Definition of jurisprudence in US English:

jurisprudence

noun

  • 1The theory or philosophy of law.

    • ‘Perhaps so, if the present masters of jurisprudence in the law schools and on the courts are in unchallengeable control.’
    • ‘The whole course of this area of jurisprudence is that similar functions can be discharged both on an executive basis and a judicial basis.’
    • ‘After the war, he earned a doctorate in jurisprudence from the Brooklyn Law School.’
    • ‘Further, the overwhelming body of international jurisprudence favours the application of a subjective test.’
    • ‘In terms of legal analysis, you can argue plausibly that all I have done is to apply in large measure well-established jurisprudence.’
    • ‘For the others, he was majoring in archaeology and forensics, and I was taking courses in law and jurisprudence.’
    • ‘This reliance on custom over jurisprudence was evident in Nazma's case.’
    • ‘Finally, the development of European Human Rights Law engages some of the most basic issues of jurisprudence.’
    • ‘This is obviously against Islam's own well-established principles of jurisprudence and legislation.’
    • ‘And in the realm of equity jurisprudence, he is attuned to making the common law make sense.’
    • ‘It involves concepts described as grounds - that is jurisprudence.’
    • ‘For the Muslim Brothers, the Sharia is the sole source of legislation and jurisprudence.’
    • ‘Furthermore, much jurisprudence had accumulated regarding the interpretation of the offences punishable in terms of the new Statute.’
    • ‘Born in Lisbon, he studied history, philosophy, and jurisprudence at the University of Lisbon.’
    • ‘Only Richard Hooker can count as a precursor, and then merely in one limited branch of philosophy, that of jurisprudence.’
    • ‘It is not my intention to review the relevant jurisprudence in this ruling.’
    • ‘That is what we call jurisprudence, it is the philosophy and decision-making that underlies our legal system.’
    • ‘However, more recent jurisprudence demonstrates a judicial resistance towards slavish adherence to that rule.’
    • ‘That vision informs much of the court's jurisprudence from the 1880s onward.’
    • ‘The term ‘criminal offence’ under Convention jurisprudence has an autonomous meaning.’
    law, body of laws, constitution, rules, rulings, regulations, acts, bills, statutes, enactments, charters, ordinances, measures, canon, code
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    1. 1.1 A legal system.
      ‘American jurisprudence’
      • ‘We turn to consider the Strasbourg jurisprudence.’
      • ‘In fact, Michigan started the downward trend in takings jurisprudence.’
      • ‘In a democratic country like India, there is a well-defined Constitution, jurisprudence and other laws.’
      • ‘The third commandment also historically shaped American law and jurisprudence.’
      • ‘The Strasbourg jurisprudence is clear and consistent.’
      • ‘This is a topic which highlights some of the difficulties which are created if the claimants' views of European jurisprudence are right.’
      • ‘I would add that in European jurisprudence and in domestic practice this is a strong rule.’
      • ‘The jurisprudence of capital punishment imposes a tremendous burden on jurors.’
      • ‘It comes out of the human rights jurisprudence in Europe.’
      • ‘Supreme Court jurisprudence on journalist privileges has been both limited and confusing.’
      • ‘It is inconsistent with our jurisprudence, it is inconsistent with that of other common law countries.’
      • ‘We must convince our legislators to place roadblocks in the almost criminal misuse of American jurisprudence.’
      • ‘The right to life has been a fruitful source of environmental jurisprudence in several national jurisdictions, especially India.’
      • ‘Is there any apt analogies with our thinking about the common law or European jurisprudence at all?’
      • ‘The approach under the Strasbourg jurisprudence and under English domestic law is the same.’
      • ‘I would have thought that Gazzo was a conspicuous page in the Court's jurisprudence…’
      • ‘Surely, there is some useful text on the European jurisprudence.’
      • ‘In American jurisprudence this is called judicial legislation.’
      • ‘The developing jurisprudence in relation to Article 6 suggests that a reasoned decision is a concomitant to a fair hearing.’
      • ‘Well, it would be in a whole new jurisprudence so far as the prosecution of Commonwealth offences were concerned in this country.’
      law, laws, body of law, rules, regulations, constitution, system, charter, canon
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century: from late Latin jurisprudentia, from Latin jus, jur- ‘law’ + prudentia ‘knowledge’.

Pronunciation

jurisprudence

/ˌdʒʊrəˈsprudns//ˌjo͝orəˈspro͞odns/