Main definitions of kid in English

: kid1kid2

kid1

noun

  • 1informal A child or young person.

    • ‘The balls are too heavy for smallish children, but school age and older kids are certain to enjoy the challenge.’
    • ‘We are linking in with youth organisations, going into schools and letting kids know what the initiative is about.’
    • ‘The two of us mothers were not sure if my boy kid and her girl kid would get along and go sledding while we skied, but we risked it.’
    • ‘If you went to private school before, say, 1980, it was probably because you were something of a problem child, or a kid with special needs.’
    • ‘Jenny never could relate to the problems the other kids in school had with their parents.’
    • ‘Near me was sitting a woman with two kids - a toddler girl on her lap and a boy of about three next to her.’
    • ‘Children who were allowed fun food were the cool kids at school and their lunchboxes were always higher currency for swaps.’
    • ‘I wanted to know what other kids at my school thought, particularly the girls.’
    • ‘Just because someone is a baby, a little kid, a mere youngster, doesn't mean they're not worthy of protecting, does it?’
    • ‘I used to go to Sherington school, just over the way, and there's no way that many kids were driven to school when I was a nipper.’
    • ‘The government's policy of networking all schools should help overcome this problem by targeting the kids directly.’
    • ‘If the child is unresponsive, use more parental interaction, change teachers, change schools, put the kid in special classes, whatever.’
    • ‘My teeth are clenched even thinking about kids treating Franklin the way I watched them treat the kids in my school.’
    • ‘He found it difficult to stick to the budget but more problematic was attempting to wean the kids off processed food.’
    • ‘When I was around ten years old, all the kids at school, including the boys, were getting their ears pierced.’
    • ‘Michael, then 4 and used to seeing foster kids come and go, bonded with the new baby.’
    • ‘There is a lot of interaction between boys and girls, rural kids and town kids and also the parents.’
    • ‘Grateful kids at Whitmore Infant School in Basildon have been packing into the seated area since the structure went up.’
    • ‘If the family can afford to send just one of its kids to school, it will always choose the boy child.’
    • ‘I had forgotten how much fun really tiny kids are, particularly boys.’
    child, youngster, little one, young one, baby, toddler, infant, boy, girl, young person, minor, juvenile, adolescent, teenager, youth, stripling
    offspring, daughter, son
    bairn, wean
    pickney
    kiddie, nipper, tot, tiny, kiddiewink, shaver, young 'un
    sprog
    rug rat
    ankle-biter
    brat, urchin
    babe
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Used as an informal form of address.
      ‘get going, kid!’
      • ‘I got in about a foot from his rear wheel (don't try this in traffic, kids!) and matched his speed.’
      • ‘I loathe AND detest the game - and that's all it is, kids, just a silly game.’
      • ‘I thought about claiming that as my own, but only karma wins, kids.’
      • ‘That's called making the most of concurrent annoying situations, kids.’
      • ‘Stay outa the comedy clubs, kids, you'll get eaten alive if that's your best comeback.’
      • ‘It's all about winning, kids, don't let anybody tell you different.’
      • ‘Don't leave a gap of several years between visits to the dentist, kids.’
      • ‘It just shows you, kids, don't ever sign a statement if you haven't been through it with a fine-tooth comb.’
      • ‘That's the sort of bad karma that happens to people like that, kids.’
      • ‘There are storm clouds looming just over the horizon, kids, and that can only mean one thing.’
      • ‘Beware your Little League baseball coach, kids, he may just screw up your life.’
      • ‘Bleep is cunning in making a virtue out of necessity: this is the future, kids.’
      • ‘There was the number of somebody in my office, Austin S. Don't dial the number, kids.’
      • ‘Shock news for the day is that Luke has been fired, which may or may not have something to do with his website. Watch your backs, kids.’
      • ‘Hold onto your hats, kids, it's going to be an exciting ride!’
      • ‘This is how you'll end up, kids, if you tangle with doughnuts and cough medicine.’
      • ‘Like it's ultimately gonna make a blind bit of difference, kids.’
      • ‘And remember: the less you spend, the more you can save, so go easy in those shops, kids!’
      • ‘Just remember that next time you shed a tear for the end of a transport route, kids.’
      • ‘Speaking out in America won't get you shipped off to the gulag, kids.’
  • 2A young goat.

