Definition of label in US English:

label

noun

  • 1A small piece of paper, fabric, plastic, or similar material attached to an object and giving information about it.

    • ‘Read the label and patient information leaflet, provided with your medicine, carefully and always follow the instructions.’
    • ‘If you've checked the nutrition information on the label and thought the calorie, fat and sodium content seemed surprisingly low, check the serving size.’
    • ‘Some labels will carry information on the right calorific intake for an ‘average’ person, but that is not helpful for the many non-average consumers.’
    • ‘Be sure to read and understand all labels and information provided or required to be provided with materials that you may purchase, store, or use.’
    • ‘Sophie Lorimer, prosecuting, said that a security officer began tracking Rooney after seeing her remove price labels and security tags from items of clothing.’
    • ‘The responsibilities of the food sector in producing safe food and providing accurate information on the label should be emphasised.’
    • ‘A toll-free phone number is available on the label for updated information on the industry's program.’
    • ‘The Food Labelling Group recognised the concerns of consumers that there needed to be clearer information on labels in relation to allergens.’
    • ‘The information panels and labels, on the other hand, are strongly ethnographic so that the exhibition can work at both levels.’
    • ‘On the evidence label attached to the material was written the word ‘debris’.’
    • ‘Empty bottles with attached labels are obtainable, but even they are expensive.’
    • ‘However, manufacturers could be breaking the law if the information on labels is misleading to the public.’
    • ‘My mother works part-time in a factory where she weighs chickens before sealing them in plastic and then attaching labels.’
    • ‘After all, the majority of the consumers apparently do not pay much attention to the information given on the label.’
    • ‘Our bin has been put out regularly on the date stipulated on the attached label.’
    • ‘The label contains valuable information for taking the medicine properly.’
    • ‘Product labels provide information on safe handling and application.’
    • ‘Before taking any medicine, read the label and any accompanying information.’
    • ‘Representatives of the tax authorities said they have come across incidents when the excise labels had been attached to the bottles with adhesive tape or rubber bands.’
    • ‘The authority stressed that the information contained on food labels should be clear, unambiguous and must not make misleading or false claims.’
    tag, ticket, tab, sticker, marker, docket, chit, chitty, flag, stamp
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A piece of fabric sewn inside a garment and bearing the brand name, size, or instructions for care.
      • ‘This, for anyone not in the know, is the surreptitious act of slapping size 10 labels on clothes that are really a 12.’
      • ‘If you were going to give away a T-shirt, no one much cared what it said on the label.’
      • ‘Washable rayon will state the care on the fabric label.’
      • ‘Check the garment's label for recommended wash temperature to prevent colors from fading and dyes from running.’
      • ‘If you put a care label under the brand label, it would really ruin the whole thing.’
      • ‘Check the label and care for them according to the manufacturer's instructions.’
      • ‘Finally, don't fret if your pattern size is larger than your ready-to-wear size - there won't be any size labels on the finished garment!’
      • ‘But do I want to pay twice or three times the cost of a normal garment just to sport a brand label?’
      • ‘Check labels on garments and other textile items and never dry with heat those items which warn against such drying lest a fire start.’
      • ‘The first thing any of us look at when we pick up a piece of apparel is the label in the neck.’
      • ‘Aren't there any tags or labels inside the boot that could give us a hint?’
      • ‘Care labels and hangs tags were supplied by Rockywoods Outdoor Fabrics.’
      • ‘First and foremost, always follow the cleaning instructions on your garment's label.’
      • ‘The label on the inside of my jeans tells me that I am just the right size for a man my age, that I should turn them inside out to wash them and to keep away from fire.’
      • ‘I stared at the size label hard and wondered if he would drown in it.’
      • ‘The first step is to discern which pieces should be dry-cleaned by reading the labels on your clothing.’
      • ‘As a result people are growing fatter without realising it as they can still fit into clothes with ‘smaller’ size labels.’
      • ‘If a garment label says ‘washable,’ does that mean it can't be dry-cleaned?’
      • ‘Later in the station he photographed a label attached to the trouser leg.’
      • ‘It was then that he noticed the label inside the pants.’
    2. 1.2 The piece of paper in the center of a phonograph record giving the artist and title.
    3. 1.3 A company that produces recorded music.
      ‘independent labels’
