Main definitions of keel in English

: keel1keel2

keel1

noun

  • 1The longitudinal structure along the centerline at the bottom of a vessel's hull, on which the rest of the hull is built, in some vessels extended downward as a blade or ridge to increase stability.

    • ‘The keel is a centreboard but not weighted; the ballast is in the hull itself (which sounds inefficient but actually works surprisingly well).’
    • ‘The full-length keel aids in directional stability as well as dampening roll and the deep forefoot helps to prevent pounding in choppy seas.’
    • ‘Unlike the other sections, the stern was much battered, showing steel ribs extending up from the keel to around a metre in height.’
    • ‘Perhaps our ancestors got confused with the songs of humpback whales amplified by the keels of their vessels.’
    • ‘Only the transom and a small section of the keel of the vessel - owned by the Coastal Forces Heritage Trust - were left.’
    • ‘A supporting structure for a mast, this can extend below the main deck, possibly even down to the keel of the ship.’
    • ‘The bolted-on steel armour has been salvaged to leave the teak hull split open along the keel.’
    • ‘At the midships section the keel is suspended above the seabed and there is plenty of space to swim through.’
    • ‘Components such as keel, engine beds, mast step, structural bulkheads and rigging loads are all connected to the grid, resulting in a very rigid and strong structure.’
    • ‘The hull was modified in 1995 to include two ventilated steps, a keel pad and notched transom.’
    • ‘His arms dove forward as, clutching the rope tightly he made for the bottom, the dark mass that was the keel of his ship blocking out the beams of light from the sun.’
    • ‘Support the keel with timber blocking to take most of the weight of the hull.’
    • ‘A diversion along the keel reveals the remains of the rudder and propshafts.’
    • ‘It's not just a keel and hull and a deck and sails.’
    • ‘The bow and stern are still intact, with amidships broken down to the keel and the wheelhouse upside-down just off the stern.’
    • ‘Again the men were coerced under once more, and made to endure yet another rake along the keel of the ship, where lurked the treacherous gatherings of barnacles.’
    • ‘There was a low scraping sound as the keel of the vessel started the drag against the sandy bottom.’
    • ‘Even nautical archaeology has made great gains, for many of the waterfront structures incorporated broken-up vessel fragments, hull planking, keels, a prow, a side rudder, ribs, a mast partner.’
    • ‘Fiberglass yachts must have a long keel with a keelhung rudder and be descended from a wooden hull design.’
    • ‘The keel is external lead fastened with stainless steel bolts.’
    base, bottom, bottom side, underside
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Zoology
      A ridge along the breastbone of many birds to which the flight muscles are attached; the carina.
      • ‘An example used by both Schmalhausen and Waddington concerns the calluses on the keels and sterna of ostriches.’
      • ‘The morphology of Archaeopteryx, with large wings and tail, but no sternal keel, and with semi-lunate carpal in the wrist, is consistent with this model.’
      • ‘M. gui's sternum didn't have a keel upon which large flight muscles could be attached.’
      • ‘Both surfaces of the wings are Oxblood Red to Dark Perilla Purple, while the keel blends from Dark Vinaceous to Pale Dull Green-yellow or White.’
      • ‘The sternum, or breastbone, bears a prominent keel where the flight muscles attach.’
      • ‘It has a distinct fold of flesh, marked by a line of hair that runs like a keel along its belly.’
    2. 1.2Botany
      A prow-shaped pair of petals present in flowers of the pea family.
      • ‘Within-flower transfer of pollen from anthers to stigma was achieved by depressing the keel petal of newly opened flowers using fine forceps.’
      • ‘The reproductive organs are enclosed within the keel petals.’
      • ‘The keel of A. priceana does not coil after tripping, instead, it bends sharply backwards at the mid-point.’
      • ‘As in other specimens of D. zenos, a ventral keel is not present.’
    3. 1.3literary A ship.

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 (of a boat or ship) turn over on its side; capsize.

    • ‘It proved the final blow for the Neptune; the ship slowly keeled over and sank.’
    • ‘The French navy was the most significant victim of this period of experimentation and had lost several ships which had keeled over and sank due to design faults.’
    • ‘On the 28th of August 1791, the HMS Pandora sank off the northern coast of Australia when she had hit a reef, keeled over and sank.’
    • ‘Some of the boats keel over and sink, spilling pilgrims and fuel into the harbour.’
    • ‘Finally in October, it became obvious that they were going to lose the ship as it had keeled over, and was listing to port.’
    • ‘After being given a crash-course in rowing, my first hurdle was to get into the boat without it keeling over.’
    capsize, turn turtle, turn upside down, turn topsy-turvy, founder, list, heel over, lean over
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1informal (of a person or thing) fall over; collapse.
      • ‘But I'm also trying not to just keel over and topple onto the carpet.’
      • ‘But had Ganguly keeled over early on, so would have his side.’
      • ‘But if the share price keels over, you'll be grateful you have restricted stock.’
      • ‘Soon enough we were in the hallway, keeling over holding our sides.’
      • ‘Suddenly there's a gun shot, and the man keels over.’
      • ‘Shortly after mating, the male usually keels over and dies.’
      • ‘He dropped to his knees and keeled over sideways as blood spouted from the side of his head like a drinking fountain.’
      • ‘Maurice Walker, who lives nearby, said: ‘The lead coach is over on the shore side, it's keeled over and separated entirely from the rest.’’
      • ‘Drew has keeled over to one side of the sofa and is laughing hysterically into the cushions.’
      • ‘I crossed to the other side and found Ewen keeled over on the ground.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse kjǫlr, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation:

keel

/kēl/

Main definitions of keel in English

: keel1keel2

keel2

noun

British
  • A flat-bottomed freight boat; a keelboat.

    • ‘The earliest recorded use of Keels for transporting coal on the Tyne is in the early 1300's.’
    • ‘The original Tyne keel was clinker-built but later types were of carvel build.’

Origin

Middle English: from Middle Low German kēl, Middle Dutch kiel ship, boat.

Pronunciation:

keel

/kēl/