Definition of jute in English:

jute

noun

  • 1Rough fiber made from the stems of a tropical Old World plant, used for making twine and rope or woven into sacking or matting.

    • ‘People now use reusable bags, commonly woven from jute, creating another industry with associated economic benefit.’
    • ‘I go back and find some odd things like rope and natural jute twine packaged for the crafts market.’
    • ‘This information will show whether it is profitable for a farmer to produce fibre from kenaf and jute,’ he said.’
    • ‘Fabrics with 60 per cent cotton, 20 per cent jute and 20 per cent silk give a silky finish and are suited for all occasions.’
    • ‘This superfine cloth comes from our own traditional handlooms woven out of natural fibres like cotton, linen, silk, wool, jute, etc. and soaked in natural dyes.’
    • ‘Then, like magpies, they hurry back to their workshop loaded with wisps of lace and coils of steel mesh, strands of silk and ropes of jute.’
    • ‘There were different weaves in jute and blends of jute with cotton and silk.’
    • ‘About 200 yardages produced with natural fibres like cotton, wool, silk, and jute in natural dyes and the different structures using different counts of yarn are being displayed in the show.’
    • ‘In fact, the cloth made of cotton, silk, and jute has lovely shades of mauve, brown, blue, and white.’
    • ‘The jute and silk blended saris, available at some shops such as Nalli's, are eco-friendly; they come in double shades or light colours.’
  • 2The herbaceous plant that is cultivated for jute fiber, with edible young shoots.

    • ‘The major crops are rice, jute, wheat, tea, sugarcane, and vegetables.’
    • ‘There's also a freezer full of such frozen goods as okra, cut pigs' feet, snails, jute leaves, hot peppers, red snapper, and hard chicken.’
    • ‘This is more so in the case of small & medium Farmers who are involved in conventional cultivation of common products like rice, wheat, coconut, jute or sugar cane.’
    • ‘Some paper, however, is made from such plants as cotton, rice, wheat, cornstalks, hemp, and jute; very high quality ‘rag’ paper is still derived from cotton rags.’
    • ‘The prices of jute, potato, soyabean, cashew nut, pepper, rubber, green tea leaves, coconut, groundnut and coffee have fallen sharply.’
    • ‘Natural products from jute and banana fibre are being promoted with much hype, especially in urban setups where there is a demand for anything biodegradable.’
    1. 2.1 Used in names of other plants that yield fiber, e.g., Chinese jute.
      • ‘The Chinese jute growing and manufacturing industry reached its zenith in 1985.’
      • ‘Gunny bags account for about 90 percent of the total production of Chinese juteand kenaf textile mills.’
      • ‘For the Sahara Cup, it was the Chinese jute cap, T-shirt, chinos, towel set and socks; for the McDowells event, it will be a leather pouch for golf balls and a leather wallet.’

Origin

Mid 18th century: from Bengali jhūṭo, from Prakrit juṣṭi.

Pronunciation:

jute

/jo͞ot/

Definition of Jute in English:

Jute

noun

  • A member of a Germanic people that may have come from Jutland and, according to the Venerable Bede, joined the Angles and Saxons in invading Britain in the 5th century, settling in a region including Kent and the Isle of Wight.

    • ‘The Jutes settled in and near Kent, but the dialect for the region is known as Kentish, not Jutish.’
    • ‘I would suggest that concentration on teaching the Romans, Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Normans in Britain is more likely to achieve her objective.’
    • ‘The collapse of Roman rule in the early fifth century ended urban life, as groups of Germanic Angles, Jutes, and Saxons carved the country into tribal enclaves and later created the heptarchy.’
    • ‘Across the North Sea, new Germanic tribes were settling: Angles, Jutes, Saxons.’
    • ‘Angles, Saxons, Jutes, and Frisians who settled in England were still imbued with the traditional freedom of primitive German society.’
    • ‘Compared to Beowulf, we are told that Hermod was treacherous, exiled along with the Jutes.’
    • ‘The Jutes settled in Kent, the Saxons in Essex, Sussex, Middlesex and Wessex, and the Angles everywhere else.’
    • ‘I have always understood the Angles, Saxons and Jutes were Germanic tribes who moved to Britain following the retreat of the Roman Empire.’
    • ‘The area is recorded as being the site where the Britons fought the Jutes at the Battle of Creganford in 457.’
    • ‘Britain is a mongrel country of Britons, Celts, Scots, Picts, Romans, Angles, Saxons, Jutes, Vikings, Normans, Jews, Huguenots, members of the Empire and Commonwealth, and many more groups.’

Origin

Old English Eotas, Iotas, influenced later in spelling by medieval Latin Jutae, Juti.

Pronunciation:

Jute

/jo͞ot/