Main definitions of junk in English

: junk1junk2

junk1

noun

  • 1informal Old or discarded articles that are considered useless or of little value.

    • ‘Sometimes, nothing works and the result is a pile of useless junk.’
    • ‘One room was full of junk, and one was the bathroom.’
    • ‘After they vanished, the basement was still full of junk metal and glass.’
    • ‘In theory, it should mean no calls from that phone will be accepted - making the handset a useless piece of junk.’
    • ‘You can hardly enter or leave the Royal Garden Plaza without tripping over someone's junk or having useless articles thrust into your face.’
    • ‘You rummage through piles of junk in the hopes of finding a gem amongst the detritus.’
    • ‘Hey, you'd be surprised at the useless junk people will buy for a buck.’
    • ‘He can also remember car number plates off pat and his room is full of junk that he can take apart, examine and rebuild.’
    • ‘Can you believe this elegant gown was once discarded as junk?’
    • ‘Most were thieves or assassins but others were there to make good money off of their useless junk.’
    • ‘Only in Canada… do we leave cars worth thousands of dollars in the driveway and put our useless junk in the garage.’
    • ‘I was sorting out the books on Beth's bookshelves to make more room for our junk when I found her copy of the highway code.’
    • ‘Vanessa did the digging with a trowel, discarding obvious junk and storing everything else in plastic buckets for later examination.’
    • ‘One thing it does require is that rooftops be cleared of junk or garbage that might block sunlight - an added environmental benefit.’
    • ‘The paint was peeling, many of the rooms were cluttered with junk and the whole place looked sorry for itself.’
    • ‘Any other plastics have to be discarded as junk.’
    • ‘Only old junk and useless metal compartments were still around.’
    • ‘You take your useless junk and list it, and if someone wants it, you send it to them instead of putting it out with the trash.’
    • ‘With everything put away, and relatively all garbage, junk, and useless things in their respective places, there was only one more thing to do.’
    • ‘So a few weeks ago, the two astronauts who live there tossed out some useless junk, like so many old hubcaps for the trash heap.’
    useless things, discarded things, rubbish, clutter, stuff, odds and ends, bits and pieces, bric-a-brac, oddments, flotsam and jetsam, white elephants
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Worthless writing, talk, or ideas.
      ‘I can't write this kind of junk’
      • ‘A large percentage of information encountered is clearly useless - junk e - mail, for example.’
      • ‘I think the Internet has still got a strong element of co-operation when you delve beyond all the useless junk and corporate machinery.’
      • ‘The puzzling question has been why there would be long stretches of junk or nonsense DNA in the genome.’
      • ‘It's just that stuff with princes and princesses and junk.’
      • ‘It's not that hard to make money - and it is worth it if it frees you from a poisonous environment which is turning your output into unreadable junk which has no value.’
      • ‘I don't want games, I don't want fiddling around, one-night-stand junk, etc.’
      • ‘But also I wasn't going to put my name on a piece of junk.’
      • ‘More often than not the shelves are stuffed with worthless junk, the typical used copies of the mindless drivel produced by most American game manufacturers.’
      • ‘If you think this is worthless junk, wait until I post all my high school poetry!’
      • ‘For the email, set up a filter for the addresses that sends his junk straight to the trash.’
      • ‘Junk lawsuits are expensive for doctors and hospitals to fight in court.’
      • ‘Have you ever tried to do marketing research, only to realize that 9 out of 10 articles are junk?’
      • ‘This process argument is distinct from the substantive argument about whether peer-review reduces the amount of junk in law reviews.’
      • ‘What kind of president will be elected by the new generation that has effectively discarded conscience as old junk?’
      • ‘This newspaper does not lack ephemeral junk articles.’
      • ‘When my telephone line was activated I received many junk calls and fax machine sounds when I answered my phone.’
      • ‘I also hear the excuse that there is ‘too much junk in gun magazines.’’
      • ‘To combat this, direct mailers will do anything to get you to open their junk, no matter how dishonest.’
      • ‘And precious bandwidth is being eaten up by this worthless junk.’
      • ‘Too often the process of dumbing down is associated with the expansion of junk television and trash entertainment.’
    2. 1.2 A person's belongings, equipment, or baggage.
      ‘I only have an hour to get all my junk together’
    3. 1.3Finance Junk bonds.
      ‘he invested in junk’
      • ‘Corporate debt performed well, with junk spreads narrowing significantly.’
      • ‘It is our view that the relative poor performance of U.S. junk and corporate debt issues provides clear and ominous portents for the coming cycle downturn.’
      • ‘Corporate spreads generally narrowed, with junk performing well.’
      • ‘Corporate bonds were mixed, with investment grade performing well and junk appearing vulnerable.’
      • ‘If the hedge funds shun European junk, that dramatic shift could drive up rates on these securities even further.’
  • 2informal Heroin.

    • ‘Sasha, do normal people inject junk into their veins?’
    • ‘Also if I had had some sober time and took a shot of junk, I immediately began spiralling down into the dope slavery of everyday use.’
    • ‘Bettie, now preferring the name Marilyn, had been on and off of heroin for years now but it was the first junk needle Callahan had let near her.’
    • ‘Even heroin can be used recreationally; believe it or not, creating a junk habit takes time, money and a whole lot of junk.’
    • ‘Many of them were in the process of shooting junk into their veins from stained needles.’
  • 3The lump of oily fibrous tissue in a sperm whale's head, containing spermaceti.

    • ‘Oil is contained in the spermaceti organ and in the spermaceti bodies of the junk.’
    • ‘Oil of the first quality (spermaceti) is found in the case and junk chambers in the head and was sometimes stored separately from oil.’
  • 4US vulgar slang A man's genitals.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • Discard or abandon unceremoniously.

