Definition of join in English:



  • 1 Link; connect.

    ‘the tap was joined to a pipe’
    ‘join the paragraphs together’
    • ‘The promontory, jammed with red-tiled roofs, was once an island, but had for centuries been joined to the mainland by a narrow causeway.’
    • ‘"I thought you two were joined at the hip, " Andy said.’
    • ‘Alaska and Hawaii are not joined to the other forty-eight states.’
    • ‘The drawer fronts are normally joined to the drawer sides with lapped dovetails.’
    • ‘"We're not joined at the hip, " Noah said in response.’
    • ‘The entrance through the outer ramparts was joined to the inner gateway by an ingeniously defended approach.’
    • ‘They climb up on the shed at the back of the boarded up house, which is joined to ours.’
    • ‘The capillary sprouts eventually join together to form a new network, with arterioles supplying them and venules draining them.’
    • ‘The extension would be joined to the main offices by a link corridor.’
    • ‘Believers are one with each other because they are joined to Christ.’
    • ‘The convent, on the longitudinal axis, is joined to the Basilica by one of its short sides.’
    • ‘The sewer's original standard of design is described as ‘poor’, and it has never been joined to the public sewer system.’
    • ‘It will be joined to the existing town of Cloughjordan by a pathway.’
    • ‘For two guys literally joined at the hip, they lead very different lives.’
    • ‘The paintings have been joined to form one montage, which has been put up in the school hall.’
    • ‘Then Ranginui, the sky, dwelt with Papatuanuku, the earth, and was joined to her, and land was made.’
    • ‘The sphere of thought was joined to that of action, and the philosophy of Francis Bacon exemplifies the resultant outlook.’
    • ‘We then switch to a fellow listening to the music in his car, which is joined to another by some sort of tubing.’
    • ‘The motorway will eventually be joined to a southern route from Dublin to Rosslare.’
    • ‘Two lower staterooms will be joined to make one large master suite.’
    connect, unite, fix, affix, attach, add, annex, fasten, stick, glue, fuse, knit, weld, amalgamate, consolidate, combine, bond, append, link, bridge, secure, lock, make fast, tie, bind, string, lash, couple, marry, pair, yoke, team, chain, merge, dovetail, splice, blend
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    1. 1.1Become linked or connected to.
      ‘where the River Drave joins the Danube’
      • ‘For this reason, I always travelled first to Manchester and then joined up with the main group of reds.’
      meet, touch, reach, extend to, abut, adjoin
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    2. 1.2Connect (points) with a line.
      ‘join up the points in a different color’
      • ‘The construction involves joining some points and drawing through some of the points of intersection lines parallel to other lines.’
      • ‘For example it is assumed that there is a unique line joining any two points.’
      • ‘By joining the points of intersection between price and amount of X consumed at that price, we trace out a demand curve.’
      • ‘The triangle joining points 3, 6 and 9 links all the numbers on the circle divisible by 3.’
      • ‘There are three lines joining points of the configuration that do not count among the four configuration lines.’
      • ‘In particular he assumed that the solids were convex, that is a straight line joining any two points always lies entirely within the solid.’
      • ‘There is only one parabola joining these three points.’
      • ‘When all pairs of points are joined, the resulting network of points and lines is known as a complete graph.’
    3. 1.3[no object]Unite to form one entity or group.
      ‘they joined up with local environmentalists’
      ‘countries join together to abolish restrictions on trade’
      • ‘We'll join together to celebrate Samoa, her culture and her prayerful faith.’
      • ‘Instead of hitting each other and bouncing off like bumper cars, the atoms join together and function as one entity.’
      • ‘Three Blackburn schools are to join together to allow children from different backgrounds to make new friends.’
      • ‘Dozens of businesses are set to join together to spruce up an historic Bradford tourist attraction.’
      • ‘Residents from Bennekerry and Browneshill were the first to join together to oppose a bypass through the area.’
      • ‘It is the time of year when families join together to visit the final resting place of their loved one.’
      • ‘Men and women of no particular faith or god can and do join in matrimony.’
      • ‘Not long after, they were joined in holy matrimony.’
      • ‘They are competing in terms of business but will join together when it will help to bring about benefits for retail across the board.’
      • ‘Schools will be able to join together as education ‘brands’, with the best heads encouraged to take over whole groups.’
      • ‘When the religious-right and the humanists join together for a common cause, no external entity can put down their efforts.’
      • ‘Many thousands of couples were joined in matrimony during communal ceremonies.’
      • ‘Let us join together to buy it by private purchase.’
      • ‘Digital images of the drops were recorded as they joined to form one drop.’
      • ‘You could also join up with another group in the area to raise funds between you.’
      • ‘So this is another one of those opportunities that we all have to join together.’
      • ‘Most coalitions were brothers, but unrelated males could also join up to form coalitions.’
      • ‘Both groups then joined together in a revolt against Dutch rule.’
      • ‘Community is built and strengthened as participants join together to work as the body of Christ.’
      • ‘If the two nations join together and live in peace, they will set an example for the rest of the world.’
    4. 1.4Become a member or employee of.
      ‘she joined the department last year’
      • ‘One of them joins the band, wearing a high-tech washboard, which he plays with spoons.’
      • ‘You take the control of Glitch, a small yellow robot who joins a resistance band of droids fighting off an evil army of robots.’
      • ‘I would join what is known as the simplicity movement.’
      • ‘The above is an attempt to highlight those questions that I felt are specific to joining a startup.’
      • ‘We never sounded better so part of me was glad that this guy was joining our band.’
      • ‘Instructions for joining and information about the GDP can be found on their web site.’
      • ‘Aviva joins a growing band of hard-pressed life insurance companies putting the slide rule over their Irish operations in a bid to cut costs.’