      • ‘I cannot imagine submitting my material to a label and having them reject my new work and refuse to release it.’
      • ‘When we started our record label, disco music was selling.’
      • ‘I look forward to forging an on-going dialogue with artist, labels, and others concerning this and all related issues.’
      • ‘And, some labels don't care about trends and release whatever they like - hoping that you'll like it too.’
      • ‘Puff Daddy, Jay-Z, Nelly and other artists own their own labels or hold large executive rights.’
      • ‘With the offices of major record labels closed and no one around to promote the music, it means that your label just doesn't care whether you succeed or fail.’
      • ‘Set up in the summer of 1998 in Paris, Active Suspension has become one of the most forward thinking record labels to come out of France.’
      • ‘This allows an artist or their label to know how many times a song is played and provides practical information that is crucial when a band approaches stores about retailing its music.’
      • ‘Since then Migs has become one of the label's most visible artists.’
      • ‘Do you have plans to use the label to release material by bands other than yourselves?’
      • ‘Our goal was to sell 10,000 in the first year, since the label is brand new and this is the first record out on it.’
      • ‘When signing with a major label, an artist's advance is expected to fund the recording of an album, with the balance going into the artist's pocket.’
      • ‘It was up to the smaller independent labels to record and market new sounds.’
      • ‘Perhaps of greater concern, this model would entail a radical rethinking of how record labels deliver products.’
      • ‘Artists sign with labels because they see it as the only way to sell albums and make a living.’
      • ‘At a major label, most artists are unlikely to earn anything unless they sell at least 1 million albums, and even then, they could wind up in debt.’
      • ‘A few of those artists and labels are highlighted here, as well.’
      • ‘So, for a city with no urban radio station, no artists signed to major labels, and no videos in heavy rotation, we seem to have a lot going for us.’
      • ‘We, as musicians, need the resources of record labels to promote our music.’
      • ‘Musicians and others concerned about rebellious music should work to create independent bands, record labels, venues, and stores.’
    4. 1.4 The name or trademark of a fashion company.
      ‘she plans to launch her own designer clothes label’
      • ‘I spotted a handful of guys donning suits with designer labels on their sleeves.’
      • ‘It's no coincidence that most of today's major fashion labels push their own line of hats to complement their brand of clothing and accessories.’
      • ‘Versace launched his fashion label in 1978 and the year before his death made pre-tax profits of £60m.’
      • ‘He created the fashion label, food lines and then an airline all branded Kingfisher.’
      • ‘She dumped her many bags at her feet, the designer labels of Gucci, Versace and Prada among many other charming store names marked clearly on the side of the bags.’
      • ‘Bebe has a very similar one for $169 if you like the design more than you care about the label.’
      • ‘It's ostensibly a menswear label, but women also wear it.’
      • ‘The head designers for cutting-edge labels such as Armani Exchange and Lafayette 148, for example, are Black.’
      • ‘It included quality copies of expensive garments by labels such as Burberry, Ted Baker and Hugo Boss and shoes by Nike.’
      • ‘I think men are much more aware of designer labels and fashion trends than they were even a year ago.’
      • ‘While waiting for our main courses, Jackie O attempted to persuade us that she had interests beyond fashion labels.’
      • ‘I find it rather comical that skinheads are worried about their designer labels.’
      • ‘With four knitting machines they produce knitwear for other labels, until Rosita decides that they must produce their own line.’
      • ‘If one of their coping strategies is to fetishise a few silly fashion labels, isn't that forgivable?’
      • ‘Brands included Adidas, Nike, Nope Susst, labels for the fashion conscious.’
      • ‘There are five lunchtime catwalk shows, showcasing new designers, colleges and alternative fashion labels.’
      • ‘Think about it; a belt is one of two accessories you wear just about every day, so you'll get plenty of mileage out of your extra dollars spent on a designer label.’
      • ‘The new entity, will continue to use Rosen's labels and trademarks, including the ‘Cedar Springs’ line of lamb products.’
      • ‘Dubai has a range of fashion houses, from designer labels like Armani to economy brands like Giordano.’
      • ‘He was voted best student in 2002 at the Technikon, a year before he started his fashion label called ANNEX.’
      brand, brand name, trade name, trademark, proprietary name, line, make, logo
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  • 2A classifying phrase or name applied to a person or thing, especially one that is inaccurate or restrictive.

