Main definitions of jibe in US English:

: jibe1jibe2jibe3

jibe1

noun & verb

  • variant spelling of gibe

Pronunciation

jibe

/dʒaɪb//jīb/

Main definitions of jibe in US English:

: jibe1jibe2jibe3

jibe2

verb

[no object]North American
informal
  • Be in accord; agree.

    ‘the verdict does not jibe with the medical evidence’
    • ‘All the pessimism and darkness that come with a far-away war against a hard-to-find enemy just don't jibe with that mojo.’
    • ‘But the only ‘evidence’ for these upcoming disasters is the output of computer models that don't jibe with reality.’
    • ‘Similarly, if I'm in public practice, and they do something that doesn't jibe with my policies, I'm going to change my policies.’
    • ‘I'd hoped to put the vignette on the web when it was done, but it doesn't jibe at all with AuthorityJack.’
    • ‘But their working habits didn't jibe: Godrich constantly wanted to press forward, but the Strokes like to labour over every sound.’
    • ‘It doesn't jibe with the image that a lot of Americans have about this country.’
    • ‘Unknotting privacy dilemmas from first principles can be tricky, or at least lead to results that don't jibe with most people's felt intuitions.’
    • ‘This does not jibe with my experience, nor that of most Americans, at least.’
    • ‘He claims to be very liberal, but when he's voting it just doesn't jibe with what he says.’
    • ‘How does the rise of the big-box-booksellers jibe with the supposed decline in reading?’
    • ‘If Apple does come out with a response, they have to sink down to Napster's level and it doesn't jibe with their type of advertising at all.’
    • ‘I think this jibes with Xyu's recent contact with the Transducer which, as far as I can tell, is the most recent contact we have on record.’
    • ‘It's not like you have to share the office space with someone who's views don't jibe with yours, so what's the point?’
    • ‘And the sample menus included in the back of Dr. Atkins's book are of no help because they don't jibe with the instructions in the text.’
    • ‘It's an additional piece of information refuting Atkins-Taubes that happens to jibe with the controlled studies and the government surveys.’
    • ‘The ‘GE to GM’ phrase just doesn't jibe with most people's sense of their options.’
    • ‘You don't agree with them, you offer opinions that don't jibe with theirs and you get a target on your back.’
    • ‘An afternoon talking to the protesters, however, had filled her head with data that did not jibe with what she had been told.’
    • ‘But that doesn't jibe with your partisan rantings.’
    • ‘My own experiences didn't jibe with anything these family units went through.’

Origin

Early 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

jibe

/jīb//dʒaɪb/

Main definitions of jibe in US English:

: jibe1jibe2jibe3

jibe3

(British gybe)

verb

[no object]Sailing
  • 1Change course by swinging a fore-and-aft sail across a following wind.

    ‘they jibed, and the boat turned over’
    1. 1.1with object Swing (a sail or boom) across a following wind.
    2. 1.2 (of a sail or boom) swing or be swung across a following wind.
      ‘the skipper was hit by a jibing boom’

noun

Sailing
  • An act or instance of jibing.

Origin

Late 17th century: from obsolete Dutch gijben.

Pronunciation

jibe

/jīb//dʒaɪb/