind Farnsworth in terms of screen size and sharpness of image.’
    • ‘But Hispanics continue to lag well behind the rest of the labor market in wages.’
    • ‘This parameter also determines the ability of the mouse to follow very rapid movements without lagging behind or making mistakes in the coordinates.’
    • ‘He said the ministry will enter into dialogue with the provincial education officer and teachers so that they could continue teaching classes to avoid the affected children lagging behind in lessons.’
    • ‘The MPs assured the President of continued support in the fight against corruption and poverty adding that if the vices were not eradicated the country will continue lagging behind in development.’
    • ‘The President said the bridge would boost the economy on Madura island, which has been largely untouched by development, lagging behind other regions in Indonesia.’
    • ‘We view stratocladistics as still in an early stage of development, with implementation lagging behind concept.’
    • ‘For many years naval officers' pay lagged well behind that of Army officers.’
    • ‘And the law is always reactive and lagging behind social developments.’
    • ‘Other economic development is lagging behind.’
    • ‘Based on these criteria, many countries are still lagging far behind.’
    • ‘The nuclear development is lagging behind the cytoplasmic maturation.’
    • ‘Customization seems to be one area where Google will lag behind its rivals.’
    fall behind, straggle, fall back, linger, dally, dawdle, hang back, delay, move slowly, loiter, drag one's feet, take one's time, not keep pace, idle, dither, saunter, bring up the rear
    dilly-dally, shilly-shally
    tarry
    View synonyms
  • 2North American Billiards
    Determine the order of play by striking the cue ball from balk to rebound off the top cushion, first stroke going to the player whose ball comes to rest nearer the bottom cushion.

    string

noun

  • 1A period of time between one event or phenomenon and another.

    ‘there was a time lag between the commission of the crime and its reporting to the police’
    • ‘China links domestic prices for crude oil and refined products to international prices, adjusted after a one-month lag.’
    • ‘Back in the old days, the time lag was considerably longer.’
    • ‘Faced with a simultaneously growing publication lag, the Journal necessarily tightened its standards.’
    • ‘During range expansions, a lag phase often precedes rapid population growth.’
    • ‘What one does not know is the time lag between changes in past performance and changes in expected future returns.’
    • ‘He explained that there may be a time lag between the creation of a favourable entrepreneurial environment and the emergence of an entrepreneurial class.’
    • ‘Actual figures will not be available until about June because of the time lag in collating the information from different operators.’
    • ‘Friedman points to variable lags between changes in money supply growth that determine the impact upon real output and prices.’
    • ‘Furthermore, both effects seem to operate with short lags.’
    • ‘The IR blaster solution worked well, except for a slight lag in remote control response.’
    • ‘Two phases of content leakage are observed: a lag phase and a burst phase.’
    • ‘The lag in the climate response is both a boon and a problem for policy-makers.’
    • ‘There may be a long time lag between the time of damage and the appearance of clinical signs.’
    • ‘General conclusions are that surface dyslexia represents a delay or developmental lag in acquiring literacy skills.’
    • ‘And yes, there is a time lag of several days before new entries appear.’
    • ‘Running applications and playing games were a breeze, with no noticeable lag.’
    • ‘Studies of the chemical industry in 2000 indicate a lag period of seven years.’
    • ‘As I've already mentioned, there seems to be a short lag of about one second though.’
    • ‘The latter depends critically on the time lag between environmental change and biotic responses to that environmental change.’
    • ‘The publication lag, from time of manuscript acceptance to appearance in print, is slightly more than two months.’
  • 2Physics
    A retardation in an electric current or movement.

    • ‘With a longitudinal bias field, there was a lag of about 3.5 ns as the magnetization responded to the switching pulse.’

Origin

Early 16th century (as a noun in the sense hindmost person (in a game, race, etc.) also dregs): related to the dialect adjective lag (perhaps from a fanciful distortion of last, or of Scandinavian origin: compare with Norwegian dialect lagga go slowly).

Pronunciation:

lag

/laɡ/

Main definitions of lag in English

: lag1lag2lag3

lag2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Enclose or cover (a boiler, pipes, etc.) with material that provides heat insulation.