    ‘my reluctance to stick a label on myself politically’
    • ‘As in past case studies, we need to begin by handling sociocultural labels with care.’
    • ‘He considered retiring from the movie scene when the Jack the Joker label stuck too firmly after the release of Batman.’
    • ‘And I always wondered why they tried to stick the angry label on him.’
    • ‘Honestly, I don't care about labels - liberal or conservative.’
    • ‘I'm not so attached to the label of being ‘straight’ that I'm about to fight about it.’
    • ‘In parallel, in Austria the label of ‘degenerate artist’ meant Berg had to fight to the last for any musical freedom.’
    • ‘Those of us who self-identify as being part of the left are constantly battling with the seemingly trivial issue of political labels.’
    • ‘The disappeared have acquired names and faces and labels: The sister, the lover, the dental technician, the office cleaner, the oil executive.’
    • ‘But as they point out, ‘most people would rather be referred to by their name than by a label.’’
    • ‘If you try and argue about moral matters and talk about principles you'll get these labels attached to you.’
    • ‘He expressed concern that Tralee has been described as a dirty town and he warned that the label will stick if the local people allow it to.’
    • ‘For now, the US seems to be avoiding the genocide label but is sticking with ethnic cleansing to describe the situation.’
    • ‘Both parties try to tag their opponents' policies with phrases and labels intended to place them in the most negative light.’
    • ‘It is easy to stick a label on a group of people without getting to know them as individuals first.’
    • ‘But the label stuck and politically I was ‘right wing’.’
    • ‘That was a fundamental contribution of Menzies and the label has stuck.’
    • ‘Won't some kids be stuck with a label very early on, when actually they might well change?’
    • ‘Does anybody really think that ‘homosexual’ as a label describes one specific biological condition and that every gay person is an identical clone?’
    • ‘You cannot stick labels on some relationships.’
    • ‘As everywhere, political labels were stuck on innumerable long-standing local antagonisms and vendettas and provided new justifications for pursuing them.’
    designation, denomination, description, characterization, identification, tag
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 (in a dictionary entry) a word or words used to specify the subject area, register, or geographical origin of the word being defined.
      • ‘Interestingly, Australian-edited dictionaries no longer use ‘slang’ as a register label.’
    2. 2.2Computing A string of characters used to refer to a particular instruction in a program.
      • ‘The system creates a unique identifier or label for each stored object.’
      • ‘To force the paradigm, Geoff Cohen was talking about a computer language where names and labels were outlawed.’
      • ‘If there is a label in any given line, we save the label and the device filename in a hash.’
      • ‘The lack of consistency in program labels and definitions nationwide creates a thorny obstacle to research synthesis.’
    3. 2.3Chemistry Biology A radioactive isotope, fluorescent dye, or enzyme used to make something identifiable for study.
      • ‘The majority of the methods are based on the fluorescence measurements or on the usage of radioactive labels for detecting matter flux.’
      • ‘Alternatively, the presence of the protein of interest on the gel can be detected by using a detectable label - e.g. a radioactive ion or compound to the protein.’
      • ‘These machines attached different colored fluorescent tags to the DNA fragments instead of radioactive labels, and read them off automatically.’
      • ‘A radioactive label within the DNA permits direct visualization and quantitation of the results.’
      • ‘Some techniques involve the application of radioactive labels to the proteins.’
  • 3Heraldry
    A narrow horizontal strip, typically with three downward projections, that is superimposed on a coat of arms by an eldest son during the life of his father.

    • ‘Every member of the family is awarded a distinctive coat of arms with a label, issued by Royal Warrant from the Queen rather than a grant of arms from the heralds as others receive.’
  • 4Architecture

    another term for dripstone

verb

[with object]
  • 1Attach a label to (something)

