Definition of kindergarten in English:

kindergarten

Pronunciation /ˈkindərˌɡärtn//ˈkindərˌɡärdn/

noun

  • 1A school or class that prepares children for first grade. A child in kindergarten is typically 5 or 6 years old.

    • ‘Until the early 1990s, teachers in most kindergartens in Hong Kong had no official curriculum guidelines for integrating computers into the early childhood curriculum.’
    • ‘It had been her birthday party, where she had had to invite the whole kindergarten class.’
    • ‘The children, who were 7 years old, were asked to compare their new primary school experiences with those from their kindergartens.’
    • ‘When I graduated I taught kindergarten and second grade in a suburban school district.’
    • ‘Phonemic awareness can be incorporated into preschools and kindergartens in a developmentally appropriate fashion.’
    • ‘Since the late 1980s, most private kindergartens in Hong Kong have lacked government funding and have been able to afford only older, less powerful computers.’
    • ‘His dream was finally realized when the state mandated the existence of public school kindergartens in every school district.’
    • ‘There are private kindergartens or pre-schools, but first grade is the first step they take into the school they will attend for six years, and it is the beginning of academic life.’
    • ‘Audra wouldn't even be able to graduate from kindergarten, let alone high school!’
    • ‘This represented a major shift in the literacy culture of the kindergarten teachers at this school.’
    • ‘Then we invited the kindergarten classes to visit our cave and learn about the oldest paintings in the world.’
    • ‘Little Johnny was in his kindergarten class when the teacher asked the children what their fathers did for a living.’
    • ‘In North America, kindergartens are often found in large buildings, typically in the same building as primary grades.’
    • ‘She recognized kids from her kindergarten class and waved to a few as she leaned out the window.’
    • ‘Many of the earliest kindergartens in the United States served the purpose of easing the acculturation of newly arrived immigrant children.’
    • ‘Their younger schoolmates in preschool and kindergarten tied fabric scraps together.’
    • ‘Another focus of the kindergarten science curriculum is to understand weather concepts.’
    • ‘The oldest child is five now, and he's one of the brightest boys in his kindergarten class.’
    • ‘Educators have criticized the emphasis on an exclusively academic curriculum versus a play-centered and developmentally appropriate curriculum in some preschools and kindergartens.’
    • ‘I thought of the convent school in which I was educated from kindergarten to high school.’
    1. 1.1 (in Britain and Australia) an establishment where children below the age of compulsory education play and learn.

Origin

Mid 19th century: from German, literally children's garden.

Pronunciation

kindergarten

/ˈkindərˌɡärtn//ˈkindərˌɡärdn/