Definition of knit in English:

knit

verb

  • 1with object Make (a garment, blanket, etc.) by interlocking loops of wool or other yarn with knitting needles or on a machine.

    • ‘I'm also knitting a sweater for a friend's new baby.’
    • ‘My granny knitted that scarf for me when I went to high school and it meant a lot to me.’
    • ‘I've knitted a scarf for Jr, and now I'm making one for me.’
    • ‘When we were kids, my Aunt Joan knitted Christmas stockings for everybody in the family.’
    • ‘Tonight I was finishing up a hat I had knitted for my niece.’
    • ‘My grandmother knit it for my Dad when he went off to university.’
    • ‘Members of the cooperative spin and dye wool, knit sweaters, and also make ceramic crafts.’
    • ‘In the blistering heat, and in true family tradition, I was dressed in corduroys and a heavy knitted sweater.’
    • ‘I came across her in the sitting room avidly reading a magazine while knitting a scarf for the hospice shop.’
    • ‘In her spare time, she knitted socks and jumpers.’
    • ‘She passed by the living room, where his mother was sitting in a rocking chair, knitting a sweater.’
    • ‘Today she was wearing one of her muddy brown, knitted sweaters, flared bellbottoms, and those fancy Birkenstock sandals.’
    • ‘Over that, she had a blue sweater that her grandmother had knitted for her.’
    • ‘After breakfast, Rema sat in the living room to finish knitting a sweater for Maria.’
    • ‘My grandmother annually knits sweaters for all the grandchildren.’
    • ‘All jumpers, cardigans and socks were knitted by hand.’
    • ‘In the evenings, my mother read to us, and we knitted socks and sweaters for my dad in the army, and listened to the radio.’
    • ‘She wore a white knitted sweater with a matching skirt.’
    • ‘I'm also spending this weekend trying to finish knitting a baby sweater.’
    • ‘Aunt Christina sat beside him knitting a primrose-coloured jumper for me.’
    1. 1.1 Make (a stitch or row of stitches) by interlocking loops of yarn.
      • ‘As if to affirm this truth, she rapidly knitted five more rows in one minute flat.’
      • ‘At last I could knit a few rows, enjoy the process and then set down the needles.’
      • ‘It's infuriating to knit 160 stitches and then find you have 12 stitches to go to finish the row and about 2 inches of yarn left.’
      • ‘After I knit about five rows, I saw my stitches were off and the pattern didn't look right.’
      • ‘The first thing we knitted was a kettle holder by casting on 20 stitches and knitting each row plain until it became a square.’
    2. 1.2 Knit with a knit stitch.
      ‘knit one, purl one’
      • ‘Frowning in irritation, she picked up the lost stitch and started over, muttering darkly under her breath as she did so. ‘Purl one, knit one, purl one.’’
  • 2Unite or cause to unite.