      • ‘Smith was a talented violinist herself and joined what is now the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra as a professional musician.’
      • ‘Flores will join fellow Gates Scholars from across the world this October to pursue her graduate degree in engineering.’
      • ‘In fact joining the band had taken all my courage.’
      • ‘But despite such challenges, women are once again joining the ranks of the police in Afghanistan.’
      • ‘Michigan recently became the latest state to join what we like to call the " victim empowerment " movement.’
      • ‘Most members join clubs for fitness, but they stay for fun.’
      • ‘Think " retention " the moment the member joins the club.’
      • ‘Well, he asked me if I wanted to sign on the dotted line and join his band of merry men.’
      • ‘Many farmers had joined the army under Thomas Rusk's command.’
      • ‘Once the musician has joined a band, new types of connections are formed.’
      • ‘I joined the army late 1939 when I was twenty years old.’
      • ‘Additionally, a larger number of students participate by joining the band or the cheerleading squad, two spin-off benefits of football.’
      • ‘If you decide that court life isn't for you, would you consider joining my band?’
    5. 1.5Take part in.
      ‘I joined the demonstration’
      [no object] ‘I joined in and sang along’
      • ‘Her biggest excitement, though, was hearing her guests join lustily in the choruses.’
      • ‘"What's going on, " Sitka asked, joining in the conversation.’
      • ‘The tables soon filled with guests who heartily joined in the festivities.’
      • ‘There are ten of thousands of people here joining in the celebration.’
      • ‘I remember joining in the singing and general festivities of the Jubilee holiday.’
      • ‘Mr Hendricks will be travelling over from the US to join in the celebrations.’
      • ‘Hundreds of light aircraft pilots joined in the celebration by flying to the airport.’
      • ‘Our hotels have joined in the fun, too, with special summer rates.’
      • ‘Jeremy and his friends will be joining a city band competition next month.’
      • ‘The staff's friends and family are joining in the fun, too.’
      • ‘They enthusiastically joined the reunion and exchanged ideas, later joining in the singing.’
      • ‘Now that the established industry players are joining the fray, the competition will only intensify.’
      • ‘Many regular evening walkers rushed into the grass lawns and joined in the singing.’
      • ‘Producers, writers and other members of the Heartbeat team also joined in the fun.’
      • ‘China, despite their presently weak technology, will soon join the fray.’
      • ‘Close to 2,000 more people quickly joined the fray.’
      • ‘Not even the quietest in the group could help but join in the festivities.’
      • ‘I laughed and told them to come on back anytime and join in the festivities.’
      • ‘"Me neither, " Adele mused wanting to join in the conversation.’
      become a member of, help in, participate in, join in, get involved in, contribute to, have a hand in
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    6. 1.6[no object]Become a member of the armed forces.
      ‘her brothers joined up in 1914’
      • ‘He had been one of the Blackbury Pals, who had joined up together.’
      • ‘After joining up in 1998, Cpl Fox served in Germany and in Kosovo as an intelligence and security clerk with the Queen's Royal Hussars.’
      • ‘SF representative, Gerry Kelly, said the party would continue campaigning to discourage young nationalists or Catholics from joining up.’
      • ‘There will be no joining up after we have the battle won.’
      • ‘She said: ‘If friends or people who I speak to in the street tell me they know somebody who's thinking of joining up I talk them out of it.’’
      • ‘They even joined up together on the same day, one in the navy, the other in the air force.’
      • ‘Well done to those who took the initiative and joined up - more members welcome.’
      • ‘But I do not see joining up with the Brownshirts as something to be glossed over in order to make the greater point of opposing Chinese imperialism.’
      • ‘They would like to see new members joining up - all the officer posts are up for re-election.’
      • ‘One of the ways to get a culturally - aware police service is by persuading more members of the ethnic minorities to join up.’
      enlist, join
      enrol in, sign up for, volunteer for
      take the king's shilling
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    7. 1.7Come into the company of.
      ‘after the show we were joined by Jessica's sister’
      • ‘Many of our friends and supporters will be joining me to walk at various stages along the route.’
      • ‘He will be joined on stage at the Sedbergh gig by his Big Band.’
      • ‘The band, which was great in itself, was joined onstage by a couple of famous singers.’
      • ‘But what difference did it make if he was unable to play or join them on-stage?’
      • ‘We'll have reaction from some of those family members joining us here live, tonight.’
      • ‘At the play's curtain, Jefferson invites director Moises Kaufman and me to join him onstage.’
      • ‘They will be joined on stage by singers from Silsden Singers and Bradford Voices.’
      • ‘CNN's Patty Davis now joins us live from Washington with more on this.’
      • ‘CNN's Kathleen Koch now joins us live from the courthouse with more reaction from there - Kathleen.’
      • ‘Two of the best political journalists in the country join me next.’
      • ‘A U.S. congressman who supported Irish nationalism joins us to talk about it straight ahead.’
      • ‘Three of the country's very best political journalists join me next.’
    8. 1.8Support (someone) in an activity.
      ‘I am sure you will join me in wishing him every success’
      • ‘I urge you to join us in sending food, warm wishes and support to the Israeli soldiers.’
      • ‘Giblets has joined me to contribute moral support in my hour of hunger striking.’
      • ‘I can scarcely leave my house without her joining me in whatever activity I am doing.’
      • ‘Earlier this year I joined him to announce support for Scotland's first two football academies.’
      • ‘We hope you will join us in supporting religious freedom in France.’
      • ‘They are joined in this good wish by Jimmy's neighbours, and his many friends in the community.’
      • ‘If you need extra encouragement, join an evening class or find a friend who wants to join you in some new activity.’
      • ‘His request to the supporters of his contention is to join him at least for a mile or a few yards to strengthen the nation.’


