Definition of ladder-back in US English:

ladder-back

(also ladder-back chair)

noun

  • An upright chair with a back resembling a ladder.

    • ‘Pressing her hand to her mouth to stifle a sudden cry, Lorna sank into a ladder-back chair.’
    • ‘There was also a stool and a ladder-back chair in the room.’
    • ‘The chairs displayed, mainly from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, are of only two types: windsors and rush-seated ladder-back chairs.’
    • ‘With these simple slipcovers, designed for ladder-back and other straight-back chairs, you can change your room's ambience in a matter of minutes.’
    • ‘She started buying antiques when a ladder-back chair cost ten dollars.’
    • ‘During 1890 Gimson spent a few weeks with Clissett learning how to make ladder-back chairs with rush seats.’
    • ‘The table was a heavy oak farm-style one with six ladder-back chairs around it.’
    • ‘There are the much copied ladder-backs designed for the Willow Tea Rooms circa 1903, but there is certain to be keen bidding for several earlier chairs made for the Argyle Street Tea Rooms and the Ingram Street Tea Rooms.’
    • ‘Made by her mother, these monogrammed covers slip right over her ladder-backs: ‘Mom knows I don't like to mess with ties and stuff.‘’
    • ‘We looked at that - just based on the pictures, I feel - Les and I talked about it - it's a copy of a circa 1720 or '40 New England mushroom handhold ladder-back chair.’
    • ‘Stone had made effective use of such established concepts and patterns as the ladder-back chair, which southern rural communities had long relied on.’

Pronunciation

ladder-back

/ˈladərˌbak/