    no object ‘disparate regions had begun to knit together under the king’
    as adjective , with submodifier ‘a closely knit family’
    with object ‘he knitted together a squad of players other clubs had disregarded’
    • ‘And we've been a close knit trio every since.’
    • ‘The closely knit community has rallied round to help the MacDonald family as they rebuild their lives.’
    • ‘Traditional Thai families are closely knit, often incorporating servants and employees.’
    • ‘We are very fortunate to have a group of staff who knit together as a team and excel in what they do.’
    • ‘These men were knit together by the personal bond they each had with their king or chieftain.’
    • ‘This is a very difficult situation for Michael and for his family, but in some sense, it's made him and his family stronger, and even more closely knit.’
    • ‘And, in attempting to knit together the play's domestic and political strands, Mitchell overloads the final scene.’
    • ‘Increasingly the county was knit together by improvements in transport.’
    • ‘He says that his account is knitted together from eye-witness evidence at the trial.’
    • ‘After all, electronic communication is the fastest way to knit together an operation that has spread to 30 locations around the world.’
    • ‘Small-leaved plants that tolerate close clipping will quickly knit together to form a seamless hedge.’
    • ‘Yet more often than not, efforts to knit together national economies fall victim to obstructionism.’
    • ‘The family system is so closely knit here that there is simply no room for any one member of the family to be discarded.’
    • ‘The book consists of disparate material roughly knitted together.’
    • ‘It was clear he was going to be fit for the Olympics, but he was worried about how the team would knit together.’
    • ‘He said it was very heartening to see such a closely knit family.’
    • ‘Europe, viciously divided against itself for centuries, has knit together into a democratic and civil society.’
    • ‘This idea enabled the two theories to be knitted together, and the differing concepts they embodied to be brought into a working relationship.’
    • ‘Many houses have large kitchens in which closely knit Belgian families can gather.’
    • ‘The problem is that the show doesn't knit together.’
    unite, become united, unify, become unified, become one, come together, become closer, band together, bond, combine, coalesce, merge, meld, blend, amalgamate, league
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1no object (of parts of a broken bone) become joined during healing.
      • ‘Bruises fade, cuts heal, bones knit; the trick is staying alive long enough for it to happen.’
      • ‘When he was later transferred to the government hospital at his parents' request, the doctors found that his bones had knitted in the wrong way and could not be corrected.’
      • ‘The bones had started to knit long before she'd been brought into the hospital.’
      • ‘The bone knitted back together and the flesh and muscle followed.’
      • ‘For the first 12 weeks I lay in bed at home in a morphine-induced haze as my bones slowly knitted.’
      • ‘Some fractured bones do not knit back together well and this can lead to a slow recovery, with surgery needed to help the bones to unite.’
      • ‘Broken bones knit, wounds heal often without scarring or permanent disability and those that do scar, although unsightly, leave less of a mark than scars on the mind.’
      • ‘My physician had not put my arm in a cast, so any movement was quite painful until the bones knitted.’
      • ‘He was taken to York District Hospital, where surgeons operated the next day, inserting a pin in the tibia to help knit the bones together.’
      • ‘He went for a final scan and it was all clear and the bone has knitted perfectly.’
      • ‘At least four of those weeks will require that arm being splinted while the bone knits back together.’
      • ‘This may be necessary where the broken ends of bone cannot easily be brought back together or kept close enough to allow them to knit together.’
      heal, mend, join, fuse, draw together, unite, become whole
      View synonyms
  • 3with object Tighten (one's brow or eyebrows) in a frown of concentration, disapproval, or anxiety.

    • ‘The waiter knitted his bushy eyebrows together and cocked his head slightly.’
    • ‘Joey knitted his eyebrows, not knowing what she meant.’
    • ‘Eric knitted his eyebrows together and frowned.’
    • ‘She looked up at him, confusion knitting her brows.’
    • ‘She knitted her brow, then took another look at the stitches.’
    • ‘His brows were knitted into a deep frown; his hands clutched at his stomach.’
    • ‘She knit her eyebrows together and set her finger on her chin.’
    • ‘She frowned and knitted her eyebrows in frustration.’
    • ‘He knitted his eye brows in frustration and turned to glare at Faye.’
    • ‘Her eyebrows were knitted together, and her lips trembled.’
    • ‘Ben knitted his eyebrows and pursed his lips, clearly revealing his concern.’
    • ‘Dinah shook her head, knitting her brows together.’
    • ‘Her eyebrows were knitted together in concentration, as if trying to remember something.’
    • ‘Her perfectly plucked eyebrows were knit together in a frown.’
    • ‘His eyebrows were knitted together in what looked like a hint of frustration.’
    • ‘I set the photo on the desk and stared at it, knitting my brow.’
    • ‘He knitted his eyebrows in obvious bewilderment.’
    • ‘Janice frowned and knitted her eyebrows together.’
    • ‘Joel's brown eyebrows were knitted in a small frown.’
    • ‘I knitted my brow, a bit confused as to the direction this conversation was taking.’
    furrow, tighten, contract, gather, draw in, wrinkle, pucker, knot, screw up, crease, scrunch up
    View synonyms

adjective

  • Denoting or relating to a knitting stitch made by putting the needle through the front of the stitch from left to right.

    Compare with purl
    • ‘I've got the knit stitch down now, though not very consistent.’
    • ‘I've ripped back a few times already, whenever I happen to notice a misplaced purl or knit stitch.’

noun

  • 1A knitted fabric.

