Definition of kawaii in English:

kawaii

Pronunciation: /kəˈwī//ˈkäwīˌē/

adjective

  • (in the context of Japanese popular culture) cute.

    ‘she paints elephants that are extremely kawaii’
    • ‘Other common symbols of her blight include the pronouncement in public of such words as "kawaii" and following everyone's name with " san ".’
    • ‘The exhibit also examines how the "kawaii," or cute imagery predominant in Japanese pop culture, has been corrupted by some artists through sexual and violent content.’
    • ‘Fun for when I'm bored and end up exchanging "kawaii" emails with coworkers on the weekends but simply a waste.’
    • ‘Breathtakingly kitsch to the outsider, many Japanese would simply utter an awestruck "kawaii!"’
    • ‘The shojo and kawaii (cute) culture are commonly associated with consumerism, with the regressive tendency to escape from social realities, at best with a passive resistance to social norms.’
    • ‘These characters frequently bear expressions of mindless petulance, as if adult emotions of rage and frustration were seething beneath their all too kawaii surface.’
    • ‘The kitschy cuteness of kawaii (cute) consumer culture, so well documented by Sharon Kinsella in her article, " Cuties in Japan ", surfaces in several Miyazaki texts.’
    • ‘One of the most ubiquitous examples of kawaii is Hello Kitty, a mouthless, expressionless, large-headed kitten that emblazons lunch boxes, T-shirts, wallpaper and coffee mugs.’
    • ‘The first is kawaii, or cuteness.’
    • ‘The effeminate star has made a name for himself over the last couple of years and is considered the epitome of "kawaii" by Japanese women.’
    • ‘I thought that story was so kawaii and really wanted to read more!’
    • ‘I wanted to make them pretty and kawaii.’
    • ‘"Japan is the world capital of kawaii [ cuteness ]," explains Guy Murphy of the Bartle Bogle Hegarty ad agency in Singapore.’
    • ‘If Hello Kitty and Pikachu are the epitome of kawaii, then the art of Yoshitomo Nara is the anti-kawaii.’
    • ‘Kawaii seems to serve as a shield against maturity, adult responsibility and sexual desire; it was often mixed with objects that simultaneously reference more adult themes.’
    • ‘Though my first thought was it better not be like the 1,000,000 + views of the white girl looking kawaii and not saying a thing.’
    • ‘Brainwashed with a craving for Western consumer goods the need to possess foreign brand names, as well as kawaii objects, has become a national obsession, especially amongst teenage girls.’
    • ‘The cat was so cute, kawaii!’
    • ‘Lee and I gave my Dad a Settlers of Catan travel set for his birthday, which is so kawaii.’
    • ‘Hitherby pushes open the door and peeks a bit of cloud with a particularly kawaii eye through theopening.’

noun

  • The quality of being cute, or items that are cute.

    ‘even in a cosmopolitan city like Tokyo, kawaii is everywhere’
    • ‘The shojo and kawaii (cute) culture are commonly associated with consumerism, with the regressive tendency to escape from social realities, at best with a passive resistance to social norms.’
    • ‘They went gaga over everything kawaii.’
    • ‘Murakami uses the term to explain and critique the stubborn two-dimensionality of anime, manga and Japanese art, and Japan's kawaii (cute) consumer culture.’
    • ‘Japan is the world capital of kawaii [ cuteness ], explains Guy Murphy of the Bartle Bogle Hegarty ad agency in Singapore.’
    • ‘The most important thing in selling to girls is kawaii, or cuteness.’
    • ‘Kawaii seems to serve as a shield against maturity, adult responsibility and sexual desire; it was often mixed with objects that simultaneously reference more adult themes.’
    • ‘Other common symbols of her blight include the pronouncement in public of such words as "kawaii" and following everyone's name with " san ".’

Origin

Japanese.

Pronunciation:

kawaii

/kəˈwī//ˈkäwīˌē/