    ‘she labeled the parcels neatly, writing the addresses in capital letters’
    • ‘Each one was labeled with the name of a crew member.’
    • ‘It was labelled with the name of one of the directors of the hotel.’
    • ‘I looked more closely and saw that there were rows across labeled with the names of all the rooms.’
    • ‘He flipped the light on and noticed the bottle of pills, as well as the paper labeled with his name.’
    • ‘Hasted met me at his office, and showed me a drawer full of broken and bent spoons, each labeled with names and dates.’
    • ‘These pictures are glued down to a large sheet of construction paper and the sheets are labeled with the name of the concept.’
    • ‘You cannot mark or label your package as containing firearms.’
    • ‘For example, if syringes are not labeled with the name of the medication they contain, people inadvertently may give a patient the wrong medication.’
    • ‘The roads are labeled with the names of animals: Hawk, Hen, Rabbit, Lion.’
    • ‘Each of the first entries is labelled with the name of the voice.’
    • ‘Many doors lined the walls, and each door was labeled with the name of a place.’
    • ‘Almost everything on the floor has a designated position and is labeled as such and is kept in that position.’
    • ‘Children's cubbies are usually labeled with their names.’
    • ‘Workbook exercises are labeled to correspond neatly with the main text they support.’
    • ‘Some tapes were labelled with the names of children and women and detailed information about the film, even whether the footage was light or dark.’
    • ‘The majority of the vehicles are labelled with essential details - model, brand and year - and in some cases special features are also mentioned.’
    • ‘On learning that the cancer had returned yet again she went about labelling her jewellery to be left to family and friends and writing letters for the family to be opened at Christmas knowing that she would no longer be with us.’
    • ‘White lines on a black floor are labeled with names of streets.’
    • ‘I shook my head as I flipped through the hanging outfits until I came to one labeled with my name.’
    • ‘Each light is labelled with its musical name as well as its scientific frequency.’
    tag, attach labels to, put labels on, tab, ticket, stamp, mark, put stickers on, docket, flag
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  • 2Assign to a category, especially inaccurately or restrictively.

    with object and complement ‘the critics labeled him a loser’
    ‘children were labeled as bullies’
    • ‘Many people around the world who were once labelled as terrorists are now regarded as international leaders or even statesmen.’
    • ‘Even so, Taylor said that the playoffs are a new season and the team is striving for a national championship despite being labelled as underdogs.’
    • ‘What really hurt them was being labelled as under-achievers.’
    • ‘One of the reasons we made the film was to present a different picture of people who have been labelled as ‘mentally ill’ than normally appears in the media.’
    • ‘There is a generation of activists that have been labelled as criminals for expressing dissent.’
    • ‘She says she was labelled as a ‘troublemaker’ in her small hometown.’
    • ‘Measures designed to promote and protect local educational values could be labelled as ‘barriers to trade’.’
    • ‘The student who enters grad school intent on becoming a traditional humanist is the student who will be labelled as hopelessly unsophisticated by her peers and her professors.’
    • ‘But to have worked so hard, put so many hours in and sacrificed so much only to then be labelled as a racist is wrong.’
    • ‘On the other hand, you can risk being labelled as a mindless automaton by never going out on a limb and only writing about ‘safe’ things.’
    • ‘Kingston Council has once again been labelled as an ‘excellent’ local authority.’
    • ‘I think that it's fair to say that this book should really be labelled as a failed experiment, shelved, and forgotten about.’
    • ‘While we choose not to be labelled as such, it behooves us to reflect on the sadness and self loathing we experience as a result of performing acts of escapism.’
    • ‘We need to accept that the majority of young people don't commit crime and those that do need help and support, rather than being labelled as bad or evil.’
    • ‘Despite being labelled as weak Havering councillors were putting on a brave face and pointing out they were at least moving in the right direction.’
    • ‘Nance, 26, of York, kept her gift a secret throughout her school days for fear of being labelled as ‘different’.’
    • ‘A group of youths in Silsden are fed up being labelled as vandals and are working with Silsden Business Watch to find an area where they can ride their bikes.’
    • ‘A Brentwood mother has labelled the postal service appalling after an important parcel took almost three weeks to arrive.’
    • ‘One is tempted to conclude that it reflects a fear that anyone who is publicly critical of the extent of the problems will be labelled as a racist or similar.’
    • ‘Rangers star Ronald de Boer last night angrily labelled the one-year ban imposed on his brother Frank as a miscarriage of justice.’
    categorize, classify, class, characterize, describe, designate, identify
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Origin

Middle English (denoting a narrow strip): from Old French, ‘ribbon’, probably of Germanic origin and related to lap.

Pronunciation

label

/ˈlābəl//ˈleɪbəl/