    ‘sort out what could be sold off and junk the rest’
    • ‘We got some of it done then, but we junked it.’
    • ‘Despite its good-looking veneer, its breakneck pace, its daisy-chain of expert set-pieces, some crucial logic or motive appears to have been junked along the way.’
    • ‘That will open the way for the White House to eventually propose junking the whole system in favor of a consumption tax, he predicts.’
    • ‘It is also seen in junking his prejudice towards the US alliance and his outline of a more realistic foreign policy.’
    • ‘In July, everyone held their breath as the Bank of Japan met to consider junking its 18-month-old zero interest-rate policy.’
    • ‘It junked a proposal to allow for-profit hospitals.’
    • ‘But I would secretly engage a cleaner forthwith, having junked my objections.’
    • ‘The General Insurance Association has thrown the ball back in the court of the four companies after junking its empanelment of third party administrators.’
    • ‘I have the luxury now of being able to spend a few days doing something pleasant and then junking the result, taking my joy from the doing rather than from the product.’
    • ‘You can also email media advisories, but avoid attachments; emails with attachments may be junked automatically to avoid viruses.’
    • ‘So part of the essay attempts to identify the sort of praise and blame that can be practised in a dispassionate and clear-headed way, while junking the rest.’
    • ‘The automakers were of the view that 10-year-old commercial vehicles and 15-year-old personal vehicles should be junked.’
    • ‘They're stupid policies and deserve to be junked.’
    • ‘It is for sure that the old framework has been junked.’
    • ‘This stuff was going to be junked and in a sense I memorialised it.’
    • ‘Barbara Castle's imaginative plan to connect the state pension to earnings was junked.’
    • ‘Now, apparently, our flat is worth almost double what we paid for it… in just two years… after just junking the old carpets and adding fresh paint?’
    • ‘South and west of this line people live by marginal agriculture and off archaic industries, such as fixing old cars and later junking them.’
    • ‘Some were simply transmitted live without anyone bothering to record them, while others, which were recorded, were then junked in order to save space or re-use expensive tape.’
    • ‘I think the color-coded system should be junked.’
    throw away, throw out, discard, get rid of, dispose of, scrap, toss out, jettison, dispense with
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting an old or inferior rope): of unknown origin. junk (sense 1 of the noun) dates from the mid 19th century.

Pronunciation

junk

/dʒəŋk//jəNGk/

Main definitions of junk in English

: junk1junk2

junk2

noun

  • A flat-bottomed sailing vessel typical in China and the East Indies, with a prominent stem, a high stern, and lugsails.

    • ‘It's a poor fishing village where the people live in sampans and junks.’
    • ‘Of those that reached the shores of Formosa and splashed through the water to the junks, we hurried to untie the ships and rowed fiercely regardless of the winds.’
    • ‘The hotel bar has incredible views over the harbour, past the flotilla of sampans, junks and cargo ships, to the jumble of skyscrapers which make up the Central district of Hong Kong island.’
    • ‘Though hovercrafts and high-speed jetfoils have crowded out ancient sampans and junks, fishing thrives and fish remains as significant an input in the Chinese culinary tradition as before.’
    • ‘A century before Columbus and his fellow Europeans began to make their way to the new world, fleets of giant Chinese junks carried porcelains, lacquerware, copper coins, and silks far and wide.’
    • ‘There is some evidence for development of robust, high-seas sailing junks in China by thirteenth century AD.’
    • ‘Heavily armed clippers, any one of which could have dealt with a whole fleet of Chinese war junks, were spreading opium up the entire Chinese coast.’
    • ‘The ships, huge junks nearly five hundred feet long and built from the finest teak, were under the command of Emperor Zhu Di's loyal eunuch admirals.’
    • ‘After four months of intense training, Pak, Malcom and 118 partisans boarded four junks and set sail for the mainland.’
    • ‘Also the junks brought artisans and tradespeople to the Islands.’
    • ‘It was built in 1646 with materials brought in bat-winged junks from China and is the oldest Chinese Temple in Malaysia.’
    • ‘One supporter was Zheng Cheng-gong, also known as Koxinga, a half-Japanese supporter of the Mings, who led an army of 100,000 troops and 3,000 junks.’
    • ‘The Chinese had discovered much earlier, around the 5th century ad, that scurvy at sea could be avoided by carrying live ginger plants on board junks.’
    • ‘China found itself up against the fruits of the British Industrial Revolution, pitting junks against steam warships.’
    • ‘Shipping was the era's celebrated industry, and Shanghai was an artery for the silk and tea that flowed between the Orient and the West on full-masted junks and swollen clippers.’
    • ‘Her squadrons were kept busy flying combat air patrols over inshore forces, strafing mine-laying junks, and supporting troops ashore.’
    • ‘In this they closely resembled the Apollo project, begun 540 years after the great junks had sailed from Beijing.’
    • ‘From junks to dhows, clippers to cruise liners, humble riverboats to awesome battlefleets, this is the definitive chronicle of great vessels, legendary journeys, and heroic seafarers.’
    • ‘This trade became regularized by the 1640s, with Chinese junks bringing the product to Batavia (modern Jakarta), where it was purchased by the Dutch and shipped by them to Holland.’
    • ‘The most stylish party nowadays would be one held on a yacht, reminiscent of historic entertainment on royal boats or magnificent junks.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from obsolete French juncque or Portuguese junco, from Malay jong, reinforced by Dutch jonk.

Pronunciation

junk

/dʒəŋk//jəNGk/