  • A place or line where two or more things are connected or fastened together.

    • ‘To see writer, director, actor and designers working together so perfectly that one cannot see the joins is a rare treat.’
    • ‘If you have to break out of the bottom, most of the time the knot to the boom will go before the superglued join.’
    • ‘And some collage works best simply because the joins are bizarre.’
    • ‘She was determined to keep him out and so had sealed the join between their two Planes of Existence.’
    • ‘Moisten the edges of the pastry with water and then wrap it around the meat, pressing the joins well to seal.’
    • ‘All the joins and seams were suspiciously perfect.’
    • ‘The graphic, dynamic form on the outside is carried through inside, with elegant sweeping features at the wall and ceiling joins.’
    • ‘This is politics, after all, a web of manipulation so cleverly stitched that you can't easily see the joins.’
    • ‘In one case, a previous owner sealed the join between the bathtub and the wall with putty instead of silicone.’
    • ‘The join, or suture, between the old continents can today be located with the aid of geophysical techniques.’
    • ‘You can hear the joins, and couldn't think for even a moment that this is some acoustic as-live, technologically-innocent communion.’
    • ‘Laminate floors, due to their durability and tight joins, are recommended by the experts.’
    • ‘It means an invisible join and allows me to line up all my rows for a really neat finish.’
    • ‘He constructed the frame of Guitar to look like a window, its joins leaking the threatening weather seen through the glass.’
    • ‘You can't spot the joins between the spontaneous and the prepared, so comfortable are they with this uniquely intimate form of theatre.’
    • ‘Ivy leaves are at the top of the stem, and ivy vines twine around the bottom and connect to ivy leaves at the join.’
    • ‘When you have pushed all the hair in, secure with hairgrips along the seam formed by the join, starting at the bottom.’
    • ‘The pieces were episodic in nature; like several songs stitched together, except you couldn't see the join.’
    • ‘The wheel rim and push rim are joined together by five joins around the wheel causing a vast potential for hands to get caught or jammed in the gaps.’
    • ‘There also seems to be ample opportunity for water to access where the upper is attached to the base - the join isn't sealed at all.’
    junction, juncture, intersection, link, linkage, connection, nexus
    View synonyms


  • join battle

    • formal Begin fighting.