    ‘a lagged hot-water tank’
    • ‘Mr Sharp worked on steam ships HMS Juno and HMS Phoebe during his military service. Pipes in both warships were lagged with asbestos material.’
    • ‘Yet Roger's death warrant was probably signed decades ago when he served on submarines in the 1960s and 1970s, at a time when asbestos was widely used to lag pipes.’
    • ‘However, these pipes could easily be buried underground and where they come to the surface they could be lagged so as to prevent freezing.’
    • ‘You can fit a three-inch insulating jacket and lag the pipes for as little as £10.’
    • ‘Other applications of aluminum include control tubing, tanks, covers, boiler lagging, jacketing, panels, and canopies.’
    • ‘They used preformed sections in a semi-circular shape to lag pipe work.’
    • ‘And why is there no mention of the historical significance of asbestos insulation used to lag the steam boilers?’
    • ‘Ensure your hot water cylinder and pipes are lagged.’
    • ‘They advise checking, and lagging all exposed pipes, keeping buildings heated and draining exposed pipes.’
    • ‘Customers are being advised to lag water pipes in homes and businesses as a precaution against the icy period, so if pipes burst it will save water and damage to properties.’
    • ‘For individual householders, this can means something as simple as lagging the boiler.’
    • ‘Cheap and fireproof, it was an all-purpose insulator used to lag buildings, railway carriages, even ironing boards.’
    • ‘It was a common practice at many industrial factories to lag pipes with asbestos, Mr Conyers-Kelly points out.’
    • ‘So dump the SUV, tell your kids to walk to school, turn down the central heating, insulate the attic, take shorter showers, use CFL bulbs and lag the hot water tank.’
    • ‘Uncovered pipes were lagged and eventually removed altogether in 1986 as regulations were tightened.’
    • ‘The Highways Agency said today that the material had not been used to lag the pipe, but dumped on the land at some time in the past, possibly before the full dangers of asbestos were known.’
    • ‘Fellow employee Alfred Smith said pipes at the factory were lagged with material containing a white, powdery substance.’
    • ‘The charity also recommends checking all pipes are properly lagged, all electric fires are guarded, and paraffin heaters are out of draughts.’

noun

  • 1The non-heat-conducting cover of a boiler, pipes, etc.; lagging.

    1. 1.1A piece of this.

Origin

Late 19th century: from earlier lag piece of insulating cover.

Pronunciation:

lag

/laɡ/

Main definitions of lag in English

: lag1lag2lag3

lag3

noun

British
informal
  • A person who has been frequently convicted and sent to prison.

    ‘both old lags were sentenced to ten years' imprisonment’
    • ‘Operational reasons, old lags will recall, is British policespeak for ‘I'm not going to tell you,’ while one million is policespeak for two million.’
    • ‘The tiny fledgling local police in the Maranoa prior to the Native squads were mostly lonely, frightened old lags, who became drinking mates of the offending stockmen, says Collins.’
    • ‘In order to find out, he stuck 18 volunteers in a mock prison, arbitrarily making them either lags or screws.’
    • ‘He could have handled prison, he thinks, because he gets on with everybody but, who knows, he could have run into some old lags who hated the Rollers.’
    • ‘Throughout the present brief, Microsoft protests its innocence with as much conviction as an old lag before a magistrate.’
    • ‘If Ian McGeechan was hoping that this tour would build some genuine team spirit and confidence amongst the mixture of old lags and tyros who made up the Scotland test side yesterday, then he was sorely mistaken.’
    • ‘It is partly because of old lags enjoying favours from prison officers that the murderer is at large, four other men having been wrongly convicted.’
    • ‘You can see why Hoskins might nurse an affinity for Rififi, which is as hard-boiled as a 10-minute egg and home to a rogues' gallery of old lags who know all the angles.’
    • ‘He is not a politician with a career to revive, who stepped up to the brief what seems to us old lags like a few short weeks ago.’
    • ‘It's a straightforward, unimaginative slasher picture about a serial killer convict, one Leo Rook, who kills off warders and fellow lags one by one when they are marooned on a lighthouse.’
    • ‘It matters not one jot that old lags like Spedding, the great Paul Thompson and producer Rhett Davies are along for the ride.’
    • ‘What's next, jailhouse pubs and brothels for the lags?’
    • ‘Carandiru is more measured, and even stately, in the way its old lags - fundamentally respectful - troop through the doctor's infirmary and recount their autobiographies.’
    • ‘In Westminster, old lags used to tell rookie MPs to remember that, while they were attacking the opposition benches, their real enemies were right behind them.’
    • ‘Be this as it may, the old lags could not have been more friendly to this distinctly new Labourish apparition.’
    • ‘Watson's fellow old lags who were released at the same time lined up outside the prison to tell anyone who would listen that the disgraced peer was not much of a hit on the inside.’
    • ‘Which is probably the result of form that would shame any old prison lag.’
    • ‘The Home Office has rejected plans to give lags access to the internet and email while doing porridge.’
    • ‘The lags at Full Sutton jail near York are all sorted.’
    • ‘Well, I guess they would not be lags, because lags would have been given custodial sentences.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]British
Archaic, informal
  • Arrest or send to prison.

Origin

Late 16th century (as a verb in the sense carry off, steal): of unknown origin. Current senses date from the 19th century.

Pronunciation:

lag

/laɡ/