Definition of keep someone/something off in US English:

keep someone/something off

phrasal verb

  • Prevent someone or something from encroaching on or touching.

    ‘keep your hands off me’
    • ‘So much good work has been done by the locals that it is vital, from now on, that all forms of litter are kept off the roadway and that the flower beds and baskets are maintained at their best.’
    • ‘It keeps kids off the streets and gives them a bit of exercise.’
    • ‘Umbrellas made as much of a style statement as hats, bags and shoes yesterday as racegoers battled to keep off the rain.’
    • ‘Large vans and lorries are kept off by a concrete and bollard bottleneck barrier.’
    • ‘Many stops along the way have no shelters whatsoever, while those available are often inadequate, with limited seating and insufficient cover to keep off a shower of rain.’
    • ‘If we persist in demonising young people - portraying them as trouble-makers who need to be kept off our streets - we shouldn't be surprised if some of them, at least, turn out to be demons.’
    • ‘The summer is when you really need centres such as this kept open as it keeps children off the streets.’
    • ‘I used to walk up and down the aisle passing sweets along the rows and making sure they kept their feet off the seats.’
    • ‘It covers the windshield keeping off ice, frost and snow sparing you from scraping your windows clean.’
    • ‘A lens cap not only guards against scratching, but also keeps off dirt and fingerprints, which can also reduce sharpness and contrast.’