      • ‘The main body of forces of first-echelon armies of the front moved up on the heels of forward elements and joined battle.’
      • ‘And then, using the dealmaker's lingo for joining battle, he broke the news: ‘I'm going to engage.’’
      • ‘Expectations now fulfilled, the two clubs are set to join battle at Walsh Park on Sunday in what promises to be a right cracker of a decider.’
      • ‘We're here to mark that day in history when the allied armies joined battle to reclaim this continent to liberty.’
      • ‘This area - national security - might not have been the best place for joining battle last week, but battle is joined.’
      • ‘Joseph is generally blamed for joining battle at Vitoria while some of his divisions were some way away.’
      • ‘It won't risk damaging itself by joining battle with typical prey, such as an elephant seal.’
      • ‘There were more on the way when I moved into range, and they joined battle as I was leaving.’
      • ‘I understand Longclaw took a shuttle and went to join battle with the Lyrans.’
      • ‘He gave chase for five days and then engaged the enemy, despite four of his ships lagging behind and their captains failing to join battle.’
  • join the club

    • [in imperative]Used as an observation that someone else is in a difficult or unwelcome situation similar to one's own.

      ‘if you're confused, join the club!’
      • ‘So you see, when the Prime Minister says he could do with some co-operation, join the club, so could we.’
      • ‘But if you're wondering what the hell I'm stammering about in the final minute, join the club!’
  • join forces

    • Combine efforts.

      • ‘The idea is that when you put your foot down the electric motor and the V6 join forces to provide Herculean power.’
      • ‘You just saw the picture of Democrats and Republicans in New Orleans joining forces to support the recovery effort.’
      • ‘Environmentally-friendly fast food workers joined forces with pre-school youngsters to beat the litter bugs.’
      • ‘The premier reiterated Asian countries need to step up efforts to join forces to ensure the balance of the global economy.’
      • ‘Now, outraged people all over the UK will be joining forces to force it off the air again.’
      • ‘Cosmologists and particle physicists have therefore joined forces in the study of the early history of the Universe.’
      • ‘If you want to join forces with such organizations, that is your privilege.’
      • ‘Ground Force will also join forces with the Eden Project to create a Garden for Africa before the show comes to a close.’
      • ‘A group of military doctors and engineers have joined forces in an experimental effort to find out.’
      • ‘Three of the biggest employees in York and Selby are joining forces to provide better child care facilities for their staff.’
  • join hands

    • 1Hold each other's hands.

      • ‘Partners face each other, join hands, and form a long ‘tunnel.’’
      • ‘Once every one was seated again, Brandon and Chasity joined hands and smiled at each other.’
      • ‘About 200 people screamed this chant, joined hands and attempted to promote unity on campus yesterday outside Willard Building.’
      • ‘Before eating, everyone forms up in two circles, facing each other, joins hands and chants ‘Aum’, the Indian mantra.’
      • ‘They came together shortly before the service and spontaneously joined hands under a gray sky.’
      • ‘We feel that if we join hands and pray together we can make a difference.’
      • ‘Participants joined hands and sang ‘We Are The World,’ ‘America the Beautiful,’ and the Hands Across America theme.’
      • ‘The five children all stared longingly at each other, and joined hands in a small circle.’
      • ‘The food arrived, piping hot; they joined hands and sat together in silence, their wet clothes beginning to dry.’
      • ‘I witness the pledging of this man and woman, that they have joined hands and sworn to each other.’
      1. 1.1Work together.
        ‘education has been shy to join hands with business’
        • ‘Ma broached the idea of Toronto and Taipei joining hands to inform each other on the latest SARS information.’
        • ‘‘The North and South must unite, joining hands to help each other and protect the sovereignty of our people,’ he said.’
        • ‘After joining hands to arrest and jail Monk Tim Sakhorn, the next logical step is to join hands to boost tourism in the Indochinese Federation’
        • ‘Furthermore, multiracial congregations can powerfully join hands to resist racism together.’
        • ‘How have Vinton and Turpin joined hands to knead together art and commerce, creativity and discipline?’
        • ‘We need to create a culture of tolerance and forgiveness and join hands together as one nation.’
        • ‘HKUST joins hands with Lenovo and Microsoft to launch ‘Student Subsidy Program’.’
        • ‘For some time Mr Birender Singh even joined hands with his bête noire, Mr Bhajan Lal, to get even with Mr Hooda.’
        • ‘Until about 1720, Dutch ethnics married within the group, worshiped together, and joined hands for economic and political objectives.’
        • ‘People of all walks of life including women, children and school students joined hands in the work.’


Middle English: from Old French joindre, from Latin jungere to join.