    • ‘Within the past fortnight he and his staff have helped deliver three lambs, and six African Pygmy goat kids.’
    • ‘The family's goat kids shared the dwelling so they wouldn't freeze to death in their first winter.’
    • ‘The Tamil original is sprinkled with evocative and lovely terms like poongkuttigal for goat kids.’
    • ‘He ignored the oxen like they did not exist and treated the goat kids like they were young colts.’
    • ‘But I think the only kind of kid I could manage to have is a goat kid.’
    1. 2.1 Leather made from a young goat's skin.
      [as modifier] ‘white kid gloves’
      • ‘Fine kid leather gloves often appear among the accoutrements of fashionable ladies.’
      • ‘I pointed to a pair of wine-red kid leather Dolce & Gabbana pumps.’
      • ‘In her studio she showed us rich, Italian kid leathers, Florentine papers, artisanal glues and brushes.’
      • ‘The faces are made of silk or kid leather, molded and enhanced with embroidered or painted details.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • (of a goat) give birth.

    • ‘We are awash with a dozen kids all wanting to be bottle fed 3 times a day, new goats to milk, goats still waiting to kid and everything bored stiff and fed up standing in their pens day after day.’
    • ‘We first vaccinated the kids on the 18th April 1995, but we did not know for two years, when the goats eventually kidded whether the vaccination had worked or not, and even then they may not succumb to the disease straight away.’
    • ‘The goat will kid each year, often producing twins.’

Usage

Kid, meaning ‘child,’ although widely seen in informal contexts, should, like its casual relatives mom and dad, be avoided in formal writing

Phrases

  • kids' (also kid) stuff

    • informal A thing regarded as childishly simple or naive.

      ‘all this was kids' stuff though, compared to the directing’
      • ‘It was obvious that she loved them, but she was frustrated by her inability to be herself, which appeared to me to be a somewhat reserved type of person who wasn't very interested in kid stuff.’
      • ‘With help from our favorite athletes and coaches, we've built a game-laden plan that turns staying in shape into kid stuff.’
      • ‘For a long time, cartoons and animated features looked like kids' stuff.’
      • ‘They show that what the front office dismissed as kid stuff was, in reality, the greatest sustained burst of wit in American movie history.’
      • ‘Coincidentally… we both share the same birthday and I didn't want the people at work to believe I was still into that kid stuff.’
      • ‘He and Zoë have never really gotten along, ever since we were little and they used to fight about who would sit next to me and silly little kid stuff like that.’
      • ‘Heaven forbid that a guy likes to work or play, or that he gets distracted by adult life, or that he simply sometimes finds kid stuff boring.’
      • ‘Most people still think that video games are sophomoric kid stuff; the ones that have a narrative and emulate the movies seem more serious and, well, mature.’
      • ‘Cartoon Network won't be just kids' stuff for much longer.’
      • ‘Demographic-driven marketing isn't just kid stuff, of course.’

Origin

Middle English ( kid): from Old Norse kith, of Germanic origin; related to German Kitze.

Pronunciation:

kid

/kid/

Main definitions of kid in English

: kid1kid2

kid2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • 1 Deceive (someone) in a playful or teasing way.

