Definition of lackey in US English:

lackey

nounPlural lackeys

  • 1A servant, especially a liveried footman or manservant.

    • ‘This is a man who treats women like servants and men like lackeys.’
    • ‘But if that looks like the record of loyal family retainers, slaving away un-noticed in the ‘big house’ like some Victorian lackeys, think again.’
    • ‘"Edward must've sent his lackeys to find us, " Aruna mused.’
    • ‘Voltaire, despite gaining renown as the greatest living French playwright while still in his twenties, endured a long stay in the Bastille, a thorough beating by an offended nobleman's lackeys, and several periods of exile.’
    • ‘He had to watch himself, had to act like any common, worthless lackey for the sake of self-preservation until he had everything organized and put perfectly into place.’
    • ‘Simon Trinder turns Teodoro's lackey into a bundle of popeyed, inventive energy.’
    • ‘Also present are Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, the king's unfortunately clueless lackeys and subjects of Tom Stoppard's work Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead.’
    • ‘He said: ‘I was the lackey of the team who does the running about for the water bottles and sandwiches, but I also got a brilliant opportunity to ride as part of a racing team competing along my sporting heroes.’’
    • ‘And the sorceress Ro sent out a servant boy and her lackey Isamu to go shopping.’
    • ‘The original has more than 30 characters plus assorted lackeys, pastry cooks and cadets to help create a vision of life in 17 th-century Paris.’
    • ‘Kerry talks in generalities because he is alone and comes from nowhere and lives among servants and lackeys in hotel rooms.’
    • ‘Ruby and her lackeys were standing around the alter, Ruby's hands were on the stake, ready to plunge it into her heart.’
    • ‘In July 1702 he was offered the post of organist at Sangerhausen but was thwarted by the reigning duke, who preferred a candidate of his own choice; for several months thereafter he occupied his time as a lackey and violinist at Weimar.’
    • ‘No, she wouldn't unleash her rage upon a mere lackey.’
    • ‘He lived in the great house in Doocastle surrounded by servants, lackeys, and half-sirs who did his bidding without question.’
    • ‘Cypris' lackeys just stood there, speechless, and awaited instructions for what to do.’
    • ‘It was the morning of his wedding and one could already hear the sound of the Marquise au Fontaine calling out instructions to the lackeys and servants.’
    • ‘I would send the lackey after him to let him know if I needed him.’
    • ‘A little while later some of the host's lackeys brought out about a dozen chooks in a long wire cage which they laid in the centre of the table.’
    • ‘When asked who comes with Petruchio, Biondello responds, ‘O, sir, his lackey, for all the world caparisoned like the horse’.’
    servant, flunkey, footman, manservant, valet, liveried servant, steward, butler, equerry, retainer, vassal, page, attendant, houseboy, domestic, drudge, factotum
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    1. 1.1derogatory A person who is obsequiously willing to obey or serve another person or group of people.
      • ‘Sometimes they are heroes - doctors and engineers cleaning up slums, lawyers fighting for the rights of oppressed minorities; and sometimes they are villains - stooges and lackeys of the ruling class.’
      • ‘Such is the life of a corporate lackey.’
      • ‘He disdains capitalism and free trade, and throughout the campaign accused Yushchenko of being a running-dog lackey of the Yankee imperialists.’
      • ‘King Idris is involved, of course, this place could not exist without his permission, but he is a mere lackey.’
      • ‘I saved you because you and your lackeys over there serve a purpose.’
      • ‘By the end he sees that in the house of the film star he is regarded as ‘a lackey, a sponger, a pathetic hanger-on’.’
      • ‘He's a stark contrast to the new men in Penelope's life: though Herb fancies himself a man's man, his total admiration of Harold results is his becoming a sycophantic lackey who takes on the role of surrogate wife.’
      • ‘Anyway, you're not doing anyone any good by being out of work, even if your old boss is a running dog lackey of the bourgeoisie.’
      • ‘They have turned into mere lackeys of big business.’
      • ‘We already have a President and the Rodent is his biggest crawling, lick-spittle lackey.’
      • ‘And, this group of people no longer had real power, over real things; they had the power to become lackeys; and to serve as lackeys.’
      • ‘Nor does sympathy for what Americans are going through make us capitalist lackeys, stooges of Bush and Blair, or enemies of the Arab world.’
      • ‘Radio stations lend their microphones to these degenerate rappers who start wars on the air that end up affecting all their sycophants, toadies and lackeys who want to keep it real.’
      • ‘I am no-one's stooge, lackey or puppet.’
      • ‘Was I being an agent of change or just another instructional lackey creating ordinary teachers?’
      • ‘I know Blair has many well paid advisers, but here is a bit of free advice: if you are going to hire a lackey and a yes man, then hire a clever one who understands the importance of subtlety.’
      • ‘If, on the other hand, he jacks up, he is a snivelling traitor, an America hater, a betrayer of Australian business and/or a pawn and lackey of selfish vested interest groups, a man who puts cheap populism ahead of his country.’
      • ‘The anti-MMR campaign has repeatedly smeared its critics either as stooges of the medical establishment or as lackeys of the vaccine manufacturers (themes which recur in Hear the Silence).’
      • ‘I also lament the fact that we are here in urgency because the toadies and lackeys of the United Future party have decided to sign up to the use of urgency without even testing the questions that they should properly have asked.’
      • ‘Am I an elitist bastard running-dog lackey etc for believing that only people who actually care should make the decisions?’
      toady, flunkey, sycophant, flatterer, minion, doormat, dogsbody, spaniel, stooge, hanger-on, lickspittle, parasite
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verblackeys, lackeying, lackeyed

[with object]archaic
  • Behave servilely to; wait upon as a lackey.

Origin

Early 16th century: from French laquais, perhaps from Catalan alacay, from Arabic al-qā'id ‘the chief’.

Pronunciation

lackey

/ˈlakē//ˈlæki/