    ‘a machine-washable knit’
    • ‘She wore a black ankle-length skirt with a scarlet knit shirt with three quarter sleeves.’
    • ‘The style is tight-fitting with side vents and an elastic waistband, typically made out of cotton or cotton/polyester blend jersey knit.’
    • ‘A dense design embroidered on a lightweight knit weighs down the fabric surrounding the design.’
    • ‘$1.55 sounds a bit too cheap for even a medium/light cotton knit in plain white.’
    • ‘A young pregnant woman in a yellow knit dress bustled in and selected floor 12.’
    • ‘She pulled her hat further over her ears, wrapped a long knit scarf around her nose and mouth, then hurried down the street.’
    • ‘Sweater knits are one of the easiest fabrics to sew, even for a beginner.’
    • ‘When she came out again, she wore white denim shorts, a sleeveless knit top, and canvas deck shoes.’
    • ‘It is made of 100% combed cotton brushed knit, and is colorfast so darks will stay dark.’
    • ‘Fabrics that do not require ironing, knits for example, are great because they do not crease and still look good at the end of the day.’
    • ‘Her hair was tucked under a knit cap she had just bought, making her eyes look bigger than usual.’
    • ‘Sweater knit is usually sold by the yard, in panels or in kits.’
    • ‘Fusible knits can add body to garments without any crispness, and can be used to reduce wrinkling on some fabrics, like linen.’
    • ‘Some of the knit dresses showed off so much thigh that they looked like tops.’
    • ‘Fluffy woolens, down-filled quilted layers, and synthetic thermal weaves and knits all work well in freezing temperatures.’
    • ‘Don't allow the fabric to hang off the cutting surface, it will stretch and distort the knit.’
    • ‘We sat for a long while before the front door flung open, a woman with a knit hat and a big jacket scuffled in, ran to the back, and quickly came to our table.’
    • ‘The knit shirts have one pocket and the woven shirts have one or two pockets.’
    • ‘Another popular vintage detail is a shirt collar made from a different fabric, usually a knit.’
    • ‘There are knits like soft jerseys and heavy fleece.’
    1. 1.1 A garment made of a knitted fabric.
      ‘an array of casual knits’
      • ‘When shopping for warm clothes, especially woollen knits, it may be prudent to look for the international ‘wool mark’ which indicates the quality of wool used.’
      • ‘The collection is laid back and includes well worn jeans with oversized white shirts and thick knits, masculine suits and lots of simple cotton and jersey dresses.’
      • ‘A rich palette of country greens and browns, superb knits, smooth tweeds and timelessly luxe romantic eveningwear had his super-elegant and very rich customers smiling.’
      • ‘Gap was selling beautiful cable knits for $29.’
      • ‘Instead of wearing the more conventional tie and shirt, try pairing up your suits with fine-gauge knits.’
      • ‘Think about it: a chunky woollen knit is not the first thing we reach for to ward off cold snaps and draughts these days.’
      • ‘Hanging on the wall behind him is a whole wardrobe of clothes I wouldn't buy in a million years - all velvets and turtlenecks and skin-hugging wool knits - and he says he's not here to change me.’
      • ‘Belgian designer Dries Van Noten featured chunky folk-inspired knits, while Yohji Yamamoto swathed models in huge felt coats that covered a multitude of sins.’
      • ‘But why is it that in the very same issue the clothes shown in the fashion section are bare-shouldered - admittedly with little knits to cover those parts older women prefer not to expose?’
      • ‘Mr Neal said he and his wife are planning a range of alpaca knits.’
      • ‘If you are sporting one of this season's oversized knits, then do what Stella McCartney did on her runway and wear it over slender trousers to balance out the bulk.’
      • ‘The much-loved Matelot top gets a makeover, there are lovely 30s-style chunky knits and all sorts of variations on a red, white and blue colour theme.’
      • ‘Among the large audience was special guest, Orla Kiely, the handbag designer whose displays of leather suits, boiled wool skirts and cashmere knits were also shown.’
      • ‘Of course, button-down shirts can always be worn with suits, but knits are a stylish option as well.’
      • ‘High street shops are crammed full of camel-coloured knits, trousers, coats and jackets.’
      • ‘Kathleen has always enjoyed knitting and since her grand-children decided they preferred designer labels to grandma's home knits, she has given her knitting to local charities.’
      • ‘Avoid big, bulky sweaters and select thin knits in warm dark hues like eggplant, sienna, or olive and wear them out over your jeans.’
      • ‘Separate your Ts from your long-sleeve knits, and your heavyweight sweaters from your lighter ones.’
      • ‘Look for gauzy dresses, which can be slid on top of one another, or teamed with trousers, skirts or lightweight knits.’
      • ‘The femme fatale showed off her curves in corseted cocktail frocks, clingy knits and tailored skirts.’
      knitted garment, woollen
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English cnyttan, of West Germanic origin; related to German dialect knütten, also to knot. The original sense was ‘tie in or with a knot’, hence ‘join, unite’ ( knit (sense 2 of the verb)); an obsolete Middle English sense ‘knot string to make a net’ gave rise to knit (sense 1 of the verb).

Pronunciation

knit

/nit//nɪt/