    ‘you're kidding me!’
    [no object] ‘we were just kidding around’
    • ‘How I would kid him about all the air time and the praise he was getting.’
    • ‘I've been kidding him for years now that this was where he would end up.’
    • ‘He is kidded and cajoled by his three secret tormentors into approaching her at the bar and making a pitch.’
    • ‘And of course, he loved the drinking, to kid me about the drinking.’
    • ‘My dad used to kid her and tease her about it on election day.’
    • ‘Over the years, you have stayed in touch, exchanged long phone calls and birthday cards and kidded him about marrying well.’
    • ‘I saw my friend and stopped to talk for a moment, kidding him about his posh attire (suit and tie - think he must've had an interview or something).’
    • ‘I'm around other people's fathers and Ayesha's father used to tease me and Anya, Anya especially, and we kidded him right back.’
    joke, tease, jest, chaff, be facetious
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object and clause] Deceive or fool (someone)
      ‘he likes to kid everyone he's the big macho tough guy’
      ‘they kid themselves that it's still the same’
      • ‘Don't let me kid you into believing that you can develop software with the utmost ease.’
      • ‘I don't kid myself that it will be of interest to anybody but myself, so I've created another blog for the purpose.’
      • ‘If you say you're not thinking about it, you're kidding me.’
      • ‘Every time you turn a page of his autobiography, you're going, you're kidding me, this happened?’
      • ‘Everybody in the terminal - I kid you not, at least two to three hundred people - just started clapping, spontaneously.’
      • ‘Rather, feeling the need to give a reason, we invent one on the spot and kid ourselves we believe it.’
      • ‘And I will not kid myself and pretend that we shall not have more in the future.’
      • ‘We may not all put up such a front, but let's not kid ourselves; We all put up a front or façade, and some are prettier or more elaborate than others.’
      • ‘Those who say that they are willing to sacrifice their self-interest to protect yours are either kidding you, themselves, or both.’
      • ‘He was a fool to kid himself into thinking he'd made it because he was good.’
      • ‘We can try to kid ourselves into believing that following Jesus isn't such a difficult thing.’
      • ‘But let's not kid ourselves into thinking that we will be a service oriented economy for long…’
      • ‘We kid ourselves about always being philosophical or gracious in defeat, and while we can be - it is hardly carved in stone.’
      • ‘He's kidding nobody, least of all his own persecuted people.’
      • ‘We are not fools trying to kid ourselves but we want him to lead as normal a life as possible for as long as he can.’
      • ‘This is one more case where we shouldn't kid ourselves.’
      • ‘Don't kid yourself into believing this means it doesn't go on.’
      • ‘Well let us not kid ourselves - our roll of honour is not exactly bursting at the seams with feats of glorious achievement.’
      • ‘I kid myself, of course - but I like to pretend the thing brings good luck.’
      • ‘Having been beaten by Scotland, England can now stop kidding us - or was it themselves?’
      delude, deceive, fool, trick, take in, hoodwink, hoax, beguile, dupe, gull, bamboozle
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • just kidding

    • informal Used to indicate that a statement is not to be taken seriously.

      ‘I am quite ready to retire. (Just kidding!)’
  • no kidding

    • informal Used to emphasize the truth of a statement.

      ‘no kidding, she's gone’
      • ‘And, no kidding, I was given some strawberry rhubarb jam to take home as a lovely departing gift.’
      • ‘Its been a warm week and work is proving to be the ultimate test in how much heat you can tolerate while working, no kidding!’
      • ‘He activated a blue strobe light in the vent hood - no kidding - to add a sense of urgency.’
      • ‘Particularly if you're from - no kidding - Toronto.’
      • ‘Yeah, no kidding - I am a hobo, and it's pathetic.’
      • ‘I walked into a large chain bookstore in Paris while we were there, and no kidding, the whole first floor was devoted to graphic novels of one form or another.’
      • ‘There again, I read the novel, which is a trial and half, and no kidding.’
      • ‘it turns out that these people will make ice cream out of anything… including horses, cows, goats, whales, seaweed, garlic, silk, potatoes… no kidding!’
      • ‘I've only done it once, and then I slept for a week, no kidding.’
      • ‘Next week is, no kidding, National Hug-A-Vending-Machine Week.’
  • you must be (or have to be) kidding

    • informal Used to express incredulity about someone's actions or claims.

      ‘two hours to make a hot dog—you must be kidding’
      • ‘Do you think you can do all these things in 45 minutes? You must be kidding!’
      • ‘You've got to be kidding if you think this administration wants people to conserve energy.’
      • ‘You liked it? You have to be kidding me.’
      • ‘Our job is challenging at times, but when you add a couple feet of snow, it's like, you've got to be kidding me.’
      • ‘Drop the price by £ 50,000, one said. You must be kidding, I told him.’

Origin

Early 19th century: perhaps from kid, expressing the notion make a child or goat of.

Pronunciation:

kid

/kid/